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(Time)   Not news: A picture of a chick in a bathing suit on a computer screen. News: A picture of a chick on a bathing suit on a computer screen in 1956   (techland.time.com) divider line 87
    More: Cool, computer monitors, computer graphics, swimsuits, sage  
•       •       •

17801 clicks; posted to Geek » on 27 Jan 2013 at 3:30 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-27 12:42:59 PM
Lenna is impressed.

Despite what Wikipedia says, Lenna's entire centerfold has been used to calibrate medical imaging equipment... I remember seeing her on an early '80s CT scanner.
 
2013-01-27 12:50:19 PM

anwserman: DeltaPunch: anwserman: DeltaPunch: So I just GIS'd "pixelated girl" and there's a whole bunch of this chick:

[gamerlimit.com image 350x233]
I'll, uh... be in my somewhere...

See also, Mirror's Edge.

Ah, OK.... didn't know about it. That being said, that chick I posted has the wrong hair length, her tattoo is almost completely different, and even the starburst from her eye isn't drawn correctly. Cute chick, but sloppy costume.

True, it's not a perfect costume. It's above and beyond what most people do to show their love for a video game. Hell, I painted myself blue for the Sonic the Hedgehog video contest from a couple years ago.

/Mirror's Edge is a good game
//what kills replay value is that it's only a single player game


Amazing!
 
2013-01-27 01:11:33 PM

FirstNationalBastard:
VHS became the dominant form of home video because of porn. The Internet is basically a home delivery system for free porn.


That's an urban myth.

VHS had 2 hour tapes, Betamax had 1 hour tapes.

On VHS you could record a movie, on Betamax you couldn't.
 
2013-01-27 01:23:38 PM
well of course she's white
 
2013-01-27 01:26:23 PM
Dear Time,

Please fix your website. Your javascript crashes crash my browser
 
2013-01-27 01:26:43 PM

spawn73: FirstNationalBastard:
VHS became the dominant form of home video because of porn. The Internet is basically a home delivery system for free porn.

That's an urban myth.

VHS had 2 hour tapes, Betamax had 1 hour tapes.

On VHS you could record a movie, on Betamax you couldn't.


Yeah. People preferred being able to record 2 hours of porn instead of 1. That's why we have VHS. More porn.
 
2013-01-27 02:09:19 PM

spawn73: FirstNationalBastard:
VHS became the dominant form of home video because of porn. The Internet is basically a home delivery system for free porn.

That's an urban myth.

VHS had 2 hour tapes, Betamax had 1 hour tapes.

On VHS you could record a movie, on Betamax you couldn't.


Also VHS was licensed out to anyone who wanted to make VCR's, while Sony (as usual) was all "Mine! Mine!" and wouldn't allow anyone else to make Beta machines. Either that or the license fee they wanted was outrageous.
 
2013-01-27 02:18:22 PM

machoprogrammer: Dear Time,

Please fix your website. Your javascript crashes crash my browser


machoprogrammer: Dear Time,

Please fix your website. Your javascript crashes crash my browser


Stop using Netscape.
 
2013-01-27 02:31:47 PM
I've wanted to go see what one of those SAGE systems looked like. Incredibly advanced technology for the time.
 
2013-01-27 02:53:12 PM

nitefallz: machoprogrammer: Dear Time,

Please fix your website. Your javascript crashes crash my browser

machoprogrammer: Dear Time,

Please fix your website. Your javascript crashes crash my browser

Stop using Netscape.


I am using Firefox
 
2013-01-27 03:25:52 PM

Demetrius: [www.flickr.com image 500x375]


The steering wheel kills me. All the people who took that image seriously, and not one of them questioned why the computer would have a big wheel attached to it.
 
2013-01-27 03:32:35 PM

Dumb-Ass-Monkey: Demetrius: [www.flickr.com image 500x375]

The steering wheel kills me. All the people who took that image seriously, and not one of them questioned why the computer would have a big wheel attached to it.


pre-mouse input device, duh.
 
2013-01-27 03:33:23 PM
It's not a steering wheel, it's the ahead and astern throttle handwheels for the steam plant control panel of an S5W submarine. Controls the flow of steam to the ahead and astern blading of the main propulsion turbines. Hopefully that's not NNPI.
 
2013-01-27 03:47:59 PM

KarmicDisaster: Dumb-Ass-Monkey: Demetrius: [www.flickr.com image 500x375]

The steering wheel kills me. All the people who took that image seriously, and not one of them questioned why the computer would have a big wheel attached to it.

pre-mouse input device, duh.


They were anticipating all the horizontal scrolling required in Windows 8 Metro apps.
 
2013-01-27 03:58:06 PM

maxheck: Lenna is impressed.

Despite what Wikipedia says, Lenna's entire centerfold has been used to calibrate medical imaging equipment... I remember seeing her on an early '80s CT scanner.


Lena's got herself a nice ass.
 
2013-01-27 04:03:16 PM

Karac: And here I was expecting something drawn in ASCII.

BTW, do NOT do a GIS for ascii porn at work. Some of them contain a surprisingly high resolution and / or anatomical detail.


http://www.asciipr0n.com/pr0n/pinups/pinup41.txt
Dear god...
 
2013-01-27 04:06:32 PM
NSFDot-matrixhttp://www.asciipr0n.com/pr0n/pinups/pinup11.txtThe following picture was hand copied from an oldprintout from a Univac 1100 computer in 1980.Old mainframe printers made each page with 132 columns and 66 lines per page.And the pages were attached to each other,bottom of one page to the top of the next,so that the output was one long page.The unix "banner" program was written to take advantageof the long continuous printouts from those old printers.QQQQQQQQQXXX*QQQ QQQQQXXXXXX**QQQQXXX**Q QQQQQQQQX*$$$$$$*XXXXXXXXXXQQQQQ..QQQQQQQ$$******$$****XXXXXXXXXXXXX XX*QXXQ$********X$X**XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX**QXXQ***$$$$$$$$$**XXXXXXXXXXXX XXXX**QXXQ**$**XQQXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX*QXXQ*$XX*QMMMQQ$QXXXXQQQQ $$$QQQQ*XXXQXXQ$XXXQ***//***Q*XXXXXXXXXX*QQ*XXXXQXXXXXXXXX$.$XXQ* **///,,///***'QQ$$QQQ$XXQ$***////,,,,,....**..*QXXXXXXXXXXQ$XXXQQ*** //,,,,.*Q$*'''* //*QXXXXXXXQ*XXXX$Q**//,,L ;$Q .../*QXXXXXX*XQXXXXXQ***/,... *$ .*QQQQ$ .*QXXXX$QXXQXXXXQ *. . .Q$Q $'' .*QQXXX$*XQQXXXX$Q$$$Q., ,Q $Q' ./**QQ$XX**XQQXXX$ .,.,.. 1 .. .,/**QXQX***X$XXQ . *Q$''Q.. ,,... .,/QQX***XQX$ *'Q$$* ... .,Q, ../QXQ***XQ * *Q*QQ' ,,. $Q 1. *XQ**XQ $Q**//,,.. * Q$ *... *QXX*XX QXX***//,. *,Q .. ..* *QXX*X *QX$XQ**/, . .*Q$$*** .,$XXXX* QXX*'XX'*&&&// . *Q$$Q*Q$$* .,*/QXXXXQ QXXXX*QXXXXQ&&&&/, ., Q$Q**Q$$Q*,.. &Q&&$XXXXXXXXXXQXQXXXXX$&&&&// ..Q*$$$Q*',. &Q&&&QXXXXXXXXXQXX$XXXXXX'Q&&&&//,. .,. //*'&&/&$XXX*Q*XXXXQXXXXXXXXQ&&&//,,L .. ,//Q*&&//&QXMMM$$QQ*-
 
2013-01-27 04:08:20 PM
NormallyTechnos:

GAT_00: I can't even imagine how much coding work that must have taken.

Not much. The system had a light pen digitizer to direct planes, and the capability to store and replay any image to test the display and to run training simulations.

All they needed was a photonegative transparancy of the image, really. When they're done putting the points into the display, they dump the displayed image to a punched tape.


Aaaaannnnd... This is how you tell a modern programmer.

"It's no big deal, it's just a class library call!" Yes, but the library had to be written.

I'm curious to know how the punch cards got translated to useful information for an analog computer. What little I know about applied analog computers involves punchboards.

Mad_Radhu:

KarmicDisaster: Dumb-Ass-Monkey: Demetrius: [www.flickr.com image 500x375]

The steering wheel kills me. All the people who took that image seriously, and not one of them questioned why the computer would have a big wheel attached to it.

pre-mouse input device, duh.


Pong, anyone?

Demetrius:

[Lukket's best troll ever.jpg]

CSB...

I did some contract work reporting to the CIO of a Fortune 500 company that will remain nameless other than to say they recently merged with another company and they make orange or blue power tools.

He had a picture of the Lukket 2000 on his wall and he believed it was real. I had to gently explain it to him, and in fact for all I know he's here on Fark now.
 
2013-01-27 05:08:44 PM

Dumb-Ass-Monkey: Demetrius: [www.flickr.com image 500x375]

The steering wheel kills me. All the people who took that image seriously, and not one of them questioned why the computer would have a big wheel attached to it.


No, no, that was version 1 of netscape navigator..
 
2013-01-27 05:24:15 PM
What a hot woman looked like on my first computer:

www.xlatari.com
 
2013-01-27 06:19:44 PM

Marine1: I've wanted to go see what one of those SAGE systems looked like. Incredibly advanced technology for the time.


upload.wikimedia.org

If you're ever in California, there are a few pieces of one at the Computer History Museum.
 
2013-01-27 06:47:37 PM

GAT_00: jake_lex: Demetrius: [www.flickr.com image 500x375]

It's funny how science fiction of the '50s and that era so overestimated the potential of space travel (I should be posting this from the vicinity of Alpha Centauri by now, according to them), and so underestimated the potential of computers (the computers on the Enterprise looked like they still used punch cards.)

It's hard to fault science fiction writers for being unable to predict the processing power of purified silicon.  The technological jump they gave us was hard to imagine.


Or to understand advances in information techology; even sophisticated computers in old sci were either oracles, or more usually served up books like an old time jukebox served up records.

Also, they were always giant centralized mainframes, the idea that millions of computers hooked up to the internet as anything but dumb terminals was beyond the ken of any of the writers.

At any rate, space had the factor of being like human experience, only more so. Going to Mars was like Columbus discovering the New World. Plenty of savages to tame, goods to be brought back in space galleons, etc.
 
2013-01-27 07:03:05 PM

Demetrius: [www.flickr.com image 500x375]


Stand back! I'm going to drive this god damn thing straight into those nazi bastards! RAMMING SPEED!


lol, computer wheel
 
2013-01-27 07:25:23 PM

Jim_Callahan: Pretty impressive if you realize how much of a biatch it is to coax graphics out of an oscilloscope.


It's a vector display, not an oscilloscope. (An oscilloscope does, though, use a very similar setup to display).

If you're old enough to remember it, the original arcade version of asteroids used a vector display, too, which is why it looked weird.
 
2013-01-27 07:31:33 PM
Fano:

GAT_00: jake_lex: Demetrius: [www.flickr.com image 500x375]

It's funny how science fiction of the '50s and that era so overestimated the potential of space travel (I should be posting this from the vicinity of Alpha Centauri by now, according to them), and so underestimated the potential of computers (the computers on the Enterprise looked like they still used punch cards.)

It's hard to fault science fiction writers for being unable to predict the processing power of purified silicon. The technological jump they gave us was hard to imagine.

Or to understand advances in information techology; even sophisticated computers in old sci were either oracles, or more usually served up books like an old time jukebox served up records.

Also, they were always giant centralized mainframes, the idea that millions of computers hooked up to the internet as anything but dumb terminals was beyond the ken of any of the writers.

At any rate, space had the factor of being like human experience, only more so. Going to Mars was like Columbus discovering the New World. Plenty of savages to tame, goods to be brought back in space galleons, etc.


Prognostication is a biatch. One of the better ones was Isaac Asimov's prediction that you would first have a self-contained mobile robot that could understand the whims and speech of a small child but would be mute itself, and a computer that could do speech synthesis would take up half the floor of a museum.

/ would not have predicted 20 years ago what most people have on their cell phones. Am willing to be surprised.
 
2013-01-27 07:51:40 PM

Twilight Farkle: Marine1: I've wanted to go see what one of those SAGE systems looked like. Incredibly advanced technology for the time.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 640x427]

If you're ever in California, there are a few pieces of one at the Computer History Museum.


A lot of retired SAGE computers ended up being bought up by Irwin Allen at Army Surplus prices and repurposed as sets for a lot of his shows, like Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea and The Time Tunnel.

www.starringthecomputer.com

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Dz2t5EV_NA
 
2013-01-27 08:39:43 PM

maxheck: Fano:

GAT_00: jake_lex: Demetrius: [www.flickr.com image 500x375]

It's funny how science fiction of the '50s and that era so overestimated the potential of space travel (I should be posting this from the vicinity of Alpha Centauri by now, according to them), and so underestimated the potential of computers (the computers on the Enterprise looked like they still used punch cards.)

It's hard to fault science fiction writers for being unable to predict the processing power of purified silicon. The technological jump they gave us was hard to imagine.

Or to understand advances in information techology; even sophisticated computers in old sci were either oracles, or more usually served up books like an old time jukebox served up records.

Also, they were always giant centralized mainframes, the idea that millions of computers hooked up to the internet as anything but dumb terminals was beyond the ken of any of the writers.

At any rate, space had the factor of being like human experience, only more so. Going to Mars was like Columbus discovering the New World. Plenty of savages to tame, goods to be brought back in space galleons, etc.

Prognostication is a biatch. One of the better ones was Isaac Asimov's prediction that you would first have a self-contained mobile robot that could understand the whims and speech of a small child but would be mute itself, and a computer that could do speech synthesis would take up half the floor of a museum.

/ would not have predicted 20 years ago what most people have on their cell phones. Am willing to be surprised.


Prognostication IS a biatch. It is difficult for someone of decades ago to imagine what the communications revolution would mean, it was a total game changer. Predicting star voyages by comparison isn't as hard, since it basically takes "the present, but more so" to an extreme. There were already analogues for galactic exploration and conquest.

Hell, my fiancee went to India for November. We talked face to face FOR FREE in real time on skype. Dick Tracy can shove his wristwatch radio up Tess Trueheart's twat. Sci-fi writers were inventing robots that would manipulate computers by being automated punchcard operators. It's hard to imagine all the little ways that a global communications network that allows common people* and not just military outfits and kings to communicate. Actually, the world still hasn't absorbed it all yet. Just think, with a smart phone, everybody carries their own version of the Hitchiker's Guide to the Galaxy wherever they go. Hell, not so many years ago having a good set of encyclopedias in your house would be useful. We didn't go all crystal spires and togas with our technology, one of the reasons I liked Star Wars better than Star Trek (people still had common human needs, just with higher tech than we have)

...long digression, but I'll give the sci-fi writers a pass because they were coming up with a good hook for a story, not laying out an entire well thought out future history that included advancements and predictions that wouldn't exist until they were dead or stopped writing. But one that stands out as the most astonishing failure of imagination, that boggles the mind to the modern reader, is the idea that America/England/the United Federation of Earth would be fighting Soviet style commies well past the year 5000 in an endless struggle. Star Trek may be the only franchise I can think of, although I don't recall the nature of Chekov's background. Granted, the Genetics Wars were supposed to have taken place in the 1990s. Also, I'm not sure, but they may have fought a planet of hats that wore ushankas.

I'd challenge fark to come up with ANY sci-fi writers from 1930-1990 that wrote a version of the future in which Soviet communism imploded based on granting reforms that snowballed into a relatively non-violent overthrow of European communism. No prize for any writers that mention commies in passing, then suddenly there were none for no reason.
 
2013-01-27 08:58:13 PM
Fano:

maxheck: Fano:

GAT_00: jake_lex: Demetrius: [www.flickr.com image 500x375]

It's funny how science fiction of the '50s and that era so overestimated the potential of space travel (I should be posting this from the vicinity of Alpha Centauri by now, according to them), and so underestimated the potential of computers (the computers on the Enterprise looked like they still used punch cards.)

It's hard to fault science fiction writers for being unable to predict the processing power of purified silicon. The technological jump they gave us was hard to imagine.

Or to understand advances in information techology; even sophisticated computers in old sci were either oracles, or more usually served up books like an old time jukebox served up records.

Also, they were always giant centralized mainframes, the idea that millions of computers hooked up to the internet as anything but dumb terminals was beyond the ken of any of the writers.

At any rate, space had the factor of being like human experience, only more so. Going to Mars was like Columbus discovering the New World. Plenty of savages to tame, goods to be brought back in space galleons, etc.

Prognostication is a biatch. One of the better ones was Isaac Asimov's prediction that you would first have a self-contained mobile robot that could understand the whims and speech of a small child but would be mute itself, and a computer that could do speech synthesis would take up half the floor of a museum.

/ would not have predicted 20 years ago what most people have on their cell phones. Am willing to be surprised.

Prognostication IS a biatch. It is difficult for someone of decades ago to imagine what the communications revolution would mean, it was a total game changer. Predicting star voyages by comparison isn't as hard, since it basically takes "the present, but more so" to an extreme. There were already analogues for galactic exploration and conquest.

Hell, my fiancee went to India for November. We talked face to face FOR FREE in real time on skype. Dick Tracy can shove his wristwatch radio up Tess Trueheart's twat. Sci-fi writers were inventing robots that would manipulate computers by being automated punchcard operators. It's hard to imagine all the little ways that a global communications network that allows common people* and not just military outfits and kings to communicate. Actually, the world still hasn't absorbed it all yet. Just think, with a smart phone, everybody carries their own version of the Hitchiker's Guide to the Galaxy wherever they go. Hell, not so many years ago having a good set of encyclopedias in your house would be useful. We didn't go all crystal spires and togas with our technology, one of the reasons I liked Star Wars better than Star Trek (people still had common human needs, just with higher tech than we have)

...long digression, but I'll give the sci-fi writers a pass because they were coming up with a good hook for a story, not laying out an entire well thought out future history that included advancements and predictions that wouldn't exist until they were dead or stopped writing. But one that stands out as the most astonishing failure of imagination, that boggles the mind to the modern reader, is the idea that America/England/the United Federation of Earth would be fighting Soviet style commies well past the year 5000 in an endless struggle. Star Trek may be the only franchise I can think of, although I don't recall the nature of Chekov's background. Granted, the Genetics Wars were supposed to have taken place in the 1990s. Also, I'm not sure, but they may have fought a planet of hats that wore ushankas.

I'd challenge fark to come up with ANY sci-fi writers from 1930-1990 that wrote a version of the future in which Soviet communism imploded based on granting reforms that snowballed into a relatively non-violent overthrow of European communism. No prize for any writers that mention commies in passing, then suddenly there were none for no reason.


The more self-aware writers always realized that they were writing possible futures, not definite ones. No one ages more poorly than a soothsayer.

I'm no writer, but I'd imagine that that would me most of the fun, saying "Ok, THIS would be cool..." and then describing what could be and working the implications. And then being delighted by being completely wrong in interesting ways.
 
2013-01-27 11:21:28 PM

meanmutton: If you're old enough to remember it, the original arcade version of asteroids used a vector display, too, which is why it looked weird. farkING AWESOME!


FTFY
 
2013-01-27 11:35:13 PM

machoprogrammer: nitefallz: machoprogrammer: Dear Time,

Please fix your website. Your javascript crashes crash my browser

machoprogrammer: Dear Time,

Please fix your website. Your javascript crashes crash my browser

Stop using Netscape.

I am using Firefox


Please tell me that this is a joke...
 
2013-01-28 04:29:07 AM
While the art of computer graphics may be interesting,

It is the level of EFFORT it took to make graphics in the past that is even more fascinating.


I think many don't realize the coding involved just to make your standard GUI back then.

/old school
 
2013-01-28 05:26:02 AM

maxheck: Lenna is impressed.

Despite what Wikipedia says, Lenna's entire centerfold has been used to calibrate medical imaging equipment... I remember seeing her on an early '80s CT scanner.


How delightfully obscure. Also, dat Swedish ass.
 
2013-01-28 08:19:38 AM
Came for RTTY porn, left disappointed.
 
2013-01-28 09:23:45 AM
...bookmark
 
2013-01-28 02:41:38 PM

bionicjoe: NSFDot-matrixhttp://www.asciipr0n.com/pr0n/pinups/pinup11.txtThe following picture was hand copied from an oldprintout from a Univac 1100 computer in 1980.Old mainframe printers made each page with 132 columns and 66 lines per page.And the pages were attached to each other,bottom of one page to the top of the next,so that the output was one long page.The unix "banner" program was written to take advantageof the long continuous printouts from those old printers.QQQQQQQQQXXX*QQQ QQQQQXXXXXX**QQQQXXX**Q QQQQQQQQX*$$$$$$*XXXXXXXXXXQQQQQ..QQQQQQQ$$******$$****XXXXXXXXXXXXX XX*QXXQ$********X$X**XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX**QXXQ***$$$$$$$$$**XXXXXXXXXXXX XXXX**QXXQ**$**XQQXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX*QXXQ*$XX*QMMMQQ$QXXXXQQQQ $$$QQQQ*XXXQXXQ$XXXQ***//***Q*XXXXXXXXXX*QQ*XXXXQXXXXXXXXX$.$XXQ* **///,,///***'QQ$$QQQ$XXQ$***////,,,,,....**..*QXXXXXXXXXXQ$XXXQQ*** //,,,,.*Q$*'''* //*QXXXXXXXQ*XXXX$Q**//,,L ;$Q .../*QXXXXXX*XQXXXXXQ***/,... *$ .*QQQQ$ .*QXXXX$QXXQXXXXQ *. . .Q$Q $'' .*QQXXX$*XQQXXXX$Q$$$Q., ,Q $Q' ./**QQ$XX**XQQXXX$ .,.,.. 1 .. .,/**QXQX***X$XXQ . *Q$''Q.. ,,... .,/QQX***XQX$ *'Q$$* ... .,Q, ../QXQ***XQ * *Q*QQ' ,,. $Q 1. *XQ**XQ $Q**//,,.. * Q$ *... *QXX*XX QXX***//,. *,Q .. ..* *QXX*X *QX$XQ**/, . .*Q$$*** .,$XXXX* QXX*'XX'*&&&// . *Q$$Q*Q$$* .,*/QXXXXQ QXXXX*QXXXXQ&&&&/, ., Q$Q**Q$$Q*,.. &Q&&$XXXXXXXXXXQXQXXXXX$&&&&// ..Q*$$$Q*',. &Q&&&QXXXXXXXXXQXX$XXXXXX'Q&&&&//,. .,. //*'&&/&$XXX*Q*XXXXQXXXXXXXXQ&&&//,,L .. ,//Q*&&//&QXMMM$$QQ*-


If you stand back about 4 feet from the screen and cross your eyes a little, you can see the lighthouse! And there are three dolphins playing in the water. And some naked chick. These 3-D pictures are so cool.
 
2013-01-28 11:38:46 PM

GAT_00: jake_lex: Demetrius: [www.flickr.com image 500x375]

It's funny how science fiction of the '50s and that era so overestimated the potential of space travel (I should be posting this from the vicinity of Alpha Centauri by now, according to them), and so underestimated the potential of computers (the computers on the Enterprise looked like they still used punch cards.)

It's hard to fault science fiction writers for being unable to predict the processing power of purified silicon.  The technological jump they gave us was hard to imagine.



In 1988 there was a symposium at MIT on the topic of telecommunications. At one point in the symposium, talk turned to the future of telecommunications.
According to W. Russell Neuman, by the turn of the century, "what were separate media at one time - newspapers delivered by newspaper boys, magazines delivered by mail, television, radio, records, compact disks, will all come through what some people refer to as 'the big pipe theory.'" Extolling the advantages of optic fiber over copper wire, Neuman continued, "The band-width of this optical fiber pipe would be such that one could see high resolution still graphics print out on a high-resolution home-graphic center."
Curiously, although home computers were certainly in limited use by this point, the article did not mention them once. Apparently, at least not at an MIT symposium, no link was foreseen, not even 12 years in the future, between home computing and massive amounts of data existing the outside world.
 
2013-01-29 03:38:30 PM

Jim_Callahan: Pretty impressive if you realize how much of a biatch it is to coax graphics out of an oscilloscope.


That's just a round screen. It's not an oscilloscope. It looks very similar to the ASA-66 display system from the early 60's. It's a monocolor CRT. It wouldn't be more than a couple of tricks to get the vectors to work to do that.
 
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