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(WWSB ABC 7)   "We had a person that was doctor shopping and after we looking into it more we discovered she had 56 doctors, over 150 to 170 different scripts, and over 70 different pharmacies"   ( mysuncoast.com) divider line
    More: Scary, doctor shopping, narcotic drugs, pharmacy, Sarasota County, stories, physicians  
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11955 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Jan 2013 at 1:07 AM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-27 02:56:22 AM  
Housemate went through some shiat over the last couple years. Probably ended up seeing a dozen or more doctors, at least one scrip from each. Most ended up not working out, or being supplanted/replaced by a different medication.

Only two pharmacies though.

Still, some people might actually need, you know, medical care from more than one doc.
 
2013-01-27 02:57:14 AM  
cowgirl toffee:

I usually keep Xanax on-hand because of my social anxiety. I find people are much easier to deal with if I get them all doped up first.
 
2013-01-27 02:57:54 AM  
Oh, and goodrx.com rocks.
 
2013-01-27 02:58:36 AM  

GranoblasticMan: cowgirl toffee:

I usually keep Xanax on-hand because of my social anxiety. I find people are much easier to deal with if I get them all doped up first.


Pleeeesssee tell me you own a "free candy" van.
 
2013-01-27 03:01:53 AM  

Commander_Neckbeard: I refuse to take any kind of narcotic analgesic for fear of addiction. I've taken them twice, once after I had my wisdom teeth out, (I took one pill and didn't really need that) and once when I broke down during a sinus infection and took one offered to me by my wife, felt very very guilty after that. I won't touch them anymore at all, and I'm hoping that I can keep singing that tune if I'm in pain.


I choose not to takeany medication unless it is absolutely necessary. Real pain is a good reason, but the two years I spent in physical therapy taught me that far too many people overestimate their pain. Every day, people who are getting around perfectly well and in a generally pleasant mood describe their pain as an 8 or 9 out of 10. Those ratings are supposed to mean near-crippling pain. It's ridiculous, and quite insulting to those in true pain. I got off the pain meds withing two weeks of my surgery (ORIF of my right calcaneus), and have taken maybe a dozen naproxen in the two years since. I still have chronic pain, but it isn't bad enough that I feel it warrants medication.

Yes, we're all different, and feel pain differently, but we're living in a culture driven by addiction and the products that feed those addictions, and it's upsetting to see so many people caught up in it.

/omg haven't had coffee in almost an hour
 
2013-01-27 03:02:35 AM  

Harry_Seldon: penfold314: You realize it is the opiates that are making you itchy

They tend to make me scratchy.


anti-histamines get rid of the itchiness.

Incidentally, some anti-histamines also potentate the opiates. Double Bonus!
 
2013-01-27 03:04:05 AM  
Oh so this is how we are going to make it so you are forced to keep shiatty doctors. I freaking hate the world.
 
2013-01-27 03:06:21 AM  

Uchiha_Cycliste: Incidentally, some anti-histamines also potentate the opiates. Double Bonus!


Triple if you add mocha.

waterlooshrineclub.webs.com
 
2013-01-27 03:06:37 AM  

Thunderboy: Yes, we're all different, and feel pain differently, but we're living in a culture driven by addiction and the products that feed those addictions, and it's upsetting to see so many people caught up in it.


Still not a good reason to punish good doctors or limit access to a drug just because a small percentage are abusing it.
 
2013-01-27 03:10:34 AM  

MisterTweak: About 30 seconds after the patent expires on any given drug, you can bet the manufacturer will be shocked, *shocked!* to discover that people are abusing it, and promptly recommend a crackdown, along with a replacement of it's new, same drug, in a new, generically developed delivery form.


It doesn't work like that. If I'm a Pharma with 4 years left on my 300 mg active tablet, I can't just make it a 350 mg tablet or make it twice-daily instead of 4 times. or coat it with a buffering compound. To do so would mean submitting a whole lot of paper to the FDA, probably 4 years worth, at which point it becomes moot because there are jillions of pharmas copying that product (at exactly the specs you're now trying to get away from because you've already done the research), because it's off-patent. What they do is say, "Hey, this drug that's just about to come off patent for headaches, we just found out it gives you a boner, so now it's an ED drug!" Bing... you get a patent extension, and if it doesn't kill the patient and actually gives him a boner, well, that's the bonus round.
 
2013-01-27 03:12:39 AM  
I did not understand what was going on until I ran into an old friend who did this a few years ago. She was on 25 pills 3x a day. Absolutely insane! This was beyond recreation and beyond pain management. She was unable to work so those that she had extra she sold to people, it created a dangerous cycle. Then buying them back 2 days later.
After seeing her lifestyle a few times I had to cut her loose as a friend because she kept asking me for money etc.. and I did not want to enable it.
I'm sure she is still doing it now and wonder how people can live like that.
 
2013-01-27 03:24:44 AM  
Only 70?

Amateur.

/ Come to Thailand, they don't require scripts.Just act like you know what you're talking about.
// Cheap too!
 
2013-01-27 03:26:44 AM  

LordOfThePings: Uchiha_Cycliste: Incidentally, some anti-histamines also potentate the opiates. Double Bonus!

Triple if you add mocha.

[waterlooshrineclub.webs.com image 400x585]


lulz
 
2013-01-27 03:30:31 AM  

Genevieve Marie: cretinbob: This is why I can't get something for my farking back.

Yup. It's why so awful for me to get a new ambien prescription when I moved. I came in with my medical records, and my former doctor's phone number, and a write up of how my sleep disorder has affected me throughout my life and how well my medication has been working for the last several years- and still got treated like an addict looking for fun stuff.

It was really demeaning and dehumanizing to have to go through that process too.


FTA: "We have patients who come in all the time trying to get them and we just keep it simple and tell them we don't have any because we don't carry them,"

If you do get a script, good luck getting it filled.... I guess their attitude is because some people are abusing the system, fark em all.
 
2013-01-27 03:33:06 AM  

EnigmaBurn: / Come to Thailand, they don't require scripts.Just act like you know what you're talking about.


See, the problem with bodegas is they never remember you. - You always have to do something extreme to let 'em know it's you and you're cool
"Hey, fellas. Y'all know me. Come on, now. Look at this"
Hey, black ass. Why you didn't moon us earlier, eh ?
lt's a little degrading, but the weed ain't bad.
 
2013-01-27 03:52:16 AM  
www.piquenewsmagazine.com

/a picture is always worth more than a thousand words
//go green, come clean
 
2013-01-27 03:53:26 AM  
FTFA:
"We have patients who come in all the time trying to get them and we just keep it simple and tell them we don't have any because we don't carry them," said Dr. Suleman Bux.

OMG, really? Why, that's tantamount to people trying to get something they want and/or need for themselves, if you ask me. How dare these people try to think for themselves? This is a decision that should be made by a doctor, or a health care insurance bureaucrat, or really anyone OTHER THAN the patient.

Thank FSM the way have mechanisms in place to save the people from themselves!

/aaaaaaaand the laaaaaaaaand ooo-ooo-ooof the freeeeee-eee....
 
2013-01-27 03:54:04 AM  

Snausages75: Did you use the same prescription insurance at both pharmacies? Insurance companies check for over utilization when the claim is submitted electronically by the pharmacy.

Unless there is a state database involved, if you pay cash for a prescription at Walgreens and two weeks later take a new prescription for the same thing to CVS, the CVS and Walgreens systems themselves don't talk to each other. It's the insurance company's data that follows you.


Interesting, I didn't know that.
 
2013-01-27 04:03:54 AM  

HindiDiscoMonster: Genevieve Marie: cretinbob: This is why I can't get something for my farking back.

Yup. It's why so awful for me to get a new ambien prescription when I moved. I came in with my medical records, and my former doctor's phone number, and a write up of how my sleep disorder has affected me throughout my life and how well my medication has been working for the last several years- and still got treated like an addict looking for fun stuff.

It was really demeaning and dehumanizing to have to go through that process too.

FTA: "We have patients who come in all the time trying to get them and we just keep it simple and tell them we don't have any because we don't carry them,"

If you do get a script, good luck getting it filled.... I guess their attitude is because some people are abusing the system, fark em all.


Sadly, this attitude has become necessary in Florida. For the last year, my pharmacy has dotted their i's and crossed their t's when it comes to C-II scripts. Every single one that comes through the door gets checked against the state database and we call the doctor to verify a proper diagnosis and patient/doctor relationship. What do we get for our trouble? Multiple DEA audits and a threat that if we do not curb the amount we are dispensing they are going to drop the hammer on us.

Sure, the jackass pill-mill doctor down the street can write scripts for 180 Oxy 30s, 300 Percocet 10/325s, and 90 Xanax 2mg for every patient that walks in his door. (quite literally writing a minimum of 48,000 oxycodone tablets per day). Absolutely nothing happens to this guy. The pharmacy, however, is given the option of never carrying Oxycodone 30mg again or being harassed and possibly shut down. Why do we have to stop carrying the medication instead of just denying scripts that we feel are not justified? Because every script we decline to fill requires about 5 pages of paperwork and carries the risk that you get sued by the patient and the doctor.

It also does not help that at one point, the US was consuming 99% of the world's supply of hydrocodone and 80% of the supply of oxycodone.
 
2013-01-27 04:11:23 AM  

Genevieve Marie: Yup. It's why so awful for me to get a new ambien prescription when I moved.


WTF is it with doctor's and ambien these days? It's not a painkiller. I don't even think it counts as a controlled substance.

My wife was on it for years, and when she had to change doctors after we moved, the new guy parsed out Ambien like it was made of diamonds. She was accustomed to taking one every night, and he wouldn't give her a prescription for more than 30 pills for three months. He told her to turn a fan on in the bedroom if she was having trouble sleeping.

What. The. Fark?
 
2013-01-27 04:19:26 AM  
CSB:

I have chronic gastritis and have spent many days in hospital beds and emergency rooms. One recent 5-year period of my life yielded 4 ER visits including a 6 day stay in the hospital for observation (thank you, God, for Xanax and Dilaudid). I have always been an anxious person, so my doctor gave me the smallest possible prescription for Xanax, which worked SO well at helping to regulate my GI issues that I went to see a gastroenterologist at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, FL. When I mentioned I thought my anxiety was affecting my stomach he said that can often be the case and recommended I see a psychiatrist. I'm assuming I had no problem getting my current Klonopin prescription because my PC had been seeing me for about 15 years and I already had a diagnosis including anxiety from the specialist.

The funny part is that it's all this talk about doctor shopping, etc., that kept me from asking for the very thing that has kept me out of the hospital for 2 years now.

/One time I put off going to the hospital, for fear of cost, for 6 days but eventually relented because I couldn't even keep water down (well not much anyway) and was afraid I'd die from dehydration.
//It's amazing how quickly they get you in to see someone when you tell them you haven't been able to keep down liquids for 6 days.
 
2013-01-27 04:26:15 AM  

omnimancer28: HindiDiscoMonster: Genevieve Marie: cretinbob: This is why I can't get something for my farking back.

Yup. It's why so awful for me to get a new ambien prescription when I moved. I came in with my medical records, and my former doctor's phone number, and a write up of how my sleep disorder has affected me throughout my life and how well my medication has been working for the last several years- and still got treated like an addict looking for fun stuff.

It was really demeaning and dehumanizing to have to go through that process too.

FTA: "We have patients who come in all the time trying to get them and we just keep it simple and tell them we don't have any because we don't carry them,"

If you do get a script, good luck getting it filled.... I guess their attitude is because some people are abusing the system, fark em all.

Sadly, this attitude has become necessary in Florida. For the last year, my pharmacy has dotted their i's and crossed their t's when it comes to C-II scripts. Every single one that comes through the door gets checked against the state database and we call the doctor to verify a proper diagnosis and patient/doctor relationship. What do we get for our trouble? Multiple DEA audits and a threat that if we do not curb the amount we are dispensing they are going to drop the hammer on us.

Sure, the jackass pill-mill doctor down the street can write scripts for 180 Oxy 30s, 300 Percocet 10/325s, and 90 Xanax 2mg for every patient that walks in his door. (quite literally writing a minimum of 48,000 oxycodone tablets per day). Absolutely nothing happens to this guy. The pharmacy, however, is given the option of never carrying Oxycodone 30mg again or being harassed and possibly shut down. Why do we have to stop carrying the medication instead of just denying scripts that we feel are not justified? Because every script we decline to fill requires about 5 pages of paperwork and carries the risk that you get sued by the patient and the doctor.

It ...


my comment is directed at the DEA, not the pharmacies. I know about the audits. Thanks DEA.
 
2013-01-27 04:31:50 AM  

Lsherm: Genevieve Marie: Yup. It's why so awful for me to get a new ambien prescription when I moved.

WTF is it with doctor's and ambien these days? It's not a painkiller. I don't even think it counts as a controlled substance.

My wife was on it for years, and when she had to change doctors after we moved, the new guy parsed out Ambien like it was made of diamonds. She was accustomed to taking one every night, and he wouldn't give her a prescription for more than 30 pills for three months. He told her to turn a fan on in the bedroom if she was having trouble sleeping.

What. The. Fark?


It can have side effects that are pleasant enough for people to take it recreationally. Therefore your wife is evil for wanting it. Feeling good is bad and she should feel bad for wanting a good night's sleep. Bad and evil.
 
2013-01-27 04:41:46 AM  

jtown: Lsherm: Genevieve Marie: Yup. It's why so awful for me to get a new ambien prescription when I moved.

WTF is it with doctor's and ambien these days? It's not a painkiller. I don't even think it counts as a controlled substance.

My wife was on it for years, and when she had to change doctors after we moved, the new guy parsed out Ambien like it was made of diamonds. She was accustomed to taking one every night, and he wouldn't give her a prescription for more than 30 pills for three months. He told her to turn a fan on in the bedroom if she was having trouble sleeping.

What. The. Fark?

It can have side effects that are pleasant enough for people to take it recreationally. Therefore your wife is evil for wanting it. Feeling good is bad and she should feel bad for wanting a good night's sleep. Bad and evil.


It could also be that Ambien is an addictive medication which is only designed for short term use. Perhaps the new doctor actually cares about helping her treat the root cause of her insomnia instead of having her take Ambien in a way it is not designed for.
 
2013-01-27 04:54:52 AM  
Ambien is also being depicted in articles as a blackout drug. Some people take it and flake, which makes for good reading.

Here is an article from 3 days ago:

http://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2013/01/10/fda-cuts-ambien-dosage s -in-half-amid-concerns-of-sleepy-driving
 
2013-01-27 04:57:03 AM  
dammit sorry, meant to edit before posting:

Said Article
 
2013-01-27 05:08:02 AM  

Rumpertumpskin: Ambien is also being depicted in articles as a blackout drug. Some people take it and flake, which makes for good reading.

Here is an article from 3 days ago:

http://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2013/01/10/fda-cuts-ambien-dosage s -in-half-amid-concerns-of-sleepy-driving


The short term effects are not really what bother me about Ambien. It is the lack of studies regarding long-term use. The studies that DO exist indicate that long-term daily use leads to tolerance, severe insomnia, and memory loss not related to the "blackouts". Scary shiat when I consider how many of my patients have developed such a need for it that they cannot sleep without using Ambien + a benzodiazepine.
 
2013-01-27 05:08:17 AM  

Lsherm: Genevieve Marie: Yup. It's why so awful for me to get a new ambien prescription when I moved.

WTF is it with doctor's and ambien these days? It's not a painkiller. I don't even think it counts as a controlled substance.

My wife was on it for years, and when she had to change doctors after we moved, the new guy parsed out Ambien like it was made of diamonds. She was accustomed to taking one every night, and he wouldn't give her a prescription for more than 30 pills for three months. He told her to turn a fan on in the bedroom if she was having trouble sleeping.

What. The. Fark?


Ambien is a Schedule IV Controlled Substance. For comparison, Vicodin is Schedule III, Percocet is Schedule II, and heroin is Schedule I.

I am not implying that your wife has a problem, but I worked with a pharmacist whose wife was addicted to it and had a nasty time getting clean. I think Eminem was also addicted to it for a time.

I had good luck with taking Rozerem for insomnia. It is not a controlled substance; it's related to melatonin. The only crap things about taking it was the nasty $50/month copay and the fact that it didn't work on middle insomnia (when you can't stay asleep.).
 
2013-01-27 05:12:38 AM  

omnimancer28: jtown: Lsherm: Genevieve Marie: Yup. It's why so awful for me to get a new ambien prescription when I moved.

WTF is it with doctor's and ambien these days? It's not a painkiller. I don't even think it counts as a controlled substance.


It might also be that The Engineers from Prometheus are all facepalming about it...

s9.postimage.org
 
2013-01-27 05:23:43 AM  

3.bp.blogspot.com

 
2013-01-27 05:47:41 AM  

Snausages75: I am not implying that your wife has a problem,


Well she isn't taking it anymore, so I guess it isn't a problem.  She also isn't sleeping.

I don't get the problem.  It puts you to sleep for at least 8 hours, you wake up rested, and you go about your day.  It does exactly what it's supposed to do and it helps people who can't sleep.

omnimancer28: Perhaps the new doctor actually cares about helping her treat the root cause of her insomnia


I wish, but he hasn't made any move in that direction, either.  He just seems to think avoiding sleeping pills is eventually going to get her into a normal sleeping pattern.  I can sympathize with his reasoning, but this common belief that people sleep when they are tired isn't necessarily true. She just goes weeks being tired all the time.

We've been married 22 years, and she hasn't slept easily for any of them.  Myself, I have the apnea, so I've been to countless sleep studies and I can sleep like a baby.  Before I got the CPAP, I could still fall asleep at the drop of a hat, but I wasn't getting any good sleep.
 
2013-01-27 05:48:18 AM  

cretinbob: This is why I can't get something for my farking back.


You can blame that on people who vote for Democrats or Republicans.
 
2013-01-27 05:51:26 AM  

SquiggsIN: Florida does not have a prescription drug registration, database, or pretty much any control over what licensed doctors do in their state.

This should've just been labled with the usual "Florida" tag as the entire state is "Scary".


You see living without a government regulator/enforcer watching every move you make as scary? That's sad.
 
2013-01-27 06:07:27 AM  

DrPainMD: SquiggsIN: Florida does not have a prescription drug registration, database, or pretty much any control over what licensed doctors do in their state.

This should've just been labled with the usual "Florida" tag as the entire state is "Scary".

You see living without a government regulator/enforcer watching every move you make as scary? That's sad.


Doctors and pharmacists are sworn to do no harm to patients and to act in their best interests. Being their legal drug-dealer breaches that oath and does harm to our entire profession. If you want to legalize hard drugs for recreational use, then do it. But as long as there are prescribers writing 100% of their prescriptions for oxycodone and xanax we should heavily regulate the industry. I would also like a way to prevent a physician from state-hopping whenever their license is forfeited for malpractice or unethical conduct.
 
2013-01-27 06:09:42 AM  

omnimancer28: Rumpertumpskin: Ambien is also being depicted in articles as a blackout drug. Some people take it and flake, which makes for good reading.

Here is an article from 3 days ago:

http://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2013/01/10/fda-cuts-ambien-dosage s -in-half-amid-concerns-of-sleepy-driving

The short term effects are not really what bother me about Ambien. It is the lack of studies regarding long-term use. The studies that DO exist indicate that long-term daily use leads to tolerance, severe insomnia, and memory loss not related to the "blackouts". Scary shiat when I consider how many of my patients have developed such a need for it that they cannot sleep without using Ambien + a benzodiazepine.


I'm sorry but that's a load of horseshiat. Took me five minutes to find this one:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23115404 and I've read more based off links from there.

It's not for everyone, but for chronic insomniacs like me it's a freakin' godsend. I take it responsibly, see my doctor every few months, and so far I have yet to have one incident in SEVEN YEARS (at 20mg/night for 5 of those, no less). The few nights I skipped it so I could stay up and do some extended traveling, I suffered exactly *zero* withdrawal. You want dependence, try dropping off Effexor. Or booze after using it to try and sleep for a while, and that shiat doesn't even require an RX.

I'm no more dependent on it than I am my Wellbutrin.

It should be clamped down on, it gets handed out like candy, I admit that. But for me, I have yet to hear a downside to my arrangement, as it has far less of an aftermath than seroquel or lunesta, and yes, I've been through every form of sleep modification and counseling you can imagine.

IT. WORKS. If I take it the rest of my life, so what? Is it going to give me cancer? No. Organ failure? No. High blood pressure... oh wait, that's the goddamn robotussin I took a couple of weeks again.

/to quote someone else: "From my cold, sleeping fingers..."
 
2013-01-27 06:10:33 AM  
Here's the rule, folks:

If it's a drug made by a drug company for druggies like Rush Limbaugh to drug themselves with, it's not really a drug--unless it's been bought on the street by a minority; then it becomes a Grave Threat to Humanity, eleventy zillion times worse than the Russian nuclear arsenal and almost as bad as the Evil Weed from the Devil's Garden.

/Floriduh is what America would look like if Big Pharma took over completely
 
2013-01-27 06:18:17 AM  

DrPainMD: cretinbob: This is why I can't get something for my farking back.

You can blame that on people who vote for Democrats or Republicans.


So true. It's the 99% of you voters who keep wasting their votes on the Diet Pepsi or Diet Coke candidates election after election after election who keep this stupid system going in perpetuity. Really, there isn't a whole lotta difference between the Democratic and Republican factions of the Corporate Sell-Out Party. My proposal is to have an eight-foot high gorilla wearing moron-stomping boots standing outside the polling places; anybody foolish enough to waste their vote on the one-party system gets stomped good and hard.

/proud that i'm one of the 0.000000000000000001% who actually voted for a real second party
//go Jill Stein, whoo hoo!
 
2013-01-27 06:28:06 AM  
getting a kick - 3-hr shoulder surgery on 1/22 humeral joint debride, gleneid ladrum repair, SAD mumford RTC tear repair and bicep tendonesis. Awesome nerve block during surgery, 2-day med ball to continue block. Beloved, icy Cryrocuff for post-op pain and 40 diluad (not needed or wanted).

CSS - neice in FL got busted for oxy sales; 3 pain mgmt clinics with "legal" scripts ... gotta love FL
 
2013-01-27 06:38:27 AM  

doglover: Why don't we just legalize recreational drug use?

Then doctors could review your medical records and advise you on the safest ways to get high and how to do so responsibly while pharmacists could legally sell you OTC strength things like marijuana and ecstasy and the really responsible types could get more dangerous things like opium fresh from Afghanistan which would boost their local economy if they could export it legally directly to America they'd finally have money to live a western lifestyle of relative opulence and it would reduce terrorism, end wars, and start to reduce the population once when everyone has pill-dick and can't finish.


Bingo! But God forbid politicians of America accept reality and treat adults like grown-ups. Of course, if you come from a wealthy family (hello politicians) you can easily afford and have access to every and any thing one could want.

A $2,000 hooker (whoops, escort!) doing your dong in the limo after a night at the opera? Good show! A working man getting a $20 head job in the alley because his pig of a wife chooses to pretend the lad has no needs? Oh, arrest that scallywag, fine him big and shame him in public while placing his name on a pervert offender list for life.

I've no doubt the wealthier and more powerful families are the more immoral and debased their tastes run. They are free to drink deeply of the water and the wine, to victimize others for their pleasure and to pressure men of medicine into dispensing them whatever they wish. Merely get the drop on someone and you have them by the jewels, and that's what wealthy/powerful people do.

We the great unwashed are here to be thankful for whatever scraps we may be tossed, pay arrest fines and serve jail time. To suffer in silence, to break our backs in factories and to long for a better life. The sooner Americans wake the hell up and put those firearms they cherish to good use the quicker things can become fair for all.
 
2013-01-27 06:55:18 AM  

doglover: Why don't we just legalize recreational drug use?

Then doctors could review your medical records and advise you on the safest ways to get high and how to do so responsibly while pharmacists could legally sell you OTC strength things like marijuana and ecstasy and the really responsible types could get more dangerous things like opium fresh from Afghanistan which would boost their local economy if they could export it legally directly to America they'd finally have money to live a western lifestyle of relative opulence and it would reduce terrorism, end wars, and start to reduce the population once when everyone has pill-dick and can't finish.


Why?

Because the Right has spent the last half-century or so treating recreational drug use as a moral issue instead of a public health or societal issue. The dogma is that recreational drug use is objectively evil and inherently bad (except when the drug is alcohol or tobacco), and that use of it is a moral weakness and character flaw.

It got worse in the Reagan era, to be sure. Carter was talking about pushing for cannabis legalization, and if he'd gotten re-elected in 1980 that was on his agenda, but instead we got "Just Say No" Reagan and the "War on Drugs", but the conservatives had been railing against the evils of drugs for a lot longer. Go back and watch some of the 1960's version of Dragnet, and see Jack Webb delivering the 1969 version of a "Just Say No" anti-drug lecture about how bad drugs are.

From a purely logical standpoint, prescription drugs are probably the best for recreational use: they have a known strength, purity and dose and well documented and generally understood effects. However, the law is that's illegal, which means our law enforcement agencies spend a LOT of time and money tracking down pill dealers.

If our drug policy was changed to say make cannabis legal like tobacco and alcohol (i.e. regulated, taxed and commercially traded) and allow for recreational use of opiates under medical supervision, then I'd say the overall crime rate in the US (including violent crime) would probably drop sharply, prison populations would plummet, and it would go a long way to improving the quality of life in America.

. . . but that won't happen. Too many people have too much invested in keeping it a "moral' issue. Not the least of which is the drug dealers, who would be out of business if their Federal price supports were repealed and everybody could get their highs easily and legally at Walgreens and CVS.
 
2013-01-27 07:28:33 AM  
I've heard several stories about this lately - all of them breathless and hysterical. It's sounds like the Authoritarians are ramping up for another "crackdown" on pain relief, and another delightful round of making pain patients suffer in the name of puritanism. Go, U.S.A.
Number f**king one.
Whoopee.
 
2013-01-27 07:37:24 AM  
What we need is a national healthcare database, so docs and pharmacies can look up patient records and see that Mr. Smith really did break his back 10 years ago and 5 states over. But noooo, patient privacy! Especially for politicians and celebrities,actually. They don't really give a damn about everyone else.
 
2013-01-27 07:40:15 AM  

jso2897: I've heard several stories about this lately - all of them breathless and hysterical. It's sounds like the Authoritarians are ramping up for another "crackdown" on pain relief, and another delightful round of making pain patients suffer in the name of puritanism. Go, U.S.A.
Number f**king one.
Whoopee.


I am hardly hysterical. Before we severely limited the amount we carried, my pharmacy was filling something like 50 scripts per day. (And we are a low volume store) Every single one for 180 oxycodone 30mg or 360 percocet 10/325. Every single script written by the same three doctors. Every single script with the EXACT same diagnosis code for lower back pain.

If you want people with legitimate chronic pain to stop having a hard time finding medication, crack down on the damned pill-mills. And the U.S.A is number f**king one. We are number one in the world for the consumption of opioid analgesics per capita by a ridiculous margin.
 
2013-01-27 07:45:38 AM  

gingerjet: Thunderboy: Yes, we're all different, and feel pain differently, but we're living in a culture driven by addiction and the products that feed those addictions, and it's upsetting to see so many people caught up in it.

Still not a good reason to punish good doctors or limit access to a drug just because a small percentage are abusing it.


I agree, which is why I never said anything to the contrary.
 
2013-01-27 07:48:46 AM  

Thunderboy: I agree, which is why I never said anything to the contrary.


Wait. That didn't make any sense.

Just ... I agree.
 
2013-01-27 07:55:56 AM  
FTFA:
The sheriffs office says pain management centers in Sarasota are already required to used the date base before writing a prescription

A computer datin' base?
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-01-27 09:01:00 AM  
Who cares? Drug companies get more money to research new drugs, doctors get to pay off their student loans, drug dealers on the street can't peddle as much smack cut with corn starch, and less people get put in prisons. Bring on the pain clinics and add marijuana too.
 
2013-01-27 09:51:37 AM  

teto85: Rush's sister? Wife? Drag persona?


Sorry Michelle, but that was a long time ago. Please go wash the sand out.

webpages.charter.net
 
2013-01-27 09:55:01 AM  

Commander_Neckbeard: I refuse to take any kind of narcotic analgesic for fear of addiction. I've taken them twice, once after I had my wisdom teeth out, (I took one pill and didn't really need that) and once when I broke down during a sinus infection and took one offered to me by my wife, felt very very guilty after that. I won't touch them anymore at all, and I'm hoping that I can keep singing that tune if I'm in pain.


You're not going to win any medals for putting yourself through serious pain.

This is where I get hung up. Is rx pain med abuse a problem? Absolutely. Are people addicted and wasting what could be an otherwise healthy life? Yes

But there is another group of people. People living with blinding farking pain. People who do need a metric farkton of meds to ease that misery. People who are treated like druggie shiatheads for it. Some people seem to think those people using too many meds are bad too. "They're addicted." Well, so what? They're not going to be contributing much to society living with that much pain anyways. Why should they be made to suffer? This isn't the Middle Ages.
 
2013-01-27 09:55:07 AM  

Gyrfalcon: cretinbob: This is why I can't get something for my farking back.

This is exactly why.


I know it is. The stuff that works isn't even a controlled substance, but has "opioid like " properties so the doctors won't give it to me, or give me very much if they do. I can't afford a new MRI (last one is almost 8 years old) to show how bad the arthritis has gotten, so it's pretty much "fark you".
This is what I hope changes next year.
It's the 21st century and assholes like this can be tracked and dealt with.

(thisiswhywecan'thavenicethingscat.jpg)
 
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