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(Time)   Good news everyone. We are all now officially alcoholics   (healthland.time.com) divider line 36
    More: Unlikely, electronic medical records, professor emeritus, alcohol abuse, DSM, Virginia Commonwealth University, legal burden of proof, alcoholisms  
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12917 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 Jan 2013 at 12:49 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-26 01:31:29 AM
4 votes:
My name is biyaaatci and I'm an alcoholic. For real. A few things here- IMHO, drinking alone, by itself, does not make one an alcoholic, but it is one of the lines that the vast majority of alcoholics cross on their way to becoming one. It's arbitrary, but it's a common enough theme that it becomes part of the tune most of us sing. It was one of the things I told myself was normal in order to justify my own behavior. I'm not one to tell anyone they have a problem. That's for you to decide. But at some point we alcoholics all question whether or not we are and most of us lie to ourselves and begin to do things we said we'd never do and make excuses as to why it's okay to do that. In my case, I began to drink in the car and hide booze from my family to enjoy at times I was alone and wouldn't be hassled over it. I began lying to myself and others about what I was doing and making excuses for my behavior. That was when I felt I crossed the line from problem drinking to alcoholism. I never missed work, or stole, or beat my wife, or anything like that, but I was causing problems for myself and others and my actions were endangering people. In short, I couldn't be trusted to do the right thing.

In my case, this study shows exactly where I feel I crossed the line. The occasional binge became more frequent. I could still quit for long periods of time. If someone told me I couldn't drink for a week or a month or whatever, I could do it. But when the pressure was off I'd eventually go back to dangerous behavior. I don't think I was ever physically dependent, but the psychological dependence was so strong that if I didn't quit entirely, I'd have gotten there.

I also thought it was awesome that the smartest post I've seen so far in this thread was posted by a person who uses "beer4breakfast" as a handle.
2013-01-26 12:10:47 AM
4 votes:

jaylectricity: I guess the real response I have is, how does one move down the ladder?


No idea. It just happens so often it's a good idea to always watch yourself.

I drink alone sometimes, too. Most do.

But it's a slippery slope. Not one of those fake political ones where legalizing gay marriage means the president will force your children to marry farm animals, but a real slippery slope many people fall down and die. For reals.

I know people who have had a drinking problem. Those folks went from a glass to a bottle to a case. Every one of 'em.

Other people never go down that road.

The alone thing is just a rule of thumb. It's a good indicator, with all the social pressures, that anyone who gets drunk on their own will be drinking too much.
2013-01-26 01:05:54 AM
3 votes:

jaylectricity: So I was just wondering something and then I saw this thread and figured this would be a great place to ask my question.

Why is drinking alone supposed to be a bad thing? Do NOT say, "Because that means you have a problem."

I want to know why drinking alone suggests you have a problem.


I think that only extroverts think this. On Fark we all know that drinking is a good thing---those of use who are introverts also know that being alone is a good thing, and therefore, that drinking alone is a good thing.
2013-01-26 01:04:28 AM
3 votes:
jaylectricity: I want to know why drinking alone suggests you have a problem.

I think that this, like so many things, got over-generalized. Some alcoholics drink alone to avoid anyone seeing or commenting on their drinking. If you're hiding your drinking, you probably have a drinking problem (or an overzealous neo-prohibitionist in the vicinity).

But just having a few drinks while alone isn't necessarily a problem. Plenty of people have some wine with dinner or a few beers while watching the game when they're alone. It doesn't make them problem drinkers.

I've heard people claim that if you're the only one drinking when you're with anyone else that also means you have a problem It's also BS. The fact that I want a glass of wine and my husband doesn't is not indicative of a drinking problem. It's indicative of wanting a glass of wine.

The basic definition of addiction is continuing use despite negative consequences.
2013-01-26 12:49:32 AM
3 votes:

jaylectricity: doglover: The alone thing is just a rule of thumb. It's a good indicator, with all the social pressures, that anyone who gets drunk on their own will be drinking too much.

That's closer to the kind of answer I'm looking for. I'm wondering if anybody has something better.


There are no hard and fast rules in addiction, but the exceptions prove the generalizations.

Personally, I find my intake as much as quintuples if I drink alone because I have to get drunk enough I'm not lonely. That's why I'm quitting for a while. It's a common enough theme in other people's stories I've heard. Other people are fine.

The best way to solve the problem is get a family. Then you're not alone and can stop drinking as a stopgap to the emptiness.
2013-01-25 11:59:42 PM
3 votes:

doglover: jaylectricity: I want to know why drinking alone suggests you have a problem.

Because when you're not out with people and there's no one to talk to or other things to do, you wind up moving down the ladder from functional to non-functional.


Why would having 100 milliliters of bourbon while watching an intelligent documentary mean you have a problem? Why would having 4 beers while watching that documentary mean you have a problem?

Why couldn't a person have a few drinks, build a fire, get rid of some old furniture in their backyard, then cook dinner for their spouse?

I guess the real response I have is, how does one move down the ladder?  You basically just said, "You can't drink alone because you'll end up having a problem." I asked why. You answered with nonsense.

You just said exactly what I said not to say. "Hurr durr because you have a problem."
2013-01-26 01:51:51 AM
2 votes:
Im not an alcoholic Im a drunk. Alcoholics go to meetings
2013-01-26 01:37:25 AM
2 votes:

biyaaatci: My name is biyaaatci and I'm an alcoholic.


Hi biyaaatci. Thanks for sharing.

But at some point we alcoholics all question whether or not we are and most of us lie to ourselves and begin to do things we said we'd never do and make excuses as to why it's okay to do that. In my case, I began to drink in the car and hide booze from my family to enjoy at times I was alone and wouldn't be hassled over it.

You and I have much in common.

/7 months in AA. 6 days sober.
//Progress, not perfection.
2013-01-26 12:59:09 AM
2 votes:
When one drinks socially there are reasons to drink moderately. Social pressures help keep one in check. When one is by themselves there are no social pressures. There's no need to converse with anyone, If one has an addictive personality that likes to keep going then it's easy to see why people who drink alone may get themselves into trouble.
2013-01-26 12:55:16 AM
2 votes:
We're rapidly approaching the time when needing to breathe will be called "air addiction syndrome" and called a disease.
2013-01-26 11:36:20 AM
1 votes:

jaylectricity: So I was just wondering something and then I saw this thread and figured this would be a great place to ask my question.

Why is drinking alone supposed to be a bad thing? Do NOT say, "Because that means you have a problem."

I want to know why drinking alone suggests you have a problem.


You're not really drinking alone if it's with your good buddy Wiser, Your pal Jack Daniels and his partner Jimmy Beam, or with yer pal Johnny Walker and his brother black and red.
2013-01-26 08:49:15 AM
1 votes:
By that definition I have a major ice cream problem. "I'll just take one spoonful then put it back...ohhh that was good maybe one more. Wow this ice cream is quite excellent! Maybe just a bit more. I think my mouth is numb from cold, I'm putting this down. Well, maybe I should just finish this damn thing so I don't eat more of it..."

2.bp.blogspot.com
2013-01-26 07:51:47 AM
1 votes:

Fuggin Bizzy: You and I have much in common.
/7 months in AA. 6 days sober.
//Progress, not perfection.


fuggin bizzy, good luck to you. You are one of my faves, and by Montana standards, practically a neighbor.
It takes a while. I didn't sober up until a few years after rehab. Several tries in AA....but once I figured it out, I had it. The desire went away and I never drank again. It really happens.

Torqueknot: CSB time:
I got a bunch of pamphlets on the effects of binge drinking and one for AA and was sent home with a lecture on no more drinking or I will die. It turns out I had pancreatitis and ended up back in the hospital the following Monday. I ended up staying there for three days.
My point? Lie when they ask. It may save you thousands of dollars.


Most people who get pancreatitis are serious, hard-core drinkers. Just saying. My cousin has almost died from it, but he keeps on drinking. Just not as much. it will kill you, and there isn't much they can do to treat it. Except the person has to quit farking drinking.

So try to cut them some slack on this one--I think it's unusual to have pancreatitis if you're not a heavy drinker. And yes, of course alcoholics lie like crazy about how much they drink.
2013-01-26 05:39:36 AM
1 votes:
shiat like this is retarded because it not only over diagnoses people for treatment they don't need, but can drive away people who do need treatment because they figure the Dr. is full of shiat classifying everyone as having a problem.

Also there's the issue that trying to paint with a broad brush means that treatment will be ineffective. There's different things that need to be done for a binge drinker and an alcoholic. If someone is hurting their health because they like to party too hard, but are not addicted to alcohol the treatment is different than someone who has an actual addiction. In both cases consuming too much alcohol is harming their health/life/etc but the reasons it is happening is different and thus the treatment is different.

This would be like seeing two people who are hobbling, one because they've broken their leg and the other because they are missing their leg below the knee, and suggesting that the problem is the same and a prosthetic is what is needed.
2013-01-26 05:29:38 AM
1 votes:

supersucker: Personally, I find my intake as much as quintuples if I drink alone because I have to get drunk enough I'm not lonely. That's why I'm quitting for a while. It's a common enough theme in other people's stories I've heard. Other people are fine.

The best way to solve the problem is get a family.


Depends on the family. Since I got divorced, I no longer feel the need to drink. I'm much less lonely now that I'm alone.
2013-01-26 04:46:00 AM
1 votes:
The issue with classification and diagnosis of problem drinking is all in definition, in medicine and psychiatry.

There are multiple definitions of binge drinking currently, problem one. There is no "official" one, but depends on the leanings of the health care provider.

In one, binge drinking is 4 or more drinks on one occassion for females, 5 for males. The problem is, what is an occassion? A wedding? Saturday?

Another definition has added a time...2 hours, which gets closer to a more objectively measured criterion.

But niaaa only says that binge drinking is a pattern of drinking which raises bac to .08, and then references the above number if drinks AND time only as a correspondence.

If a male of average height and weight drinks a six pack over a long sunday afternoon of sports watching, say noon to 7, he may technically be "binge drinking" on one definition, but not others (time, BAC).

Another male of average height and weight may toss four consecutive shots of 100 proof whisky, raising bac above .08 within the time period, but not above the defined number of drinks according to another definition.

Ambiguity is not definition, and for this reason, a better definition is needed if consensus is to be reached.
2013-01-26 04:44:23 AM
1 votes:
I think that drinking alone normalizes drinking as part of the every day, all the time routine. If it's a possibility all the time, then it may just become something you want / need to do all the time.

Coming from a long, long line of alcoholics and more recently, reformed alcoholics, I've found one piece of advice to keep, whether it makes sense or not. Don't drink to get drunk or even buzzed. Drink when it's part of a dinner or hanging out with friends, but never, ever drink with the sole purpose of drinking until it feels good.
2013-01-26 03:58:15 AM
1 votes:
CSB time:

About five years ago, on a Friday afternoon, before I had any drinks, I ended up in the emergency room because I had a mild case of jaundice( I didn't notice it, but my friends did). One of the first things they ask you, when in the emergency room, is how much do you drink? I made the mistake of telling the truth and I said l normally drink four or five beers on Fridays when I go out with my friends. That apparently classified me as a binge drinker. I got a bunch of pamphlets on the effects of binge drinking and one for AA and was sent home with a lecture on no more drinking or I will die. It turns out I had pancreatitis and ended up back in the hospital the following Monday. I ended up staying there for three days.

My point? Lie when they ask. It may save you thousands of dollars.
2013-01-26 03:01:58 AM
1 votes:

tinfoil-hat maggie: rynthetyn: James F. Campbell: Hmph. It's getting so that every time you see a doctor and you admit to having a drink or two once every three or four weeks, they'll start grilling you as if you're an alcoholic.

I think you're exaggerating, my doctor told me that drinking more red wine would be good for me.

/law school is bad for my liver though

It all depends on the doctor you go to. I no longer admit drinking to most of mine.

/I went to the emergency room on a holiday one night and the nurse asked me how many drinks I had had I told her(It wasn't many, I think 4) and she asked me how long I had been binge drinking.


Had a similar experience...but, as obnoxious as some ER staff might be about that sort of thing, I really wouldn't recommend the non-disclosure route. Some meds that they will give you in the ER, if they mix with alcohol in the blood, could hurt or kill you.

Take the lecture, laugh about it later. Walk out alive.

My 2 cents.
2013-01-26 02:57:01 AM
1 votes:
Im an Alcoholic . . . and I am getting a kick out of this
2013-01-26 02:16:26 AM
1 votes:
And the DSM-V is STILL better reading than Fifty Shades of Grey.
2013-01-26 02:00:13 AM
1 votes:
For what it's worth, I don't think drinking alone necessarily means you are at greater risk, or have more of a drinking problem. Some people recharge by having fun in a group, and drinking makes it more fun. But for others, being around other people is exhausting. It doesn't relax them, it saps their energy. It feels like work.

That's me. I like to drink alone for the same reasons that other people like to drink in a group. And I'm not lonely: happily married, two kids, good job, blah blah blah. Just not very social.

So that's how it is for me. Maybe that's not how it is for you though. Be careful.
2013-01-26 01:54:38 AM
1 votes:

James F. Campbell: Hmph. It's getting so that every time you see a doctor and you admit to having a drink or two once every three or four weeks, they'll start grilling you as if you're an alcoholic.


Why are you talking to a doctor? Quacks, all of them!

anyhoo, they have to expand the definition, so it seems like there is a bigger problem, so they can get more funding and more patients for insurance companies to pay for treatement for.

They did it with diabetes, morbid obesity, poverty... all kinds of things. If your epidemic is growing fast enough to be profitable, change the definition.
2013-01-26 01:43:24 AM
1 votes:
Hmph. It's getting so that every time you see a doctor and you admit to having a drink or two once every three or four weeks, they'll start grilling you as if you're an alcoholic.
2013-01-26 01:40:30 AM
1 votes:

Fuggin Bizzy: 7 months in AA. 6 days sober.


Keep coming back.
2013-01-26 01:35:32 AM
1 votes:
i0.kym-cdn.com
2013-01-26 01:33:22 AM
1 votes:

jaylectricity: Why is drinking alone supposed to be a bad thing?


I think if you drink with people, you're probably drinking because of some special event - Super Bowl, wedding, promotion, whatever. Plus there are social controls in place when you're around others. Piss yourself and throw up in the ficus tree in front of your friends/relatives/associates, and there are real-world consequences.

If you're drinking alone it can be surprisingly easy to invent reasons to drink...which can lead to drinking all the time for no reason. Piss yourself and throw up in the ficus tree at home, and who cares? You can clean up, and nobody will ever know.
2013-01-26 01:30:36 AM
1 votes:
Well, not anymore. Not since this pesky cirrhosis I got at 34.

/sober 3 years
//misses Sierra Nevada pale ale
2013-01-26 01:12:56 AM
1 votes:
Need moar beer, then red the tfa tits
2013-01-26 01:06:38 AM
1 votes:
I'm not an alcoholic, I'm a professional.
I'm from Wisconsin.
2013-01-26 01:01:24 AM
1 votes:
I don't see a huge problem with this, and I'm a pretty heavy drinker.

It's not several diseases with clear delineated parts. It's a spectrum between 'I will drink every day or get DTs' to 'drinks in excess occasionally despite knowing that it's a poor choice'. It's better to see it and treat it as such.
2013-01-26 12:56:21 AM
1 votes:
FTFA: "Many young people who get into early trouble because of substance abuse never become dependent and shouldn't be lumped together with long term addicts." This may become especially problematic under the Affordable Care Act, which increases screening for alcohol problems that could pick up these mild cases and leave them on the patient's electronic medical record.

And a lifetime of dealing with those annoying people who tell you you're an alcoholic in denial.
2013-01-26 12:34:56 AM
1 votes:

MaudlinMutantMollusk: I'm not drinking alone

/there are dozens of Farkers drinking with me


I agree with that. I think we've established that over the years. You're not drinking alone if you're drinking and interacting with internet strangers. But I suppose that doglover might say that you're drinking anonymously with drunken strangers.
2013-01-26 12:32:16 AM
1 votes:
I'm not drinking alone

/there are dozens of Farkers drinking with me
2013-01-26 12:13:07 AM
1 votes:

doglover: The alone thing is just a rule of thumb. It's a good indicator, with all the social pressures, that anyone who gets drunk on their own will be drinking too much.


That's closer to the kind of answer I'm looking for. I'm wondering if anybody has something better.
2013-01-25 10:48:23 PM
1 votes:
So I was just wondering something and then I saw this thread and figured this would be a great place to ask my question.

Why is drinking alone supposed to be a bad thing? Do NOT say, "Because that means you have a problem."

I want to know why drinking alone suggests you have a problem.
 
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