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(BGR)   You have 1 week left to "jailbreak" your under-contract smartphone, or any tablet, before it becomes a felony under the DCMA   (bgr.com) divider line 56
    More: PSA, DCMA, smartphones  
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16751 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 Jan 2013 at 6:43 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2013-01-25 05:34:05 PM
9 votes:
i'm so glad we let corporations write our laws...that was such a wonderful idea.
2013-01-25 05:00:02 PM
6 votes:
Ownership has always been a myth.
2013-01-25 06:47:14 PM
5 votes:
Or, you know, you could just get an Android device and not have to worry about jailbreaking...
2013-01-25 06:05:50 PM
5 votes:

doyner: Weaver95: i'm so glad we let corporations write our laws...that was such a wonderful idea.

Corporations are people, my friend.


Cant we execute a few, just to prove that point?
2013-01-25 07:31:53 PM
4 votes:

gingerjet: RoyFokker'sGhost: Or, you know, you could just get an Android device and not have to worry about jailbreaking...

Wait - Android device owners don't jailbreak their phones?  I thought it was the only way to make an Android phone usable?


Jailbreaking on Android is very different than jailbreaking on iOS. Speaking from my own experience, I have an Android phone (HTC) and an Android tablet (Transformer), and I've never had a problem with taking off anything factory installed that I don't want; like the digital copy of 'Green Hornet' that came pre-installed on my phone. You hook it up directly via USB to your computer and mount it as a removable drive. No farking around with iTunes. If I'm goign to a game convention, I can put PDFs of the game books on my tablet directly. I swap out the music on my phone directly. The only need to jailbreak an Android phone is to install custom apps that aren't in the Google Play store, and I haven't found an app I've wanted to install that isn't there.

Now, the downside, for the paranoid, is that it's all extremely interconnected with Google. You're hooked up with your Gmail and Amazon accounts, but you can still use other email services and online stores; there's just direct links already installed for Google's stuff. The big advantage, though, is that I can make changes on one device and it gets updated on the other device.

Bottom line, Google treats you like a rational, reasonable adult.
2013-01-25 08:02:03 PM
3 votes:

MrEricSir: Or you could buy a phone that's already unlocked at avoid any of this.


I'm not sure I can justify $500 for a PHONE when I can buy a laptop for nearly the same price and have a lot more functionality.
2013-01-25 07:17:27 PM
3 votes:
2013-01-25 06:01:45 PM
3 votes:
news.cnet.com

I'm perfectly happy with my DumbPhone.
2013-01-25 05:34:48 PM
3 votes:

Weaver95: i'm so glad we let corporations write our laws...that was such a wonderful idea.


Corporations are people, my friend.
2013-01-25 10:55:35 AM
3 votes:
There is a difference between being able to unlock the cell phone to use with a different carrier then jailbreaking or rooting your phone subtard.
2013-01-25 09:26:49 PM
2 votes:

bhcompy: In Europe you generally buy the phone outright, so it is unlocked. This is the case in the US if you buy the phone outright, as well. This is in regards to getting a subsidized phone from a carrier.


False.

Source: I currently live in an EU country. You do not, I can tell because you z your s's.

Phones are sold outright yes, they are also available subsidised from carriers. Removing the SIM lock requires nothing more than a phone call, all carriers will unlock at the end users request; however some may charge for this service especially if it's still under contract.
2013-01-25 08:05:45 PM
2 votes:

MrEricSir: Or you could buy a phone that's already unlocked at avoid any of this.


I think most people would do this if more providers gave discounts on the cost of service for BYOD plans. But most don't, or the discount is insignificant. And sometimes they even throw in a surcharge because they want you to sign a longterm contract.

Then you have a handful of carriers that won't even accept unlocked devices on their networks.
2013-01-25 07:29:00 PM
2 votes:

gingerjet: RoyFokker'sGhost: Or, you know, you could just get an Android device and not have to worry about jailbreaking...

Wait - Android device owners don't jailbreak their phones?  I thought it was the only way to make an Android phone usable?


Rooted mine about three hours after I got it.  Only way to install Wireless Tether without paying Sprint's outrageous fee for the service.  Also the only way to remove the NFL bloatware and all that other crapola.
2013-01-25 06:53:47 PM
2 votes:

alwaysjaded: There's no way to get rid of or at least block all that bloatware on my phone, is there. I would root but I just know I'll be in that small percent that bricks their phone. That crap is sucking way too much battery life.


In the UK you can buy a phone from Carphone Warehouse. They're a huge phone retailer and all their stock is unbranded so they can sell you a phone on any network. I even upgraded my phone in there and got a nice new, factory fresh, HTC with no network bloat and not locked to any network. As a bonus for Android you get the software updates far quicker as well because you get the stock factory update without having to wait for the network to come up with one.

But even a locked phone can still be legally unlocked easily, with or without your networks okay.
2013-01-25 06:49:54 PM
2 votes:

fusillade762: Weaver95: i'm so glad we let corporations write our laws...that was such a wonderful idea.

Ugh, no shiat. This BS is illegal in Europe, iirc.


In Europe you generally buy the phone outright, so it is unlocked. This is the case in the US if you buy the phone outright, as well. This is in regards to getting a subsidized phone from a carrier.
2013-01-25 06:10:24 PM
2 votes:
Imagine if cars were done that way. There would never have been a custom car ever.
2013-01-27 02:00:29 AM
1 votes:
The flip of this is that the software the companies put ON the phones interferes with their functionality and thus violate FCC.
2013-01-26 11:40:00 AM
1 votes:
The law is specifically that you cannot bypass security encryption on a device.

If your phone has an unlocked bootloader (Some android phones) then rooting is still perfectly legal.

If your phone has a locked bootloader that must be bypassed to root, then it will be considered illegal to root that device.

Apple fans are bared from jailbreaking their devices, as doing so requires you bypass Apple's security.

Unlocking the SIM to use your phone on another network will also be illegal, as it requires you to circumvent the carrier's security lock on the SIM.
2013-01-26 11:32:22 AM
1 votes:

Turbo Cojones: have to constantly justify their existence by making noise


hehehe yea possibly

// what was the point of your post ?
/ or any post including this one
2013-01-26 11:28:51 AM
1 votes:

MrEricSir: ajgeek: MrEricSir: Or you could buy a phone that's already unlocked at avoid any of this.

I'm not sure I can justify $500 for a PHONE when I can buy a laptop for nearly the same price and have a lot more functionality.

Good luck web browsing while walking down the street, taking photos, and making calls with your laptop.


This...WTF is wrong with people who can't just WALK DOWN THE STREET without playing with some BS toy? Don't tell me it's "multi-tasking" because every one of these conversations is along the lines of "what ya doin'?" "Ummm, nuttin', you"? It's almost as if some people were afraid to be alone, or they have to constantly justify their existence by making noise.

Herd instinct?
2013-01-26 09:51:55 AM
1 votes:

LavenderWolf: People wouldn't be able to use their service if they didn't have a phone; a $700 barrier to entry would stop most people.


More like, people wouldn't be able to have a nice, $700 phone every year.

Their service is to provide the infrastructure. You can use a road in your Ferrari or your Ford Probe, and you can use the mobile network with a $25 phone or a $700 phone. There are no barriers to entry, just people wanting shiny new toys.
2013-01-26 09:06:05 AM
1 votes:
o_O

Was this thread bumped? It says "posted to Main » on 26 Jan 2013 at 6:43 AM" but it was up yesterday evening (first non-TF post 2013-01-25 06:47:14 PM).
2013-01-26 08:59:47 AM
1 votes:
This is bull.

I used to have a motorola bag phone that could be unlocked to listen to cell phone conversations, and although the actual listening may have been illegal the unlocking was perfectly legal. The only reason this is out there is because people were getting arounf bullshiat telcom monopolies. WHY THE fark IS OUR GOVERNMENT PASSING LAWS TO ENFORCE A MONOPOLY WHEN TRUST ARE ILLEGAL!?!

It also proves I was right about the DMCA in that it was purposfully written so vague. People were saying "god this could make reprograming your phone illegal." to which they would hear "Aw that's silly, why would they use it like that?" It will be used and interpited whenever such hacking impedes someone making a buck. In this case they can't say it's illegal to take YOUR PHONE to another carrier and get service with them, so instead they say it's illegal to unlock said phone to be used with third party service.

*sigh*
Hypnozombie
2013-01-26 08:57:52 AM
1 votes:

doyner: Weaver95: i'm so glad we let corporations write our laws...that was such a wonderful idea.

Corporations are people, my friend.


So are thieves.
2013-01-26 07:44:23 AM
1 votes:
/Tracfone, ftw. It talks, it texts, bluetooth, music, wifi, surf the web & etc., all for 200 bucks a year.

As God is my witness, in a previous job with a place that sold phones, I've had more than one Tracfone customer try to exchange the phone because they couldn't get a dial tone. They were usually very very old.
2013-01-26 07:37:17 AM
1 votes:

doyner: Ownership has always been a myth.


That's the modern business model: Leasing and "selling" imaginary things.
Can I sell you an opinion?

/Tracfone, ftw. It talks, it texts, bluetooth, music, wifi, surf the web & etc., all for 200 bucks a year.
2013-01-26 06:57:07 AM
1 votes:

Bisu: It'd be nice if they did that with their search engine.


Their news feed, too... at this point, all I can say is that I honestly believe Fox News is paying Google for placement.
2013-01-26 06:52:09 AM
1 votes:
When you keep electing lawyers to represent you, you get what you deserve.
2013-01-26 06:12:15 AM
1 votes:
It's not enforeceable at all -- they will use this law to go after websites with unlocking instructions and tools.
2013-01-26 04:13:03 AM
1 votes:

gaspode: bhcompy: fusillade762: Weaver95: i'm so glad we let corporations write our laws...that was such a wonderful idea.

Ugh, no shiat. This BS is illegal in Europe, iirc.

In Europe you generally buy the phone outright, so it is unlocked. This is the case in the US if you buy the phone outright, as well. This is in regards to getting a subsidized phone from a carrier.

Never bought a phone in Europe, was ALWAYS given it free on contract (except in the early 90s). Almost everyone I know has the same.


Okay, let me explain something to you.

Your phone was not free.

Cell phone carriers are not in the business of handing out free phones. They are in the business of providing a service, and if subsidizing a phone for you (i.e. paying the full price, sometimes more than $700) means you provide a long-term revenue stream for them, they're going to do it. So they buy the phone, and give it to you under a contract, stating that you're going to be with that company for X period of time (2-3 years usually). This is how they make money.

People wouldn't be able to use their service if they didn't have a phone; a $700 barrier to entry would stop most people.
2013-01-26 03:43:51 AM
1 votes:
I'm not sure if it's because I've been drinking or because it's late, but I don't see the problem requiring a user to finish their contract or pay the cancellation fee before authorizing rooting a phone. As much as the major carriers piss me off, they DO have large capital costs that need to be covered and predictable revenue streams make for a more smooth business cycle.

If another Farker would care to explain what I'm missing, I'd appreciate it.

/Yes, they telecoms are assclowns, but they're a necessary degree of assclowns
2013-01-26 02:37:45 AM
1 votes:
I'm glad I don't have these problems..I don't have a cell phone, much less a smart phone. Simplicity
is more important to me than being accessible or watching cat videos while I wait for my tacos.
2013-01-25 10:52:06 PM
1 votes:

viscountalpha: Dokushin: viscountalpha: Dokushin: This has nothing to do with jailbreaking or rooting. Jesus, no one reads anymore.

This concerns the process of unlocking your SIM lock, meaning you can use the phone on other networks. Rooting, flashing, and jailbreaking remains legal.

Your the one who didn't read. It specifically limits jail-breaking. They are targeting people abusing the system though for profit. But it could be slapped on someone if they are looking for someone breaking the law.

So, No. It's not legal.

Okay, we'll dance. Citation of gaining root access on iOS becoming illegal?

I didn't say root-access? No I didn't. Did you go read the actual document? NO! you didn't or you could cite out why JAIL BREAKING is causing issues.

Since your a lazy moron and I have to point out what I'm referencing,

Link

ffs, GBOD.


Do you know what "jailbreaking" means? Here, I'll help, since words are hard.

Wikipedia on Jailbreaking: Jailbreaking permits root access to the iOS operating system, allowing the download of additional applications, extensions, and themes that are unavailable through the official Apple App Store.

As I already said, this has nothing to do with the legislation in question, which targets acquisition of cellphones at subsidized prices and "unlocking" them (removing the SIM lock) so that they may be used on other networks (associated with companies that did not pay the subsidy).
2013-01-25 10:34:51 PM
1 votes:

Weaver95: i'm so glad we let corporations write our laws...that was such a wonderful idea.


What did people think would happen when they decided that essentially unlimited government power was a good thing? It should have been clear that instead of just ignoring their job to defend people's rights those in the government would just start having their corporate friends create the laws outright.
2013-01-25 10:02:16 PM
1 votes:

Dokushin: This has nothing to do with jailbreaking or rooting. Jesus, no one reads anymore.

This concerns the process of unlocking your SIM lock, meaning you can use the phone on other networks. Rooting, flashing, and jailbreaking remains legal.


Your the one who didn't read. It specifically limits jail-breaking. They are targeting people abusing the system though for profit. But it could be slapped on someone if they are looking for someone breaking the law.

So, No. It's not legal.
2013-01-25 09:22:12 PM
1 votes:
This has nothing to do with jailbreaking or rooting. Jesus, no one reads anymore.

This concerns the process of unlocking your SIM lock, meaning you can use the phone on other networks. Rooting, flashing, and jailbreaking remains legal.
2013-01-25 08:48:48 PM
1 votes:
Mine is ok

From AT&T web site:

AT&T will unlock an iPhone under the following circumstances:

•The person requesting the unlock is:
◦A current AT&T customer, or
◦A former AT&T customer who can provide the phone number or account number for the account.
•The iPhone was designed for use on the AT&T network.
•All contract obligations, including any term commitment, associated with the device to be unlocked have been fully satisfied.
•The iPhone has not been reported lost or stolen
2013-01-25 08:31:13 PM
1 votes:

Amos Quito: [farm3.staticflickr.com image 640x428]

I am so screwed.


You can dial by tapping the switch hook. Tap 10 times to get the operator.
2013-01-25 08:20:35 PM
1 votes:

ajgeek: MrEricSir: Or you could buy a phone that's already unlocked at avoid any of this.

I'm not sure I can justify $500 for a PHONE when I can buy a laptop for nearly the same price and have a lot more functionality.


I don't know if you can justify $500 for a laptop when you can get a desktop for nearly the same price and have a lot more functionality.

Seriously though, that $200-300 price break on the phone isn't free; it's just added int your $1600/2yr contract. They're not discounted, they're subsidized.
2013-01-25 08:10:56 PM
1 votes:

MrEricSir: ajgeek: MrEricSir: Or you could buy a phone that's already unlocked at avoid any of this.

I'm not sure I can justify $500 for a PHONE when I can buy a laptop for nearly the same price and have a lot more functionality.

Good luck web browsing while walking down the street, taking photos, and making calls with your laptop.


A friend of mine has the Galaxy Note II and jokingly refers to it as his laptop because of its size.
2013-01-25 08:05:51 PM
1 votes:

ajgeek: MrEricSir: Or you could buy a phone that's already unlocked at avoid any of this.

I'm not sure I can justify $500 for a PHONE when I can buy a laptop for nearly the same price and have a lot more functionality.


Good luck web browsing while walking down the street, taking photos, and making calls with your laptop.
2013-01-25 07:55:04 PM
1 votes:

impaler: If it's "under contract" what difference does it make if I unlock it to use with another carrier? I still have to pay for my contract right?

What's the issue here?


ETF = $350
2 year contract = $1250-3750

There's your issue. The carrier doesn't really want the ETF. They're not in the business of selling phones. They're in the business of selling service. They want your $50-150 per line per month for the service for the full length of their contract.
2013-01-25 07:51:42 PM
1 votes:

Flint Ironstag: alwaysjaded: There's no way to get rid of or at least block all that bloatware on my phone, is there. I would root but I just know I'll be in that small percent that bricks their phone. That crap is sucking way too much battery life.

In the UK you can buy a phone from Carphone Warehouse. They're a huge phone retailer and all their stock is unbranded so they can sell you a phone on any network. I even upgraded my phone in there and got a nice new, factory fresh, HTC with no network bloat and not locked to any network. As a bonus for Android you get the software updates far quicker as well because you get the stock factory update without having to wait for the network to come up with one.

But even a locked phone can still be legally unlocked easily, with or without your networks okay.


I'll try to do something like that when my contract runs out. I have a Galaxy S2 with T-Mobile and everything is tied in with their worthless software. *sigh*
2013-01-25 07:48:35 PM
1 votes:
So is subby the idiot or the greenlighter?

Jailbreaking is not unlocking, and vice versa. Very humored by the commenters who also don't know the difference.

/but its still bullshiat.
2013-01-25 07:41:38 PM
1 votes:
Is January 26 a week from now, submitter? Are you from the past?
2013-01-25 07:38:14 PM
1 votes:

RoyFokker'sGhost: Bottom line, Google treats you like a rational, reasonable adult.


Which has absolutely nothing to do with any of this. It's the wireless carriers, not Google, trying to tie the phones down. The rooting/jailbreaking distinction is irrelevant. Anything that can permit you to unlock your phone will be illegal without carrier permission.

We're not talking about OS freedom/flexibility, we're talking about network freedom/flexibility.
2013-01-25 07:20:22 PM
1 votes:

will_2679: There is a difference between being able to unlock the cell phone to use with a different carrier then jailbreaking or rooting your phone subtard.


Repeating because apparently some people missed the top post in the thread.

BlackArt: So how will they know *when* we unlock our phones? (Mine are all unlocked now. OS replaced as well.)


It probably allows them to start going after sites who post directions on how to unlock and make available any tool used to do so.
2013-01-25 07:12:40 PM
1 votes:

impaler: If it's "under contract" what difference does it make if I unlock it to use with another carrier? I still have to pay for my contract right?

What's the issue here?


Best I can figure is if you travel to Europe and don't want to pay for a cheapo dumbphone over there, but instead would like to use your iPhone 5 which is still under contract with AT&T, you're going to be paying boatloads of roaming costs, and I'm sure AT&T is just thrilled to have you do so.
(Verizon iPhone 5's are unlocked out of the box no matter what because of a specific FCC rule regarding the frequencies they use. Probably other LTE phones, too.)

Otherwise, the way I read it, you're right... The ETF would apply if you leave early, at which point it's no longer illegal. Same goes for an expiring contract... So it seems to be a very small percentage of users it would affect.
2013-01-25 07:10:27 PM
1 votes:
Someone needs to test the law and provoke a prosecution.

That could be a very, very entertaining jury trial.

Stupid laws have to be provoked.
2013-01-25 07:07:52 PM
1 votes:

RoyFokker'sGhost: Or, you know, you could just get an Android device and not have to worry about jailbreaking...


Wait - Android device owners don't jailbreak their phones?  I thought it was the only way to make an Android phone usable?
2013-01-25 07:03:31 PM
1 votes:
When Cyanogenmod is outlawed, only outlaws will have Cyanogenmod.
2013-01-25 06:59:40 PM
1 votes:
Yeah, good luck with the shiatstorm of negative PR you'll get from suing paid customers.
2013-01-25 06:01:37 PM
1 votes:

Weaver95: i'm so glad we let corporations write our laws...that was such a wonderful idea.


Ugh, no shiat. This BS is illegal in Europe, iirc.
2013-01-25 05:37:00 PM
1 votes:
There's a difference between "You have one week before this is illegal", and "This becomes illegal next week".

That's some fine reading comprehension there, submittard.
2013-01-25 05:14:28 PM
1 votes:
There's no way to get rid of or at least block all that bloatware on my phone, is there. I would root but I just know I'll be in that small percent that bricks their phone. That crap is sucking way too much battery life.
2013-01-25 11:55:40 AM
1 votes:
If it's "under contract" what difference does it make if I unlock it to use with another carrier? I still have to pay for my contract right?

What's the issue here?
 
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