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(Daily Mail)   Finally a houseplant that even a Farker couldn't kill, assuming you remember to water it every 50 years   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 39
    More: Cool, seedlings, Fark, photosynthesis, thriving, chemical industry, gardens, Royal Horticultural Society, Nigel Colborn  
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7741 clicks; posted to Geek » on 25 Jan 2013 at 2:46 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-25 02:49:35 PM
That's actually really cool. I want to do that. Put it on my desk or something by the window.

Quick question to Fark gardeners: I have double-paned low-e windows; do they let in enough magic whatever to make the plants not die? I would assume so, but I have literally zero experience growing plants.
 
2013-01-25 02:54:40 PM
I wonder what the air inside that thing is like.  It has to be pretty pure oxygen by now.

/Obviously not a science type guy so explain it to me.
 
2013-01-25 02:55:50 PM
I killed a cactus after having it for 1 week. I could kill it.
 
2013-01-25 03:00:33 PM

stupiddream: I wonder what the air inside that thing is like.  It has to be pretty pure oxygen by now.

/Obviously not a science type guy so explain it to me.


Plants release CO2 just like we do through cellular respiration.
 
2013-01-25 03:04:53 PM

stupiddream: I wonder what the air inside that thing is like.  It has to be pretty pure oxygen by now.

/Obviously not a science type guy so explain it to me.


If you read the panel included in the article, it contains a detailed explanation of how that works and where the CO2 comes from.

But RTFA is haaaaaaaaard....
 
2013-01-25 03:08:50 PM

stupiddream: I wonder what the air inside that thing is like.  It has to be pretty pure oxygen by now.

/Obviously not a science type guy so explain it to me.


Plants absorb CO2, and release O2. The soil compost absorbs the O2 and releases CO2. I'd say it's probably exactly the same ratio as it was when he capped it.
 
2013-01-25 03:08:52 PM
I'm more interested about the critters in the soil.... the bacteria, nematodes, and such. How have they evolved in such a resource-limiting environment?
 
2013-01-25 03:13:53 PM
That is so cool. Adding to my bucket list.
 
2013-01-25 03:18:34 PM

Lord Dimwit: That's actually really cool. I want to do that. Put it on my desk or something by the window.

Quick question to Fark gardeners: I have double-paned low-e windows; do they let in enough magic whatever to make the plants not die? I would assume so, but I have literally zero experience growing plants.


No problem with the low-e windows. The insulation is based upon a low conductivity gas layer between the glass panes and the coating block UV and IR. In fact, you probably don't want too much light. It will eutrophy.

stupiddream: I wonder what the air inside that thing is like.  It has to be pretty pure oxygen by now.

/Obviously not a science type guy so explain it to me.


Not even. The reason this plant survives is because there are some heterotrophs in there too - nibbling on the leaves/roots and breathing the O2 out of the air. The CO2 they respire gets grabbed by the plant and used in photosynthesis. That bottle is a living biosphere of plant and animal life.


I have one too, but it is all liquid. I sealed it in 1991 when I was in college and I still have it. Algae, snails, insects + numerous microscopic creatures all live happily together. Give it a little light and don't let it get cold. It will find a balance quickly.

here are some examples:
With shrimp!
Corporate
 
2013-01-25 03:28:49 PM
The secret is in the compost. If he had used a sterile soil, the plant would have died a long time ago.
 
2013-01-25 03:29:34 PM
I'd love to see that done with store bought potting soil instead of his compost and see how long it lasts.

//It's not magic, but goddamn, living soil is pretty amazing stuff compared to what you can buy from the store.
 
2013-01-25 03:29:51 PM
Now that's pretty farkin' cool right there.


madgonad: I have one too, but it is all liquid. I sealed it in 1991 when I was in college and I still have it. Algae, snails, insects + numerous microscopic creatures all live happily together. Give it a little light and don't let it get cold. It will find a balance quickly.

here are some examples:
With shrimp!
Corporate


....aaaand I have a new project to consider now. Awesome links mate. I wonder if a carefully prepared and sealed fish-tank could support a huge version of these...
 
2013-01-25 03:30:09 PM
So close to an amazing simul-post!
 
2013-01-25 03:30:43 PM
Wonder how small you could do these. I have a few extra Mason jars lying around...
 
2013-01-25 03:33:48 PM

madgonad: here are some examples:
With shrimp!
Corporate


my mom had one of the shrimp ones, but a winter power outage killed it
 
2013-01-25 03:42:17 PM

NkThrasher:
....aaaand I have a new project to consider now. Awesome links mate. I wonder if a carefully prepared and sealed fish-tank could support a huge version of these...


I used an old 6 liter graduated cylinder that had a two decade layer of dust on it. My professor said I could have it when I was talking about making one. It is almost as simple as getting some gravel, mud, and water from a local pond and adding some extra chemicals to provide a reservoir of materials for both the plants and animals. Sealed with plastic and wax paper. It looks like a nasty algal mess, but you can see the tiny snails and other invertebrates nibbling on the algae and moss. I never thought about putting a magnet inside so that an external magnet could be used to help keep the sides clean. The snails do a fair job of it, but it is never pristine and the water is always a bit cloudy. Good luck with the project. Oh, and NEVER put it in direct sunlight. Mine is near a window on the north side of the house and has always been happy.
 
2013-01-25 03:47:47 PM
That's so cool. I have a fiddle-leaf fig that refuses to die despite the horrible treatment I give it. Its tenacity is actually a huge inspiration to me.
 
2013-01-25 03:51:53 PM

pjbreeze: I killed a cactus after having it for 1 week. I could kill it.


I've killed plants and found out they were plastic. I accept this plant's challenge.
 
2013-01-25 04:05:44 PM
 
2013-01-25 04:22:37 PM
Crackers Are a Family Food pjbreeze: I killed a cactus after having it for 1 week. I could kill it.

I've killed plants and found out they were plastic. I accept this plant's challenge.


My mother's killed both cacti and silk/plastic. This plant doesn't stand a chance in her house.
 
2013-01-25 04:24:12 PM
FTFA: "After that, he greased the bung so it wedged in tightly..."

go on...
 
2013-01-25 04:55:12 PM
I've had a 5-gal glass carboy sealed with a pothos vine growing in it for about 15 years now. Every few years I do open the top to trim the plant a little. But that's it, and it looks pretty cool (the glass is still clean)...
/csb
 
2013-01-25 05:42:22 PM
Maybe his wife waters it when he's not home.
 
2013-01-25 06:07:02 PM
My wife and I have a pathos we bought in early 1989. I fertilize it once a year in the spring, and water it once a month, letting it get thoroughly dried out between watering.

ecohomeresource.com

We have a corn plant we bought at the same time that is also still thriving.

0.tqn.com

/file photos...not my actual plants
 
2013-01-25 06:09:22 PM
Covers Mars in a glass globe.
Put in some bacteria, nematodes, and such.
Some seeds

Profit
 
2013-01-25 06:25:36 PM
Woe to whoever tries to open my terrarium. I dropped a fat deuce in it ten years ago and sealed it tight.

I can still see it in there, just barely.
 
2013-01-25 07:59:36 PM

Stone Meadow: We have a corn plant we bought at the same time that is also still thriving.


Corn plants and their relatives (the dracaena family) are what I recommend to my not so green thumbed friends who want a houseplant.

Put them where they get indirect light and water them every other week, or at least once a month. About the only way to kill them is to water them too much.

This one is dracaena "lemon lime". How cute is that?.

dl.dropbox.com

There are dracaena with quite a few different leaf colors, My go to housewarming gift is to buy a couple of different colors at different heights and repot them all into one large attractive pot.
 
2013-01-25 10:04:24 PM

BullBearMS: Stone Meadow: We have a corn plant we bought at the same time that is also still thriving.

Corn plants and their relatives (the dracaena family) are what I recommend to my not so green thumbed friends who want a houseplant.

Put them where they get indirect light and water them every other week, or at least once a month. About the only way to kill them is to water them too much.

This one is dracaena "lemon lime". How cute is that?.

[dl.dropbox.com image 500x500]

There are dracaena with quite a few different leaf colors, My go to housewarming gift is to buy a couple of different colors at different heights and repot them all into one large attractive pot.


Yep, they're easy plants to keep. I see no reason mine cannot go another 25 years with the same care they've had for the past 25.
 
2013-01-25 10:05:43 PM
I can't even keep plants alive in my Animal Crossing shanty. :(
 
2013-01-25 10:10:18 PM
I got a potted plant a few weeks ago on an impulse. I don't get enough light in my apartment for it, and now I'm keeping under it's own lamp.

I figure it's practice for taking care of something.
 
2013-01-25 11:39:16 PM

stupiddream: I wonder what the air inside that thing is like.  It has to be pretty pure oxygen by now.

/Obviously not a science type guy so explain it to me.


Just think of the bacteria, and maybe little spiders and other insects.... evolving in ways we don't know... cut off from Earth's normal environments.... ANYTHING could be possible....

What if someone were to break the bottle?

Would make an interesting end of the world story.
 
2013-01-25 11:59:34 PM

Contents Under Pressure: stupiddream: I wonder what the air inside that thing is like.  It has to be pretty pure oxygen by now.

/Obviously not a science type guy so explain it to me.

If you read the panel included in the article, it contains a detailed explanation of how that works and where the CO2 comes from.

But RTFA is haaaaaaaaard....


you're not under pressure, you're under the "I'm a lonely dick" sign
 
2013-01-26 01:00:14 AM

Intelligent_Donkey: stupiddream: I wonder what the air inside that thing is like.  It has to be pretty pure oxygen by now.

/Obviously not a science type guy so explain it to me.

Plants release CO2 just like we do through cellular respiration.


No, that's backwards.

The other processes involved convert it back to CO2 for the plant to breathe in. For example, rotting of shed plant parts, and the respiration of O2->CO2 by bacteria in the soil.
 
2013-01-26 04:03:05 AM
www.1worldglobes.com

I've got one of these. I have had it for the past 8 years and there is still 1 shrimp alive. Algae is doing well, and all I have to do is use a magnet to clean it about once a month, if that.
 
2013-01-26 04:08:48 AM

SearchN: [www.1worldglobes.com image 400x471]

I've got one of these. I have had it for the past 8 years and there is still 1 shrimp alive. Algae is doing well, and all I have to do is use a magnet to clean it about once a month, if that.


I have got a serious want for one of these. Thinking of ordering the biggest one they have.
 
2013-01-26 12:03:50 PM
Kandor?
 
2013-01-26 02:32:02 PM
"After that, he greased the bung so it wedged in tightly..."

images.sodahead.com
 
2013-01-26 05:56:50 PM

BullBearMS: Stone Meadow: We have a corn plant we bought at the same time that is also still thriving.

Corn plants and their relatives (the dracaena family) are what I recommend to my not so green thumbed friends who want a houseplant.

Put them where they get indirect light and water them every other week, or at least once a month. About the only way to kill them is to water them too much.

This one is dracaena "lemon lime". How cute is that?.

[dl.dropbox.com image 500x500]

There are dracaena with quite a few different leaf colors, My go to housewarming gift is to buy a couple of different colors at different heights and repot them all into one large attractive pot.


the pub here has one, and damned if the kids haven't done a good job of trying to kill it.

I might have to rescue it!

we have a couple of tall corn stalks at home that are some 30 years old. and considering that at one time they served as a littler box for a senile cat, never got hardly any attention, got to the brink of death completly chopped down from 10+ feet tall down to two, and are back up to five feet now.. I would say that they are fairly hardy house plants.
 
2013-01-26 07:00:08 PM

Cerebral Knievel: the pub here has one, and damned if the kids haven't done a good job of trying to kill it.

I might have to rescue it!

we have a couple of tall corn stalks at home that are some 30 years old. and considering that at one time they served as a littler box for a senile cat, never got hardly any attention, got to the brink of death completly chopped down from 10+ feet tall down to two, and are back up to five feet now.. I would say that they are fairly hardy house plants.


They really are tough as nails. Leaving the saucer under the pot full of water is about the only way to kill one. They can get by on pretty darn low light that would have other plants kicking the bucket.

They are also one of the easiest plants in the world to root. You can lop off the top foot of a spike and shove it in a pot of potting soil and keep it moist and it will root and take off. As a bonus, another spike (or more than one) will grow out of the stump of the one you chopped off.

You can get some really pretty stuff going on when you buy several different kinds at different heights and rip them apart and repot them in a large attractive pot. They are so tough, I've never seen one die from rough treatment in repotting. There are so many cool leaf colors that you can get some really nice combinations going.

dl.dropbox.com

The only wimpy thing about them is that they really hate chlorine in their water. It makes the tips of the leaves die. If your town adds a lot of chlorine, either use rain water, bottled water, or just leave tap water sitting out in a pitcher or watering can for a couple of days so the chlorine gas will have time to dissipate out of the water before you use it.
 
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