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(The Register)   Cisco divides by zero and sells Linksys to Belkin   (theregister.co.uk) divider line 91
    More: Interesting, Aaron Belkin, Linksys, Measuring instrument  
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3258 clicks; posted to Business » on 25 Jan 2013 at 11:25 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



91 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-01-25 10:16:31 AM  
"And the damndest thing is , I can live with that. I can live with that. I CAN live with that."

www.thechoad.com
 
2013-01-25 11:25:19 AM  
I've been trying to think of fun things I can do to my neighbor who's running a Linksys router with all the default configs.  Would changing the SSID to "Belkin" be too subtle?
 
2013-01-25 11:29:56 AM  
And then they sang a song about thongs.
 
2013-01-25 11:35:32 AM  
They can call it Linkin. I don't think that's taken.
 
2013-01-25 11:36:44 AM  

serial_crusher: I've been trying to think of fun things I can do to my neighbor who's running a Linksys router with all the default configs.  Would changing the SSID to "Belkin" be too subtle?


My co-worker thought it would be funny to name his new router "Completely_Unhackable". A week later, he saw that it had been changed to "Challenge_Accepted".
 
2013-01-25 11:46:24 AM  
That stuff's only good for frying chicken and makeshift anal lube anyway.
 
2013-01-25 12:03:34 PM  

pkellmey: serial_crusher: I've been trying to think of fun things I can do to my neighbor who's running a Linksys router with all the default configs.  Would changing the SSID to "Belkin" be too subtle?

My co-worker thought it would be funny to name his new router "Completely_Unhackable". A week later, he saw that it had been changed to "Challenge_Accepted".


You. Magnificent. Bastards.

Awesome both of you.
 
2013-01-25 12:08:00 PM  

pkellmey: serial_crusher: I've been trying to think of fun things I can do to my neighbor who's running a Linksys router with all the default configs.  Would changing the SSID to "Belkin" be too subtle?

My co-worker thought it would be funny to name his new router "Completely_Unhackable". A week later, he saw that it had been changed to "Challenge_Accepted".


My router's name is "CommunityPornServer" and I made the password ridiculously easy to guess. Then, I just watch the traffic and boot my freeloading neighbors when they're doing something important.

And, it's fun to get a glance of what they do online.
 
2013-01-25 12:24:32 PM  

Shazam999: They can call it Linkin. I don't think that's taken.


It's all fun and games until someone writes the Booth Virus.

/Sic Semper Tyrannis!
 
2013-01-25 12:25:34 PM  
i.imgur.com

Here's what Linksys and Belkin and Netgear and D-Link and all the other $30 plasticy, chintzy, sweat shop grade, locking up every few hours garbage ass routers can all go do with themselves.
 
2013-01-25 12:44:39 PM  
@theurge14: I haven't yet found a Linksys or Belkin router that didn't start losing its mind after a 1-2 years of heavy residential usage (200-400 GB per month WAN, 500 GB - 1 TB per month LAN). Probably failing capacitors as a result of running too hot.

My next router will be ASUS (the model I'm looking at has a big-ass heatsink inside) and if that dies then I'm taking the leap to Sonicwall.
 
2013-01-25 12:52:28 PM  

F1_Fan: @theurge14: I haven't yet found a Linksys or Belkin router that didn't start losing its mind after a 1-2 years of heavy residential usage (200-400 GB per month WAN, 500 GB - 1 TB per month LAN). Probably failing capacitors as a result of running too hot.

My next router will be ASUS (the model I'm looking at has a big-ass heatsink inside) and if that dies then I'm taking the leap to Sonicwall.


thinking about getting an ASUS myself. Know if they work well with dd-wrt firmware?
 
2013-01-25 12:57:07 PM  
Considering that Cisco made a reputation for themselves as a networking and infrastructure company, they really managed to kill what good was left in Linksys when they bought it. Just like they did with Flip Video.

TheAlmightyOS: thinking about getting an ASUS myself. Know if they work well with dd-wrt firmware?


I have the Asus RT-N66R. Yes, it should work with DD-WRT.
 
2013-01-25 12:58:45 PM  

Shazam999: They can call it Linkin. I don't think that's taken.


Sadly, the first thing I thought of when I read that.
 
2013-01-25 01:05:06 PM  
How is the Asus ones?
 
2013-01-25 01:07:01 PM  

RexTalionis: Considering that Cisco made a reputation for themselves as a networking and infrastructure company, they really managed to kill what good was left in Linksys when they bought it. Just like they did with Flip Video.

TheAlmightyOS: thinking about getting an ASUS myself. Know if they work well with dd-wrt firmware?

I have the Asus RT-N66R. Yes, it should work with DD-WRT.


Flip video was a stupid buy, concieved of by people who didn't see the progress of mobile tech. Then they put the flip ceo in charge of linksys and he killed all the projects he didn't like and jumped out the window with his golden parachute after eighteen months leaving smoking wreckage behind.
 
2013-01-25 01:09:18 PM  

drjekel_mrhyde: How is the Asus ones?


Excellent. If you're willing to pay for the premium, that is.
 
2013-01-25 01:09:37 PM  
I have an Ubiquiti Routerstation Pro that's about 3 years old and sitting in my unfinished basement. It's taken a bit of a beating and is covered in cobwebs but I think it's going to run forever. Paid a boatload for it ($150) but runs OpenWRT perfectly.

They're not being made anymore, but if you can find one on ebay, it's worth picking up.

/no wireless on board, you have to get a minipci card and antennas to do that
 
2013-01-25 01:11:38 PM  

RexTalionis: Considering that Cisco made a reputation for themselves as a networking and infrastructure company, they really managed to kill what good was left in Linksys when they bought it. Just like they did with Flip Video.

TheAlmightyOS: thinking about getting an ASUS myself. Know if they work well with dd-wrt firmware?

I have the Asus RT-N66R. Yes, it should work with DD-WRT.


Nice. Thanks for the info. I have been looking at a RT-N66U. Knowing that I think I want to pick one up now.

People say the stock firmware is great after update but I got dd-wrt on all my other routers. There is something to be said about having one uniform interface across your whole network.
 
2013-01-25 01:19:09 PM  

TheAlmightyOS: RexTalionis: Considering that Cisco made a reputation for themselves as a networking and infrastructure company, they really managed to kill what good was left in Linksys when they bought it. Just like they did with Flip Video.

TheAlmightyOS: thinking about getting an ASUS myself. Know if they work well with dd-wrt firmware?

I have the Asus RT-N66R. Yes, it should work with DD-WRT.

Nice. Thanks for the info. I have been looking at a RT-N66U. Knowing that I think I want to pick one up now.

People say the stock firmware is great after update but I got dd-wrt on all my other routers. There is something to be said about having one uniform interface across your whole network.


The RT-N66R (which is the same thing as the N66U, except it had a separate SKU because it is sold at brick and mortar retailers instead of online) has some really neat features in its stock firmware. For example, it gives you 2 USB ports and gives you the option to use a 3G or 4G cellular data adapter (you know, the kind that plugs into laptops for portable data) in case the regular network fails.
 
2013-01-25 01:22:40 PM  

F1_Fan: @theurge14: I haven't yet found a Linksys or Belkin router that didn't start losing its mind after a 1-2 years of heavy residential usage (200-400 GB per month WAN, 500 GB - 1 TB per month LAN). Probably failing capacitors as a result of running too hot.

My next router will be ASUS (the model I'm looking at has a big-ass heatsink inside) and if that dies then I'm taking the leap to Sonicwall.


WTH are you doing with your routers, installing it above a heating duct? I had a netgear I used for about 5 years, with only a few restarts here and there. Upgraded to a Linksys w/ gig ports and I've been using that flawlessly for about 2.5 years.
 
2013-01-25 01:26:50 PM  

RexTalionis: TheAlmightyOS: RexTalionis: Considering that Cisco made a reputation for themselves as a networking and infrastructure company, they really managed to kill what good was left in Linksys when they bought it. Just like they did with Flip Video.

TheAlmightyOS: thinking about getting an ASUS myself. Know if they work well with dd-wrt firmware?

I have the Asus RT-N66R. Yes, it should work with DD-WRT.

Nice. Thanks for the info. I have been looking at a RT-N66U. Knowing that I think I want to pick one up now.

People say the stock firmware is great after update but I got dd-wrt on all my other routers. There is something to be said about having one uniform interface across your whole network.

The RT-N66R (which is the same thing as the N66U, except it had a separate SKU because it is sold at brick and mortar retailers instead of online) has some really neat features in its stock firmware. For example, it gives you 2 USB ports and gives you the option to use a 3G or 4G cellular data adapter (you know, the kind that plugs into laptops for portable data) in case the regular network fails.


I also heard it has something called "optware". Basically software modules you can install to add functionality like basic ftp and html servers. Very interested to see that in action. That and a USB HDD enclosure would completely replace the Athlon box I keep around for NAS and FTP
 
2013-01-25 01:33:28 PM  

Kimpak: WTH are you doing with your routers, installing it above a heating duct? I had a netgear I used for about 5 years, with only a few restarts here and there. Upgraded to a Linksys w/ gig ports and I've been using that flawlessly for about 2.5 years.


I have nothing but problem with consumer-grade routers and modems as well. The modem provided by Comcast (one of those little square, gray, fanless boxes) was down to strugging to maintain 1 Mbps downstream within 6 months. I've gone through 3 modems in 5 years. Had a Linksys that finally failed after about a prior 3 years of us, lost the decent Netgear modem that replaced it when the wall wort failed and fried it, the $40 Netgear PoS I replaced it with the same day couldn't go more than 2 or 3 days at most without the radio shutting off for no apparent reason and now I'm back to the original Netgear model hoping that the wall wort is better quality.

I do not understand why it's so hard to get a quality wifi router and cable modem in this country. I cannot be the only person out there who is concerned with more than just getting the lowest possible price...
 
2013-01-25 01:35:20 PM  
Derp... that second round of products (Linksys and Netgear stuff) is a list of wifi routers that failed, not modems.

So in 5 years I've had 4 routers and 2 modems.
 
2013-01-25 01:35:33 PM  

TheAlmightyOS: RexTalionis: TheAlmightyOS: RexTalionis: Considering that Cisco made a reputation for themselves as a networking and infrastructure company, they really managed to kill what good was left in Linksys when they bought it. Just like they did with Flip Video.

TheAlmightyOS: thinking about getting an ASUS myself. Know if they work well with dd-wrt firmware?

I have the Asus RT-N66R. Yes, it should work with DD-WRT.

Nice. Thanks for the info. I have been looking at a RT-N66U. Knowing that I think I want to pick one up now.

People say the stock firmware is great after update but I got dd-wrt on all my other routers. There is something to be said about having one uniform interface across your whole network.

The RT-N66R (which is the same thing as the N66U, except it had a separate SKU because it is sold at brick and mortar retailers instead of online) has some really neat features in its stock firmware. For example, it gives you 2 USB ports and gives you the option to use a 3G or 4G cellular data adapter (you know, the kind that plugs into laptops for portable data) in case the regular network fails.

I also heard it has something called "optware". Basically software modules you can install to add functionality like basic ftp and html servers. Very interested to see that in action. That and a USB HDD enclosure would completely replace the Athlon box I keep around for NAS and FTP


I haven't messed around with it much yet, but it does have a built in DLNA and Samba server as well as a USB print server built in to the stock firmware. There is a USB installer for additional modules, but I don't have anything installed on it yet.
 
2013-01-25 01:37:10 PM  

Shazam999


They can call it Linkin. I don't think that's taken.


The domain's been Parked.
 
2013-01-25 01:39:09 PM  
Looks like its netgear for me.. although I'll check out asus on my next purchase. Or anything else that pops up on radar. Personally I can't think of any other router brands except belkin, netgear, and linksys (rated worst to best in that order).

Ive been happy with my netgear WNDR3400v2 that I picked up early last year. Spent a little money so I can get the whole upper band for my laptop alone (family is on the lower band still with G devices) and was happy to find that unlike every single netgear and linksys I had in the past, this model netgear has not been locking up or the wifi mysteriously becoming unresponsive. It does crash about 2-3 times a month but at least when it does crash, it has no problems rebooting itself (easy to tell cause the huge glowing blue button on the side lights backup). Also I am relying on the portable usb drive I plugged into it way more then I thought I would.
 
2013-01-25 01:40:12 PM  
Asus is a pretty good brand, but I would recommend Ubiquiti. I use some of their access points in enterprise applications, and they work great.
 
2013-01-25 01:45:53 PM  

finnished: Asus is a pretty good brand, but I would recommend Ubiquiti. I use some of their access points in enterprise applications, and they work great.


Have you tried their AirRouter home router?

I ask because my Linksys is on the fritz and I hear good things about Ubiquiti.
 
2013-01-25 01:47:05 PM  

theurge14: [i.imgur.com image 335x333]

Here's what Linksys and Belkin and Netgear and D-Link and all the other $30 plasticy, chintzy, sweat shop grade, locking up every few hours garbage ass routers can all go do with themselves.


Well, I completely agree that Belkin is garbage... I've been boycotting them for years after the BS they gave me for one of their devices. (and that every time I've had to deal with someone else's Belkin crap, it's always a pain).

Linksys is a question of how the mighty has fallen... I've had more Linksys routers and ports/hubs die on me that I'd like to remember (heck I have two dead device at my desk right now). Never again...

I've had a D-Link router that lasted me about a year, and while it worked, it was not too bad, but 1 year is too short a lifespan, so they lost a lot of points for me due to this.

I have a Netgear (N600) at the office right now, and it has been actually excellent... aside the fact that this is the second one as the first one was defective out of the box. But since lemons can happen I was willing to give it another chance and so far (a good 6 months I think) so good.

My D-link at home was replaced with a TP-Link (N750) for about 2-3 months now and it's been quite good... doubled my WIFI transfer speed, as where I had about 6-7MBps with the D-Link, I've gotten up to 15MBps.

I have a Western Digital (N600) still in the box as a backup (exchanged with the D-Link after I did find my receipt), which had good reviews, but unless the TP-Link dies, it's a paperweight.

I have to wonder if this will impact the Apple routers, as most use the Linksys chips. (unless that's changed)
 
2013-01-25 01:50:50 PM  

Vegan Meat Popsicle: I do not understand why it's so hard to get a quality wifi router and cable modem in this country. I cannot be the only person out there who is concerned with more than just getting the lowest possible price...


Most of us have no issues at all with our $30 Netgear or Linksys routers and switches.

I've had my share of cable modems fail. They fail because the TWC signal is too low when it is working, and lightning likes to come down the coax when it is not working.

Frankly, the commercial grade cisco gear my fortune 500 uses fails ten times as much, and in ways that I cannot imagine anyone letting through QA.
 
2013-01-25 01:53:39 PM  

JeffMD: Looks like its netgear for me.. although I'll check out asus on my next purchase. Or anything else that pops up on radar. Personally I can't think of any other router brands except belkin, netgear, and linksys (rated worst to best in that order).

Ive been happy with my netgear WNDR3400v2 that I picked up early last year. Spent a little money so I can get the whole upper band for my laptop alone (family is on the lower band still with G devices) and was happy to find that unlike every single netgear and linksys I had in the past, this model netgear has not been locking up or the wifi mysteriously becoming unresponsive. It does crash about 2-3 times a month but at least when it does crash, it has no problems rebooting itself (easy to tell cause the huge glowing blue button on the side lights backup). Also I am relying on the portable usb drive I plugged into it way more then I thought I would.


That doesn't sound good... no router should need to be rebooted like that. My Netgear here at the office has been on for many months now without a single glitch.

My D-link did as you described for the last month of it's life... kept locking up, then WIFI would no longer work until I rebooted it, then even the ethernet connected machine wouldn't get through....it did it more and more often until one day that no amount of reboots would fix it.
 
2013-01-25 01:57:02 PM  

Vegan Meat Popsicle: Kimpak: WTH are you doing with your routers, installing it above a heating duct? I had a netgear I used for about 5 years, with only a few restarts here and there. Upgraded to a Linksys w/ gig ports and I've been using that flawlessly for about 2.5 years.

I have nothing but problem with consumer-grade routers and modems as well. The modem provided by Comcast (one of those little square, gray, fanless boxes) was down to strugging to maintain 1 Mbps downstream within 6 months. I've gone through 3 modems in 5 years. Had a Linksys that finally failed after about a prior 3 years of us, lost the decent Netgear modem that replaced it when the wall wort failed and fried it, the $40 Netgear PoS I replaced it with the same day couldn't go more than 2 or 3 days at most without the radio shutting off for no apparent reason and now I'm back to the original Netgear model hoping that the wall wort is better quality.

I do not understand why it's so hard to get a quality wifi router and cable modem in this country. I cannot be the only person out there who is concerned with more than just getting the lowest possible price...


Just curious.

How old is the wiring in your home/panel? Any other tech acting a little wierd in your house?

How old is the wires on the street from the power company?

Voltage/frequency changed as low as 5%(guess) can wreak havoc on electronics.

If u have a ups, check to see what tbe incoming voltage/frequency is.

I had some wierd problems until I got a ups and it corrected the frequency to 60hz.
 
2013-01-25 01:57:45 PM  

Vegan Meat Popsicle: Kimpak: WTH are you doing with your routers, installing it above a heating duct? I had a netgear I used for about 5 years, with only a few restarts here and there. Upgraded to a Linksys w/ gig ports and I've been using that flawlessly for about 2.5 years.

I have nothing but problem with consumer-grade routers and modems as well. The modem provided by Comcast (one of those little square, gray, fanless boxes) was down to strugging to maintain 1 Mbps downstream within 6 months. I've gone through 3 modems in 5 years. Had a Linksys that finally failed after about a prior 3 years of us, lost the decent Netgear modem that replaced it when the wall wort failed and fried it, the $40 Netgear PoS I replaced it with the same day couldn't go more than 2 or 3 days at most without the radio shutting off for no apparent reason and now I'm back to the original Netgear model hoping that the wall wort is better quality.

I do not understand why it's so hard to get a quality wifi router and cable modem in this country. I cannot be the only person out there who is concerned with more than just getting the lowest possible price...


well, as with any market there will be cheaply made crap to sell to the uninformed consumers.

Also, have you tried updating the firmware? Not talking about third party firmware (though that helps sometimes) but updates provided by the manufacturer. I 'fixed' a few dropped connection issues for clients simply by updating the firmware
 
2013-01-25 01:59:10 PM  
I guess it's a case of "You get what you pay for".

We have a total of six Dlink DIR-655. 5 as bridges/repeaters (3 of which are outside in all weather enclosure boxes) and 1 as the main connection point to the modem. They have failed, locked up or rebooted a grand total of zero times.

They just keep working and we deployed them pretty close to 6 years ago.

Netgear has always been dogshiat from my experience with about the same reliability record as Belkin.
 
2013-01-25 02:06:42 PM  
@theurge14: I haven't yet found a Linksys or Belkin router that didn't start losing its mind after a 1-2 years of heavy residential usage (200-400 GB per month WAN, 500 GB - 1 TB per month LAN). Probably failing capacitors as a result of running too hot.

I think my oldest WRT54GL is 10 years old now, I have three of them (using two as bridges).

// DD-WRT
 
2013-01-25 02:07:58 PM  

MrEricSir: finnished: Asus is a pretty good brand, but I would recommend Ubiquiti. I use some of their access points in enterprise applications, and they work great.

Have you tried their AirRouter home router?

I ask because my Linksys is on the fritz and I hear good things about Ubiquiti.


I have, although the older version with the antennas. In my experience the biggest day-to-day problem is when you need to reboot a router, because it just stops forwarding traffic. This router never did it, even though I was streaming video, downloading, and even if I had tons of simultaneous connections.
 
2013-01-25 02:09:29 PM  

JeffMD: Looks like its netgear for me.. although I'll check out asus on my next purchase. Or anything else that pops up on radar. Personally I can't think of any other router brands except belkin, netgear, and linksys (rated worst to best in that order).


Buffalo also makes good units.
 
2013-01-25 02:16:13 PM  
i've probably owned a router by all 3 companies at one time or another, and they all broke... so im not really gonna point fingers.
 
2013-01-25 02:19:13 PM  

lordargent: @theurge14: I haven't yet found a Linksys or Belkin router that didn't start losing its mind after a 1-2 years of heavy residential usage (200-400 GB per month WAN, 500 GB - 1 TB per month LAN). Probably failing capacitors as a result of running too hot.

I think my oldest WRT54GL is 10 years old now, I have three of them (using two as bridges).

// DD-WRT


I, too, have a WRT54GL serving as a bridge. For a time, it would lose its connection to the main router until rebooted; the problem was fixed by changing the built-in firmware of the main router to DD-WRT.

My friends wonder why I do not simply run Cat6 from my computer room to my living room.
 
2013-01-25 02:19:51 PM  

lordargent: @theurge14: I haven't yet found a Linksys or Belkin router that didn't start losing its mind after a 1-2 years of heavy residential usage (200-400 GB per month WAN, 500 GB - 1 TB per month LAN). Probably failing capacitors as a result of running too hot.

I think my oldest WRT54GL is 10 years old now, I have three of them (using two as bridges).

// DD-WRT


Now that is not fair and you know it. You can not honestly pull out the WRT54G Series and start comparing it to what this guy has been using. Those things transcend the normal performance and longevity bell curve of your run-of-the-mill routers. They are examples of what home networking should be.

/own 3
//wish they had made an N series of these things
 
2013-01-25 02:20:51 PM  

Kimpak: F1_Fan: @theurge14: I haven't yet found a Linksys or Belkin router that didn't start losing its mind after a 1-2 years of heavy residential usage (200-400 GB per month WAN, 500 GB - 1 TB per month LAN). Probably failing capacitors as a result of running too hot.

My next router will be ASUS (the model I'm looking at has a big-ass heatsink inside) and if that dies then I'm taking the leap to Sonicwall.

WTH are you doing with your routers, installing it above a heating duct? I had a netgear I used for about 5 years, with only a few restarts here and there. Upgraded to a Linksys w/ gig ports and I've been using that flawlessly for about 2.5 years.


I take it out of the box, put it on a table and connect my cables. It is in a spare room with temperature lower than the rest of the house. In fact the heat is turned off and the room warmed by the exhaust fans on my media/game server PC. I have a couple of servers running 24/7, three networked security cameras and maybe 6 other devices using the network at any given time so the router is moving a fair bit of data all the time.

The most recent Belkin i owned (a Vision N1) would just stop passing network traffic at random until I power-cycled it. Before that I had a Linksys (one of those older blue and black ones - no wi-fi) that would randomly ignore random clients. Now my Linksys WRT610N decides to drop wireless connections for a couple of seconds about once a week. That's minorly annoying when the lady asks why her iPad isn't working... it's a major pisser when I'm gaming and get disconnected after an hour of gameplay.
 
2013-01-25 02:21:01 PM  
still rocking a at least 80 year old wrt54g, no trouble with it ever other than the occasional reset

wish i had some other network close enough to play with
 
2013-01-25 02:24:54 PM  

TheAlmightyOS:
// DD-WRT

Now that is not fair and you know it. You can not honestly pull out the WRT54G Series and start comparing it to what this guy has been using. Those things transcend the normal performance and longevity bell curve of your run-of-the-mill routers. They are examples of what home networking should be.


A WRT54G cured my impotence. I have my Doctor on speed dial because I have many erections lasting longer than 4 hours.
 
2013-01-25 02:33:19 PM  

lordargent: @theurge14: I haven't yet found a Linksys or Belkin router that didn't start losing its mind after a 1-2 years of heavy residential usage (200-400 GB per month WAN, 500 GB - 1 TB per month LAN). Probably failing capacitors as a result of running too hot.

I think my oldest WRT54GL is 10 years old now, I have three of them (using two as bridges).

// DD-WRT


I think they made a bad batch.  When the DDWRT craze first started I went out and bought one, and it would crash and reboot itself every 30 seconds.
I took it back and the replacement had the same problem.  So I just gave up on the whole thing.
 
2013-01-25 02:34:53 PM  
TheAlmightyOS: Now that is not fair and you know it. You can not honestly pull out the WRT54G Series and start comparing it to what this guy has been using. Those things transcend the normal performance and longevity bell curve of your run-of-the-mill routers. They are examples of what home networking should be.

I slapped a pair of directional antennae on two of them (there are a lot more wireless networks in the condo complex now than when I moved in over a decade ago).

I had some connection problems and thought they were finally dying. But at some point, I looked at the wireless networks around and realized realized that having the main router at the back of my condo with omnidirectional antennas meant that a decent chunk of my transmission power was going right out the back wall.

Throw on the directional so that the routers are beaming mostly toward each other, and the connection issues went away.
 
2013-01-25 02:34:53 PM  

Caelistis: I guess it's a case of "You get what you pay for".

We have a total of six Dlink DIR-655. 5 as bridges/repeaters (3 of which are outside in all weather enclosure boxes) and 1 as the main connection point to the modem. They have failed, locked up or rebooted a grand total of zero times.

They just keep working and we deployed them pretty close to 6 years ago.

Netgear has always been dogshiat from my experience with about the same reliability record as Belkin.


The mid priced belkins (around 60 bucks) I have not had any problems with. Cheaper than that and they quickly became shooting targets.

my next wifi point will likely be an asus
 
2013-01-25 02:35:26 PM  

thrasherrr: Vegan Meat Popsicle: I do not understand why it's so hard to get a quality wifi router and cable modem in this country. I cannot be the only person out there who is concerned with more than just getting the lowest possible price...

Most of us have no issues at all with our $30 Netgear or Linksys routers and switches.

I've had my share of cable modems fail. They fail because the TWC signal is too low when it is working, and lightning likes to come down the coax when it is not working.


CSB: I was sitting at my desk during a thunderstorm, I saw a huge bolt of lightning come down not too far away, and zap, my cable modem was instantly fried.
 
2013-01-25 02:40:49 PM  

serial_crusher: lordargent: @theurge14: I haven't yet found a Linksys or Belkin router that didn't start losing its mind after a 1-2 years of heavy residential usage (200-400 GB per month WAN, 500 GB - 1 TB per month LAN). Probably failing capacitors as a result of running too hot.

I think my oldest WRT54GL is 10 years old now, I have three of them (using two as bridges).

// DD-WRT

I think they made a bad batch.  When the DDWRT craze first started I went out and bought one, and it would crash and reboot itself every 30 seconds.
I took it back and the replacement had the same problem.  So I just gave up on the whole thing.


dd-wrt is a third party firmware for many different routers. WRT54G is a series of routers made by Linksys that can run dd-wrt firmware.

Now, if you are meaning to say there was a bad release of dd-wrt, there most certainly was. The main website for that firmware still recommends the buggy version. Definitely check the forums before flashing
 
2013-01-25 02:45:51 PM  

TheAlmightyOS: serial_crusher: lordargent: @theurge14: I haven't yet found a Linksys or Belkin router that didn't start losing its mind after a 1-2 years of heavy residential usage (200-400 GB per month WAN, 500 GB - 1 TB per month LAN). Probably failing capacitors as a result of running too hot.

I think my oldest WRT54GL is 10 years old now, I have three of them (using two as bridges).

// DD-WRT

I think they made a bad batch.  When the DDWRT craze first started I went out and bought one, and it would crash and reboot itself every 30 seconds.
I took it back and the replacement had the same problem.  So I just gave up on the whole thing.

dd-wrt is a third party firmware for many different routers. WRT54G is a series of routers made by Linksys that can run dd-wrt firmware.

Now, if you are meaning to say there was a bad release of dd-wrt, there most certainly was. The main website for that firmware still recommends the buggy version. Definitely check the forums before flashing


No, I'm saying the WRT54GL had a bad run.  I attempted to buy a WRT54GL so that I could put dd-wrt on it.  Because the router I had at the time (some Netgear POS) didn't support it.
 
2013-01-25 02:47:21 PM  
serial_crusher: I think they made a bad batch. When the DDWRT craze first started I went out and bought one, and it would crash and reboot itself every 30 seconds.
I took it back and the replacement had the same problem. So I just gave up on the whole thing.


1) The stock firmware is garbage.

2) They made many different WRT models, some of them are garbage.

For general purpose routing, the models to get are a WRT54G (version 1-4), or a WRT54GL (any version)

Version 5+ of the G is where they got rid of Linux (switched to VX Works) and chopped the ram/flash in half. In short, this is the gimp of the WRT line.

The GL is essentially a branch in the model line using the V4 as a base, and they are awesome.

(I don't know much about the other versions as they tend to add weird features (ex, speedboost))
 
2013-01-25 02:50:41 PM  

serial_crusher: TheAlmightyOS: serial_crusher: lordargent: @theurge14: I haven't yet found a Linksys or Belkin router that didn't start losing its mind after a 1-2 years of heavy residential usage (200-400 GB per month WAN, 500 GB - 1 TB per month LAN). Probably failing capacitors as a result of running too hot.

I think my oldest WRT54GL is 10 years old now, I have three of them (using two as bridges).

// DD-WRT

I think they made a bad batch.  When the DDWRT craze first started I went out and bought one, and it would crash and reboot itself every 30 seconds.
I took it back and the replacement had the same problem.  So I just gave up on the whole thing.

dd-wrt is a third party firmware for many different routers. WRT54G is a series of routers made by Linksys that can run dd-wrt firmware.

Now, if you are meaning to say there was a bad release of dd-wrt, there most certainly was. The main website for that firmware still recommends the buggy version. Definitely check the forums before flashing

No, I'm saying the WRT54GL had a bad run.  I attempted to buy a WRT54GL so that I could put dd-wrt on it.  Because the router I had at the time (some Netgear POS) didn't support it.


I should add, the dying every 30 seconds thing happened with both the linksys firmware and dd-wrt.  (IIRC it would only crash when the wifi was enabled, which is what allowed me to actually install dd-wrt without it crashing mid-flash).
 
2013-01-25 03:01:52 PM  

theurge14: [i.imgur.com image 335x333]

Here's what Linksys and Belkin and Netgear and D-Link and all the other $30 plasticy, chintzy, sweat shop grade, locking up every few hours garbage ass routers can all go do with themselves.


What do you suggest as an alternative? Seriously difficult to figure out what to buy.
 
2013-01-25 03:02:43 PM  

lordargent: @theurge14: I haven't yet found a Linksys or Belkin router that didn't start losing its mind after a 1-2 years of heavy residential usage (200-400 GB per month WAN, 500 GB - 1 TB per month LAN). Probably failing capacitors as a result of running too hot.

I think my oldest WRT54GL is 10 years old now, I have three of them (using two as bridges).

// DD-WRT


I think I had one of those. The wireless part worked, but some of the Ethernet ports failed after about three years. I kept it for a while thinking I'd use it as a bridge, but my place is fully covered by my Airport Extreme, so I got rid of it. Hope the Apple hardware lasts 4X as long as other consumer-grade stuff because it cost 4X as much!
 
2013-01-25 03:09:37 PM  

Ed Grubermann: JeffMD: Looks like its netgear for me.. although I'll check out asus on my next purchase. Or anything else that pops up on radar. Personally I can't think of any other router brands except belkin, netgear, and linksys (rated worst to best in that order).

Buffalo also makes good units.


The Buffalo I got to replace my Linksys is still working. My parents inherited it :-) I wasn't aware that they still make Wi-Fi routers because shortly after I bought mine, they were involved in some patent infringement lawsuit (IIRC) and were forced to stop selling them for a while. Just checked their website and looks like they're back in the router business. I like that company; just bought a NAS from them.
 
2013-01-25 03:24:54 PM  

dk47: theurge14: [i.imgur.com image 335x333]

Here's what Linksys and Belkin and Netgear and D-Link and all the other $30 plasticy, chintzy, sweat shop grade, locking up every few hours garbage ass routers can all go do with themselves.

What do you suggest as an alternative? Seriously difficult to figure out what to buy.


Expect to spend anwhere from $70 to $150 for a really good consumer router instead of the $30 Walmart specials or settling for the built in WiFi on that cable modem that the Time Warner guy left at your house.

I've heard really good things about the ASUS RT-N56U, Buffalo WZR-HP-AG300H, Cisco RT-N16, or any of the other Dual-Band DD-WRT based routers. I've got a friend who does alot of console gaming who got the ASUS RT-N16 "gaming router" and loves it.

However if you're like me and you've had it with Bittorrent locking up, games getting DC'd because your router locked up for no good reason, friend's laptops mysteriously not able to authenticate through WPA2 no matter what, you could go all out and (fanboy disclaimer) go for the Apple Airport Extreme. Setup is simple, uptime will be counted in years and it really has no faults.

Good luck whichever way you go. Whatever you decide on you'll notice a difference pretty quickly.
 
2013-01-25 03:29:11 PM  

theurge14: However if you're like me and you've had it with Bittorrent locking up, games getting DC'd because your router locked up for no good reason, friend's laptops mysteriously not able to authenticate through WPA2 no matter what, you could go all out and (fanboy disclaimer) go for the Apple Airport Extreme. Setup is simple, uptime will be counted in years and it really has no faults.


Those Airport Extremes are spendy compared to the usual consumer grade routers out there. I gave mine to a friend because I went the DIY route. He has been battling all kinds of disconnect and restart issues with 3-4 different brands. He's been running the Airport Extreme without any issues for a good 2 years now
 
2013-01-25 03:34:27 PM  

theurge14: you could go all out and (fanboy disclaimer) go for the Apple Airport Extreme. Setup is simple, uptime will be counted in years and it really has no faults.


It's a pretty decent router, but I really wish they hadn't apple'd the configuration tool.  Especially from a Mac, the latest version doesn't let you do much beyond just changing the SSID or password.  The Windows tool is a little more robust, but still not great.

If you want to just plug-and-play and forget, it's a solid choice.  Standard Apple product.
 
2013-01-25 03:37:10 PM  

MightyPez: theurge14: However if you're like me and you've had it with Bittorrent locking up, games getting DC'd because your router locked up for no good reason, friend's laptops mysteriously not able to authenticate through WPA2 no matter what, you could go all out and (fanboy disclaimer) go for the Apple Airport Extreme. Setup is simple, uptime will be counted in years and it really has no faults.

Those Airport Extremes are spendy compared to the usual consumer grade routers out there. I gave mine to a friend because I went the DIY route. He has been battling all kinds of disconnect and restart issues with 3-4 different brands. He's been running the Airport Extreme without any issues for a good 2 years now


I don't recommend it to everyone because not everyone agrees with me that spending $150 on a router is something they need to do. But I personally have had experienced those problems I mentioned above with my old cheap Belkin router. Buddy of mine had an HP laptop with Windows 7 and it just would not connect with WiFi to it. For weeks we had to plug it in wired. Then when I got the Airport Extreme it was on the first time. I also play enough Call of Duty on my XBOX to notice the difference. My neighbor has gone through three cheap routers the entire time I've owned the Airport Extreme and for what he's paid for those he could've just gotten one like mine.
 
2013-01-25 03:38:44 PM  

serial_crusher: theurge14: you could go all out and (fanboy disclaimer) go for the Apple Airport Extreme. Setup is simple, uptime will be counted in years and it really has no faults.

It's a pretty decent router, but I really wish they hadn't apple'd the configuration tool.  Especially from a Mac, the latest version doesn't let you do much beyond just changing the SSID or password.  The Windows tool is a little more robust, but still not great.


Yeah, I agree. You can still download Airport Utility 5.whatever and run it along side the new version when you need to mess with those more "obscure" settings.
 
2013-01-25 03:44:41 PM  
Linksys has always been fairly reliable for me. I have a fairly complex network setup with about 20 hosts.
A linksys WRTGSv4 with DD WRT serves as a VLAN trunking device for me, connecting down into 3 other switches for my phones (TP-link PoE), servers/clients (TP-Link Gig) and Cameras (Linksys 5 port 10/100), and also a ASUS R56 as a WAP.

A linksys WRT160N serves as my edge gateway, and also runs as a VPN tunnel gateway so I can get around GeoIP lockouts. That will be going though, replaced with hopefully a Raspberry Pi, as its 380 MHz processor just can't keep up, only getting me max 4.1 mbps over the VPN. It's been a trooper though, enduring hours of use at 1.50 load.

My only complaint about Linksys was them getting rid of the blue and black form factor. None of my stuff can really stack very well. The 160 has a stupid curved top with the status lights right on top. And the Asus is even more useless in that regards. I wish the companies would realize that this stuff doesn't always have to be pretty or elegant looking. Some of us don't care what our gear looks like when it's stuffed in a closet.

This is a thing of beauty. Modem, Router and Switch:
www.xtremesystems.org
My equivalent setup is hideously ugly.
 
2013-01-25 03:56:21 PM  
My old router died and I needed a new one in a hurry so I just bought the first cheap one I could find until I could get something better. It is a TP-Link, a rather unfortunate name for a company I've never heard of, but that was over a year ago and it still works like a champ. Plus I love the color scheme, so sick of blue routers.
 
2013-01-25 04:01:03 PM  
I have this box thing with lights on it and it does stuff. It was cheap. It hasn't broken.

/leaves nerd thread I'm unqualified to join.
 
2013-01-25 04:10:05 PM  
dd-wrt works great.
 
2013-01-25 04:10:51 PM  
ASUS RT-N16 router here, it takes alot of abuse.

Could bring a linksys or netgear router to its knees very easily with my torrenting but it takes weeks of heavy torrent traffic before the asus starts complaining. Its not perfect, I have needed to reset it a few times from extreme abuse, but that it doesn't melt down entirely is a testament to its ruggedness.

/also, whats up with dd-wrt not updating in two years now?
 
2013-01-25 04:37:30 PM  

JeffMD: Looks like its netgear for me.. although I'll check out asus on my next purchase. Or anything else that pops up on radar. Personally I can't think of any other router brands except belkin, netgear, and linksys (rated worst to best in that order).

Ive been happy with my netgear WNDR3400v2 that I picked up early last year. Spent a little money so I can get the whole upper band for my laptop alone (family is on the lower band still with G devices) and was happy to find that unlike every single netgear and linksys I had in the past, this model netgear has not been locking up or the wifi mysteriously becoming unresponsive. It does crash about 2-3 times a month but at least when it does crash, it has no problems rebooting itself (easy to tell cause the huge glowing blue button on the side lights backup). Also I am relying on the portable usb drive I plugged into it way more then I thought I would.


I been quite happy with my dlink dir 655. About the only thing it hasn't been able to handle is NAT loopback requests which is rather sad, since i run an ftp server and can't use the external ip address when connecting in the LAN network. Other than that it has really good range, spedd, gigabit ports and a decent wireless speed.

Sure it is no Sonicwall, but much cheaper.
 
2013-01-25 04:59:26 PM  

lordargent: @theurge14: I haven't yet found a Linksys or Belkin router that didn't start losing its mind after a 1-2 years of heavy residential usage (200-400 GB per month WAN, 500 GB - 1 TB per month LAN). Probably failing capacitors as a result of running too hot.

I think my oldest WRT54GL is 10 years old now, I have three of them (using two as bridges).

// DD-WRT


You're lucky, within 2 years, I went through 4 of those, and two switchbox (hubs). I gave up on Linksys over a year ago.

And from many reviews and feedback that I looked into when trying to troubleshoot it, I kept finding indications that their failure rate appears to be fairly high.
 
2013-01-25 05:00:53 PM  
That's like pushing to turds together.
 
2013-01-25 05:03:11 PM  

Skyfrog: My old router died and I needed a new one in a hurry so I just bought the first cheap one I could find until I could get something better. It is a TP-Link, a rather unfortunate name for a company I've never heard of, but that was over a year ago and it still works like a champ. Plus I love the color scheme, so sick of blue routers.


Mine:

www.tp-link.in

It's actually the best looking router I've seen.. I like the massive antennas, gives it a bad-ass look.

But cosmetics aside, it's been the best router (performance wise) that I've had... at least so far, and price wise, it was under 100$, at least 20-30$ less than similar models (other brands).
 
2013-01-25 05:04:58 PM  
The one who's been through 3-4 routers in the past few years needs to look at his power source, and get a decent, protecting powerbar between it and the wall.

The home network here is all D-Link, the oldest piece being a DI-604, from around... 2005? Kind of old but doesn't need reboots much. I'm seriously considering getting one of the new Western Digital ones whenever i finally spot a good deal.
 
2013-01-25 05:31:05 PM  

Vegan Meat Popsicle: Kimpak: WTH are you doing with your routers, installing it above a heating duct? I had a netgear I used for about 5 years, with only a few restarts here and there. Upgraded to a Linksys w/ gig ports and I've been using that flawlessly for about 2.5 years.

I have nothing but problem with consumer-grade routers and modems as well. The modem provided by Comcast (one of those little square, gray, fanless boxes) was down to strugging to maintain 1 Mbps downstream within 6 months. I've gone through 3 modems in 5 years. Had a Linksys that finally failed after about a prior 3 years of us, lost the decent Netgear modem that replaced it when the wall wort failed and fried it, the $40 Netgear PoS I replaced it with the same day couldn't go more than 2 or 3 days at most without the radio shutting off for no apparent reason and now I'm back to the original Netgear model hoping that the wall wort is better quality.

I do not understand why it's so hard to get a quality wifi router and cable modem in this country. I cannot be the only person out there who is concerned with more than just getting the lowest possible price...


It might be problems with your house's electrical system. How old is your house?
 
2013-01-25 05:33:26 PM  

the opposite of charity is justice: ASUS RT-N16 router here, it takes alot of abuse.

Could bring a linksys or netgear router to its knees very easily with my torrenting but it takes weeks of heavy torrent traffic before the asus starts complaining. Its not perfect, I have needed to reset it a few times from extreme abuse, but that it doesn't melt down entirely is a testament to its ruggedness.

/also, whats up with dd-wrt not updating in two years now?


check the forums. While the website has not been updated the actual firmware has. It is very deceiving. I don't know why but it seems the forum and the website are controlled by two different entities with those controlling the website being lazy as fark.

If i do remember correctly, the version that the website indicates is the "current" one is actually a very buggy build and can cause all sorts of problems
 
2013-01-25 05:51:34 PM  

Mokmo: The one who's been through 3-4 routers in the past few years needs to look at his power source, and get a decent, protecting powerbar between it and the wall.

The home network here is all D-Link, the oldest piece being a DI-604, from around... 2005? Kind of old but doesn't need reboots much. I'm seriously considering getting one of the new Western Digital ones whenever i finally spot a good deal.


For me, all computers and devices are plugged into a UPS, so power isn't the issue and my location is on top of a bookshelf next to a n open area, so it's getting plenty of air circulation... And as far as the Linksys routers, they were purchased from different stores at different times, and at two locations (home and at the office), either plugged in UPS or high quality power bar with power filtering... so power and air circulation aren't factors.
 
2013-01-25 06:09:04 PM  

RexTalionis: Considering that Cisco made a reputation for themselves as a networking and infrastructure company, they really managed to kill what good was left in Linksys when they bought it. Just like they did with Flip Video.

TheAlmightyOS: thinking about getting an ASUS myself. Know if they work well with dd-wrt firmware?

I have the Asus RT-N66R. Yes, it should work with DD-WRT.


DD-WRT is buggy, hasn't been developed in years, and their support team is full of dicks.

If you're going to flash your router, use OpenWRT. The last feature I asked for was in the development branch within 2 days.
 
2013-01-25 06:11:45 PM  

dk47: com image 335x333]

Here's what Linksys and Belkin and Netgear and D-Link and all the other $30 plasticy, chintzy, sweat shop grade, locking up every few hours garbage ass routers can all go do with themselves.

What do you suggest as an alternative? Seriously difficult to figure out what to buy.


I'd suggest Cradlepoint routers. But I used to work there so, I'm biased.
 
2013-01-25 06:34:40 PM  
limeyfellow: ...I been quite happy with my dlink dir 655. About the only thing it hasn't been able to handle is NAT loopback requests which is rather sad, since i run an ftp server and can't use the external ip address when connecting in the LAN network...

I do the exact same thing with my DIR-655 but I can connect to the FTP server via internal or external IP as well as by hostname with no problem.

Are you running the 2.06NA firmware?
 
2013-01-25 06:59:18 PM  

SineSwiper:
DD-WRT is buggy, hasn't been developed in years, and their support team is full of dicks.

Ah, I see you've been told by Sash to update to latest version, and use the search. I can see where his attitude comes from most of the time, but I read so many lengthy help-me posts detailing environment, steps done, actual results with screenshots, and expected results/goals (often for stuff not on the bleeding edge of that software, like IP tables), and then see his 8 word canned response, it's hard not to be annoyed by the guy. Luckily, most of the rest of the (user) community is pretty decent.
 
2013-01-25 08:31:49 PM  

SineSwiper: RexTalionis: Considering that Cisco made a reputation for themselves as a networking and infrastructure company, they really managed to kill what good was left in Linksys when they bought it. Just like they did with Flip Video.

TheAlmightyOS: thinking about getting an ASUS myself. Know if they work well with dd-wrt firmware?

I have the Asus RT-N66R. Yes, it should work with DD-WRT.

DD-WRT is buggy, hasn't been developed in years, and their support team is full of dicks.

If you're going to flash your router, use OpenWRT. The last feature I asked for was in the development branch within 2 days.


I haven't played with OpenWRT, but I thought I'd throw my 2 cents in with Tomato. I put Shibby's build on my Netgear WNR3500L instead of DD-WRT and it worked exceptionally well. The Netghear is now just an access point (my router is a pfsense Atom box), but the features were nearly comperable. The one thing the build for my router was missing was an IPSEC VPN server.

/Use OpenVPN now, anyway, because iOS now supports it.
 
2013-01-25 09:04:16 PM  

Nexzus: SineSwiper:
DD-WRT is buggy, hasn't been developed in years, and their support team is full of dicks.

Ah, I see you've been told by Sash to update to latest version, and use the search. I can see where his attitude comes from most of the time, but I read so many lengthy help-me posts detailing environment, steps done, actual results with screenshots, and expected results/goals (often for stuff not on the bleeding edge of that software, like IP tables), and then see his 8 word canned response, it's hard not to be annoyed by the guy. Luckily, most of the rest of the (user) community is pretty decent.


Sash? No. Murrkf, yes. Most of them seem to be farktards and hostile trolls. They don't support the software or users, just act like dicks when you're missing one (usually non-critical to the problem) piece of information.

My last communication with them was downright hilarious with how unhelpful they wanted were. Like I said in my final post:

However, this is really a moot point as I see the warning signs already: this project is almost dead. The website is broken and fractured. The blog doesn't exist. The development news goes to a different site design that hasn't been updated in over a year. Looking at the bug tracker, 99% of the bugs in the last 4 years are marked as new, meaning nobody has even looked at them. (You can even see the history of the tickets going from properly maintained to the weight of the issues slowly crushing the project.)

Probably most damning of all is the fractured builds between BrainSlayer and eko. Both of which are in an "/other/" directory. It reminds me of the Alan Cox builds of the Linux kernel, but that was all cleaned up inside of a month and development was back to normal Linus ownership again. This is more permanent, like the owner of the project has left long ago and nobody really knows who's manning the project any more.

It's a damn shame, but I would suggest that the development efforts abandon the project and move on to one of the other more stable projects, like OpenWRT. Since it's GPL, pieces of this code should be merged with that project or something else.

Perhaps an obituary should be put on the forum as a sticky instead of all of these pointless FAQs...
 
2013-01-25 09:16:59 PM  
Not to threadjack, but is there a firmware that lets you restrict the amount of bandwith available to an individual client? Does OpenWRT allow that?

Running DD-WRT on my cheap Linksys wifi router w/no real issues, except access restrictions don't appear to work. I probay have the buggy firmware version. *sigh*
 
2013-01-25 10:12:24 PM  

vinniethepoo: Not to threadjack, but is there a firmware that lets you restrict the amount of bandwith available to an individual client? Does OpenWRT allow that?

Running DD-WRT on my cheap Linksys wifi router w/no real issues, except access restrictions don't appear to work. I probay have the buggy firmware version. *sigh*


I told a lie: it's a D-Link. Low-end consumer model, but supported by DD-WRT.
 
2013-01-25 10:46:45 PM  
Well shiat.

/hugs E3000
 
2013-01-25 10:56:24 PM  

vinniethepoo: Not to threadjack, but is there a firmware that lets you restrict the amount of bandwith available to an individual client? Does OpenWRT allow that?

Running DD-WRT on my cheap Linksys wifi router w/no real issues, except access restrictions don't appear to work. I probay have the buggy firmware version. *sigh*


My TP-Link (pictured above) has that built-in... it's a bandwidth control option, where I can select the IP and restrict the amount of bandwidth both incoming and outgoing.
 
2013-01-25 10:59:53 PM  

SineSwiper: This is more permanent, like the owner of the project has left long ago and nobody really knows who's manning the project any more.


Yeah, I installed TomatoUSB on my WRT54G about a year ago while troubleshooting some new client adapters.  It seemed that the lights were on at DD-WRT, but nobody was home.  TomatoUSB seems to have a bit of active development going on these days.


the opposite of charity is justice: ASUS RT-N16 router


I've actually been looking at the N16 since none of my mobiles can handle the 5GHz band, but a number of reviews from people who had them for about a year suggest that they frequently turn into paperweights once they go past their warranty.  Most end up recommending Linksys or Netgear instead.  Curious if there is any validity to their statements.  OTOH, I haven't heard of many late model routers that have matched the longevity of the trusty WRT54G.
 
2013-01-25 11:39:35 PM  

Dinjiin: I've actually been looking at the N16 since none of my mobiles can handle the 5GHz band, but a number of reviews from people who had them for about a year suggest that they frequently turn into paperweights once they go past their warranty.  Most end up recommending Linksys or Netgear instead.  Curious if there is any validity to their statements.


Can only speak from personal experience, my RT-N16 was purchased in Dec 2009 and has been working under a very heavy load ever since (torrents, mail/web/ftp servers while gaming online) with no problems. DD-WRT'd the day of receipt.

TheAlmightyOS: check the forums. While the website has not been updated the actual firmware has. It is very deceiving. I don't know why but it seems the forum and the website are controlled by two different entities with those controlling the website being lazy as fark.

Oh wow, I'd not noticed the startling disparity between the website and the forum info, thanks for the pointer!
 
2013-01-26 12:05:57 AM  

serial_crusher: I've been trying to think of fun things I can do to my neighbor who's running a Linksys router with all the default configs.  Would changing the SSID to "Belkin" be too subtle?


Apparently Linksys routers have internal DNS routing tables?

Reroute their entire internet to Tubgirl.
 
2013-01-26 12:34:08 AM  

F1_Fan: I'm taking the leap to Sonicwall


Never heard of them before, so I just went and looked at some reviews of their Sonicpoint APs.  Kinda mixed.  A lot of people were griping about issues with dotN frame aggregation and wide-channel mode.  One reviewer mentioned Ubiquiti, which I peeked at.  Less than half the price for an AP, doesn't look like a battle cruiser from Star Trek and glowing reviews. Never considered getting a ceiling puc AP, but if other reviews are just as rosy, I might just keep my WRT54G as my L3 router/nat box and just upgrade the AP instead.
 
2013-01-26 07:20:19 AM  
Whaddya know - a router buyers guide
 
2013-01-26 08:00:30 AM  

Ed Grubermann:

Buffalo also makes good units.


I've got an older Buffalo AirStation, and it's fine for everything, except the WiFi on my Android phone. It will keep the signal, but it drops connectivity for some reason. Because it works (mostly) fine for every other wireless unit we have in the house, I just live with it, and just cycle the WiFi signal on the phone if it happens.

For the main home computer, we lose connectivity every once in awhile, so I just find I have to power cycle the DSL modem and router about once every two months.

nucal Whaddya know - a router buyers guide

That was my reaction. This comment is also not a bookmark. It's threads like this that keep me coming back to Fark.
 
2013-01-26 02:01:48 PM  
This is an out and out, in your face, blatant, bookmark

/cuz that's just how I roll

//Asus RT-N16 running Tomato for 2.5 years.
 
2013-01-27 10:39:15 AM  

Dinjiin: F1_Fan: I'm taking the leap to Sonicwall

Never heard of them before, so I just went and looked at some reviews of their Sonicpoint APs.  Kinda mixed.  A lot of people were griping about issues with dotN frame aggregation and wide-channel mode.  One reviewer mentioned Ubiquiti, which I peeked at.  Less than half the price for an AP, doesn't look like a battle cruiser from Star Trek and glowing reviews. Never considered getting a ceiling puc AP, but if other reviews are just as rosy, I might just keep my WRT54G as my L3 router/nat box and just upgrade the AP instead.


At work I put in a sonicwall for firewall functions and then paired it with Aruba aps. They are a bit of a pain to setup the first one, but once done they work like a charm and will program once another.
 
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  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

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