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(BBC)   "Bacterial apocalypse coming" And I looked and behold, a white cell. The name that said on it was "gonorrhoea" and Hell followed with it   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 35
    More: Scary, gonorrhea, drug-resistant, University of Aberdeen, sex tourism, antibiotics, global warming, Hell Followed  
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2583 clicks; posted to Geek » on 25 Jan 2013 at 10:14 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-25 07:45:05 AM  
FTFA: "The rise in drug resistant infections is comparable to the threat of global warming, according to the chief medical officer for England."

So I guess that means the Conservatives will pretend Super Gonorrhea is a myth until it is a world-wide epidemic...
 
2013-01-25 07:52:00 AM  

MmmmBacon: FTFA: "The rise in drug resistant infections is comparable to the threat of global warming, according to the chief medical officer for England."

So I guess that means the Conservatives will pretend Super Gonorrhea is a myth until it is a world-wide epidemic...


"I DID NOT have sex with that bacterial infection!"

/yes yes, I know it's a Clinton quote
 
2013-01-25 10:00:02 AM  
So.. I'm curious how this'll affect the anti-vaxxers. They don't get shots. Kids gets whooping cough, antibiotics don't work...

Interesting.
 
2013-01-25 10:20:34 AM  

Earpj: So.. I'm curious how this'll affect the anti-vaxxers. They don't get shots. Kids gets whooping cough, antibiotics don't work...

Interesting.


Well most vaccines are for viral diseases, where antibiotics wouldn't work anyway. There probably are some exceptions though.
 
2013-01-25 10:22:04 AM  
Don't worry, the invisible hand of the market will take care of it.
 
2013-01-25 10:36:14 AM  

MmmmBacon: FTFA: "The rise in drug resistant infections is comparable to the threat of global warming, according to the chief medical officer for England."

So I guess that means the Conservatives will pretend Super Gonorrhea is a myth until it is a world-wide epidemic...


For farks sake the Weeners in has to be about politics?
 
2013-01-25 10:36:50 AM  

keepitcherry: MmmmBacon: FTFA: "The rise in drug resistant infections is comparable to the threat of global warming, according to the chief medical officer for England."

So I guess that means the Conservatives will pretend Super Gonorrhea is a myth until it is a world-wide epidemic...

For farks sake the Weeners in has to be about politics?


LMAO my sentence was butchered.
 
2013-01-25 10:39:20 AM  
Pochas:
Well most vaccines are for viral diseases, where antibiotics wouldn't work anyway. There probably are some exceptions though.

Yeah. I checked whooping cough, b/c of the epidemic. It says the treatment is antibiotics. Could be different treatments, I suppose. I only checked one.
 
2013-01-25 10:48:56 AM  
Great healine Subby
 
2013-01-25 10:49:51 AM  
So the only people left will be the bacterial resistant superpeople? I can dig it.
 
2013-01-25 10:50:53 AM  
Not to worry. I have been assured that evolution is false, and therefore bacteria cannot possibly evolve to become antibiotic resistant.
 
2013-01-25 10:57:10 AM  

keepitcherry: MmmmBacon: FTFA: "The rise in drug resistant infections is comparable to the threat of global warming, according to the chief medical officer for England."

So I guess that means the Conservatives will pretend Super Gonorrhea is a myth until it is a world-wide epidemic...

For farks sake the Weeners in has to be about politics?


THIS. Fark off to the politics tab asshat.
 
2013-01-25 10:59:24 AM  
Virgins, shut-ins rejoice. At least you dodged the gonorrhoea crisis.
 
2013-01-25 11:11:37 AM  
I found this article difficult to clap to.
 
2013-01-25 11:33:49 AM  
Some microbiologist Farker, reassure me, please. The article says there's been no development on new antibiotics because there's no money in it. Is that something that's going to change when Super Clap starts killing people?
 
2013-01-25 11:50:32 AM  
beheld*
 
2013-01-25 11:52:16 AM  
When the man comes. Around.
 
2013-01-25 12:04:19 PM  

Mad_Radhu: When the man comes. Around.


my god, there are other people that like that song too? ^_^

Rossi_84: Great healine Subby


Thank you kindly sir/madam ^_^
 
2013-01-25 12:08:31 PM  

Pochas: Earpj: So.. I'm curious how this'll affect the anti-vaxxers. They don't get shots. Kids gets whooping cough, antibiotics don't work...

Interesting.

Well most vaccines are for viral diseases, where antibiotics wouldn't work anyway. There probably are some exceptions though.


cholera and typhoid
 
2013-01-25 12:19:32 PM  
Prof Davies said: "It is clear that we might not ever see global warming, the apocalyptic scenario is that when I need a new hip in 20 years I'll die from a routine infection because we've run out of antibiotics."

That's not the apocalypse, that is your death. There is a difference, you self-centered twat.
 
2013-01-25 12:21:40 PM  
The earth has decided human population growth has dodged the natural order for far too long, and is starting to find creative ways to correct the situation.

/Goes off to play a quick round of Plague, Inc.
 
2013-01-25 12:34:50 PM  

BigLuca: Prof Davies said: "It is clear that we might not ever see global warming, the apocalyptic scenario is that when I need a new hip in 20 years I'll die from a routine infection because we've run out of antibiotics."

That's not the apocalypse, that is your death. There is a difference, you self-centered twat.


While I agree that the phrase was poorly worded, I think the message was that there it is very unlikely we will have a climate change apocalypse in our lifetimes, however, the end of effective antibiotics is extremely likely to happen in our lifetimes. Which is clearly terrifying, assuming it is true.
 
2013-01-25 12:43:42 PM  

Bloody Templar: Some microbiologist Farker, reassure me, please. The article says there's been no development on new antibiotics because there's no money in it. Is that something that's going to change when Super Clap starts killing people?


Take the number of super clap infections A, multiply by the number of pills taken by each case B, multiply by the cost of each pill C.
A * B * C = X. If X is less than the cost to develop a new drug, we don't make one.
 
2013-01-25 12:48:29 PM  

Bloody Templar: Some microbiologist Farker, reassure me, please. The article says there's been no development on new antibiotics because there's no money in it. Is that something that's going to change when Super Clap starts killing people?


Yes and no. Developing new antibiotics is incredibly difficult, and regulations don't exactly help. The major issue, as I understand it, is that in the current environment, there is a high reluctance to use new antibiotics except for the most stubborn infections or the most vulnerable patients. Strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are popping up frequently, and the only recourse in those circumstances are the newest antibiotics that aren't commonly used, and thus unlikely to be resisted by the bacteria. Because these drugs are the best chance at clearing those ugly infections, they're otherwise generally unused to prevent resistance from spreading.

Makes sense, right? Except if you're the drug company, you're probably not excited about spending a decade on R&D and clinical trials, only to have your antibiotic sit in storage except for a handful of cases. It's a sticky situation we've worked ourselves into.
 
2013-01-25 01:12:41 PM  
Tuberculosis is airborne and we already have strains of it that don't respond to any antibiotic.

the earliest recorded cases of TDR were not the current 12 known cases in Mumbai or the 15 cases in Iran in 2009, but rather two women from Italy who died in 2003 after being sick for several years.

Both women were middle-aged at most (the journal says only "younger than 50″), born in Italy, from middle class families, and otherwise healthy, with no diseases that would put them at greater risk of TB infection. (Among other things, that means no HIV.) They were both treated at the E. Morelli Hospital, a giant TB sanatorium in the town of Sondalo, north of Milan near the Swiss border. They were both diagnosed by local doctors and treated with repeated rounds of the normal TB drugs - three rounds each - before someone recognized that something unusual was happening. They were separately admitted to the Morelli hospital with what the paper calls "a very severe clinical picture (extended bilateral cavities)," which means the TB infection had eaten away the tissue of their lungs, leaving empty dead zones. (If you'd like to see what that looks like, here are some pathology images, not from these women.)

The first woman actually caught multi-drug resistant TB from her mother and gave it to her 14-year-old daughter (who is not the second case in the paper - more on her below). She was treated in three different hospitals, with 17 different antibiotics, for 422 days, or 14 months - and took TB drugs for 94 months before her untreatable disease killed her.

The second woman - whether she was related to the first, or lived near her, is not made clear - was in one other hospital before being admitted to the TB specialty institution in Sondalo. Her inpatient treatment took 625 days and also involved 17 different drugs. After she was discharged, she was on a drug regimen for 60 months before untreatable TB killed her also.


Airborne diseases that cannot be cured with antibiotics are not just theoretical. This particular one is already here.
 
2013-01-25 01:18:10 PM  
25.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-01-25 03:23:32 PM  

Bloody Templar: Some microbiologist Farker, reassure me, please. The article says there's been no development on new antibiotics because there's no money in it. Is that something that's going to change when Super Clap starts killing people?


Ah capitalism at its finest.
 
2013-01-25 03:59:51 PM  
I'm curious if we Americans are more or less susceptible to these new viruses, as say compared to a 2nd world country like India.
 
2013-01-25 04:56:31 PM  

somedude210: my god, there are other people that like that song too? ^_^


CSB, my only problem with the lyrics in that song is the line "The Father Hen will call his chickens home." There is no gorram Father Hen, that would be a Father Rooster.
 
2013-01-25 05:26:14 PM  
FTFA:

Prof Davies said: "It is clear that we might not ever see global warming, the apocalyptic scenario is that when I need a new hip in 20 years I'll die from a routine infection because we've run out of antibiotics."

If you've lived long enough to wear out your hip you've lived too long.

Think of how much "Western" longevity furthers global warming, especially all the resources we need for nurse's aides to drive over to bathe you while you sit in your electric wheelchair, with your nose tubed up to an oxygen tank, eating Domino's pizza, with the heat on 85. Not to mention all the operations you've had to replace your knees, fix your heart and perhaps your prostate, remove your gallbladder, and so on. Why should we use up all those resources just so you can suffer a few more years?

I'm going to try to survive as long as my dog does. !'m almost 50 already, and he's a 12# pound 7.5 year old mutt who's he's got at most another 10 years; I'm certainly not going to make him suffer long enough for him to get used to misery and pain. The only reason I'm sticking around that long is because's the one living creature who I'm sure loves me, perhaps the only one who ever really did: it's bad enough that the ex insists on having custody so I have to keep deserting him 3 or 4 times a week. (A few years ago I was gone for 3 weeks: he waited by the door for 2 weeks, then he went under the sofa to mope & mourn.) After that I might as well take up snorting crank, smoking cigars and boozing all day, after I have DNR tattooed across my chest and forehead.
 
2013-01-25 07:01:34 PM  

HellRaisingHoosier: I'm curious if we Americans are more or less susceptible to these new viruses, as say compared to a 2nd world country like India.


Bacteria, dumbass. The article's about ANTIBIOTIC-resistent BACTERIA. It's people like you who ruin antibiotics for the rest of us, takin' them for cold and flu...punk.
 
2013-01-25 11:51:26 PM  

Nurglitch: Don't worry, the invisible hand of the market will take care of it.


Ummmmm..... except it isn't a free market. Things like prostitution being illegal, legal harassment, even killing, of gays in some countries, stuff like that. Good "obviously visible hand of The State" stuff. These things, of course, make the practitioners, customers, and gay partners do everything in secret as much as possible, and NOT be trackable by health authorities... thereby increasing the incidence of untreated/UNDER-treated diseases that then mutate and develop resistances.

So, yeah, find another whipping boy.
 
2013-01-25 11:55:16 PM  

hstein3: Bloody Templar: Some microbiologist Farker, reassure me, please. The article says there's been no development on new antibiotics because there's no money in it. Is that something that's going to change when Super Clap starts killing people?

Yes and no. Developing new antibiotics is incredibly difficult, and regulations don't exactly help. The major issue, as I understand it, is that in the current environment, there is a high reluctance to use new antibiotics except for the most stubborn infections or the most vulnerable patients. Strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are popping up frequently, and the only recourse in those circumstances are the newest antibiotics that aren't commonly used, and thus unlikely to be resisted by the bacteria. Because these drugs are the best chance at clearing those ugly infections, they're otherwise generally unused to prevent resistance from spreading.

Makes sense, right? Except if you're the drug company, you're probably not excited about spending a decade on R&D and clinical trials, only to have your antibiotic sit in storage except for a handful of cases. It's a sticky situation we've worked ourselves into.


Again, not the "invisible hand of the market" but the "visible hand of The State" is actually to blame.

But it's more fun and intellectually lazy to blame ZOMFG Kapitalism.
 
2013-01-26 04:14:37 PM  

Pochas: Earpj: So.. I'm curious how this'll affect the anti-vaxxers. They don't get shots. Kids gets whooping cough, antibiotics don't work...

Interesting.

Well most vaccines are for viral diseases, where antibiotics wouldn't work anyway. There probably are some exceptions though.


Pertussis, diphtheria, tetanus, TB, cholera, Hemophilus influenzae, pneumonia...a fair amount of common vaccines are anti-bacterial. Although, in many cases the vaccine is against the toxin produced by the bacteria rather than the bacteria itself.
 
2013-01-27 01:04:24 AM  
suptg.thisisnotatrueending.com
 
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