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(Orlando Sentinel)   You too can own a $2.1 million home in Florida for free. Just live in it for seven years on squatter rights and it's yours   (orlandosentinel.com) divider line 71
    More: Florida, squatters, marine transfer operations, Broward counties  
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20619 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Jan 2013 at 12:57 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
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Archived thread
2013-01-24 01:01:59 PM  
4 votes:
Enjoy paying the property taxes.
2013-01-24 01:01:37 PM  
4 votes:
Problem: Squatters.
Solution: Don't fail to step foot in your house even once in 7 years.
2013-01-24 12:59:40 PM  
3 votes:
I would never spend 2 years in FL.
2013-01-24 02:48:09 PM  
2 votes:
www.topofarmer.com

If you can't bother to be in a house for 7 years, you probably don't need it. It would solve the "housing crisis" or drive the banks poor trying to keep up the property.
2013-01-24 02:40:52 PM  
2 votes:
In UK, adverse posession (or at least the UK equivalent) is rampant ... at least if the daily mail is to believed. the squatters always describe themselves as "italian." and yet, their "italian" always sounds a lot like albanian or romanian...
2013-01-24 02:15:29 PM  
2 votes:

sxacho: We hired a lawyer and stopped paying our mortgage to BOA about 6 months ago. We figure we've got at least another few years before they kick us out. Instead of renting after this, I think it might be worth looking further into this. It's not like there's a shortage of abandoned homes around here.


After the eviction I think you should try and take back YOUR house via adverse possession. That would be epic.
2013-01-24 02:08:35 PM  
2 votes:
Man it just reeks of sandy vaginas in here. I mean why do you people even give two shiats? BOA are goons and Floridians are dumb asses I say good on him.
2013-01-24 01:58:27 PM  
2 votes:
i know that neighborhood...they are probably more upset that someone is 'stealing' a house and they didn't think of it first. they probably have stolen more money than a thousand of burglars in the county.

i live in boca...or technically palm beach county (west boca).
2013-01-24 01:55:57 PM  
2 votes:
FWIW, much of the actual application of adverse possession deals with boundary questios and disputes.

Say you've got an established fence line with your neighbor. It's been "yours" for as long as anyone remembers, since you bought, since they bought. You've taken care of it, improved it, started a garden on it, maybe built a shed.

Now a new guy buys the property next door. He claims that the fence is in the wrong spot and he really owns 10 feet of "your" property.

How do you settle it? Maybe lots of surveys, looking for geographical markers, digging through old records, etc. Those may reveal conflicting info, especially old surveys.

But adverse possession settles it pretty easily. If you've been treating it like it's yours, it's yours.
2013-01-24 01:47:04 PM  
2 votes:
Adverse possession is a bit more complex than that.  Generally you have to live somewhere "openly and notoriously", Treat the property as if you own it (such as by paying taxes and doing upkeep on it), have a "claim of right" (ie some reason, even if mistaken, to believe it belongs to you), and do so continously for somewhere between 10 and 20 years.   Now that said, I fully expect to see a whole damn lot of AP cases come out of this foreclosure mess.  Have a friend who jumped through every hoop BOA asked her to try to get a mortgage modification, but because of paperwork snafus BOA first scheduled the house for sale before they'd actually legally foreclosed on it,  and then foreclosed, but never evicted her (she left on her own ) and the house is now sitting empty, and she's still getting the property tax and utility assessments for it, two years later.   She's very tempted to simply move back in and see what happens.  I suspect nothing will for many many years by which time she might well have an AP claim
2013-01-24 01:46:37 PM  
2 votes:

EVERYBODY PANIC: Correction: Bank of America does not own the property, and cannot set foot on the AP property until awarded the property at the end of the foreclosure process. The abandoned home is still in the name of the original purchaser, and only the original purchaser can have anybody evicted.


Wrong. I mean like, really, really wrong.BOA has been awarded ownership and are on the deed as the owners.
2013-01-24 01:34:30 PM  
2 votes:

gshepnyc: pute kisses like a man: wow. 7 years for adverse possession in florida? that's a little crazy.

it's 10 or 30 years in louisiana (good faith with just title in 10 years, 30 years w/o title or in bad faith) (we also call it acquisitive prescription. an elegant term for a more civilized age).

I think 30 years is too long. Why should useful property be off-limits for a generation? Why should anyone who can go anywhere near that long without exercising any meaningful use of property just keep it?

Seems like the real squatter in cases like this is the owner who purporta to own land he doesn't use and doesn't set foot on for years on end.


Whose opinion is it that the land isn't being used in a useful fashion? I could own 500 acres of prime vacant wooded land. Maybe I enjoy preserving wildlife. Maybe I hunt on it once a year. Maybe I plan on subdividing it in 20 years to pay for my retirement when house prices go up again (in theory.)

These things aren't for you to decide, it's for the owner of the land to decide.
2013-01-24 01:33:03 PM  
2 votes:

EVERYBODY PANIC: groppet: So while he is squatting does he have to pay the property taxes? And if he leaves can they just board up the place to prevent him from getting back in?

In Florida, an adverse possessor must file a particular form with the county, occupy the dwelling, pay all taxes and HOA dues where applicable, and make visible improvements over the course of 7 years. If the form is filled out correctly and filed, it is not considered by law to be squatting.


How do you gain access without "breaking in" and what makes a property abandoned and thus eligible for filing the paperwork?
2013-01-24 01:27:13 PM  
2 votes:

quizzical: It is trespassing. But, per TFA, Bank of America hasn't gotten around to kicking the squatter off their land yet.


This. Adverse possession doesn't work the way this article (and most people) make it out to be. If a rep from Bank of America were to go to the house, bust down the door and tell the guy to get lost, it ends that easily. The guy is trespassing and doesn't own the home. He can declare anything he wants, but as long as that 7 years hasn't passed, he's got nothing.

I wonder if BoA can use this to their advantage? Maybe let the guy pay taxes and upkeep on it until they managed to sell it at auction. Then I'd kick the guy out, close the deal and save a few bucks that way.

NutWrench: I wonder if they can actually prove ownership. It seems pretty strange that they haven't evicted this guy, yet.


Now THAT might be the real issue. With all the shuffling and repackaging of mortgages, maybe they can't.
2013-01-24 01:11:14 PM  
2 votes:

Sugarmoobs: If the guy maintains the property and taxes and such (not likely), why should the neighbors care? Its not their business as long as the property in question does not go in to disrepair and brings down their own home values. They should be blaming Bank of America, not this schmo.


Let me guess: You've never owned a house before.

A jobless 23 year old can't even begin to properly maintain a $50,000 house, let alone a $2 million one.
2013-01-24 01:10:26 PM  
2 votes:
The neighbor should just go squat there also. Are the laws to handle multiple squatters? If two people squat, and one goes out to the store, does their 7 year timer reset?
2013-01-24 01:10:23 PM  
2 votes:
He not breaking any laws. Funny how the rich get all pissy when people use laws to get away with things.
2013-01-24 11:43:47 PM  
1 votes:

Bucky Katt: Nice try but BoA's army of lawyers will take care of it real quick.


Just as soon as they find the right document signed by the right Linda Green

i.imgur.com
2013-01-24 04:57:12 PM  
1 votes:

WeenerGord: jst3p: WeenerGord: The letter of the law, and the spirit of the law, are not the same. Perhaps you are merely hiding your shame behind semantics.

The spirit of the law is to encourage and reward productive use of land which is a benefit to society.


I bet it was also "perfectly legal" when the bank stole it from the last owners, too. Did that also encourage and reward productive use of land which is a benefit to society?


The bank did not steal the house from the homeowners. The homeowners and the bank entered into a contract. The homeowners breached the contract and foreclosure was the legal result. One of the primary functions of government is to enforce contracts. Consistent and fair resolution of contract disputes is a benefit to society.
2013-01-24 04:47:31 PM  
1 votes:

WeenerGord: The letter of the law, and the spirit of the law, are not the same. Perhaps you are merely hiding your shame behind semantics.


The spirit of the law is to encourage and reward productive use of land which is a benefit to society.
2013-01-24 02:30:55 PM  
1 votes:

WeenerGord: jst3p: I wouldn't do it in million dollar homes, I would imagine that the property taxes on a reasonable place is less than a working poor family pays in rent. On my 210k rental property the property taxes are $1,300 a year. I just think it would be a fun and unique way of helping people.

Why don't you give away your rental property, then? or let them live there for free?


Because I do not yet have an investment income that sustains me, a requirement I laid out for my cunning plan.


Why are you busting my chops for entertaining the thought?
2013-01-24 02:29:02 PM  
1 votes:

gshepnyc: Don't be absurd. If you own more land than you need for yourself and your family to live, you are a burden on society that has to deal with people who don't have a home or who don't have enough. You can't justify being a glutton, sorry.



I bet that's just what the settlers told the Indians
2013-01-24 02:18:56 PM  
1 votes:

jst3p: EVERYBODY PANIC: jst3p: EVERYBODY PANIC: groppet: So while he is squatting does he have to pay the property taxes? And if he leaves can they just board up the place to prevent him from getting back in?

In Florida, an adverse possessor must file a particular form with the county, occupy the dwelling, pay all taxes and HOA dues where applicable, and make visible improvements over the course of 7 years. If the form is filled out correctly and filed, it is not considered by law to be squatting.

How do you gain access without "breaking in" and what makes a property abandoned and thus eligible for filing the paperwork?

As an adverse possessor, you go to the county, file the form, and then you are legally required to maintain and 'improve' the property, which includes changing the locks. VTW: The form is called DR452:  [img14.imageshack.us image 784x350]

So let me get this straight. If I see a house in Florida that no one shows up to every night and there is no furniture in I can fill out that form and then call a locksmith to let me in and change the locks? Can I then use that address to file for food stamps and other public assistance?


The house doesn't need to be devoid of furniture. It can be fully furnished.
Link
2013-01-24 02:17:03 PM  
1 votes:

EVERYBODY PANIC: As an adverse possessor, you go to the county, file the form, and then you are legally required to maintain and 'improve' the property, which includes changing the locks. VTW: The form is called DR452:


So many people hate bureaucracy, but little do they know what you can do with it and a little knowledge.  There is literally nothing you can't do if you're clever enough and know where to look
2013-01-24 02:09:45 PM  
1 votes:

jst3p: cefm: To all the folks who are saying that adverse possession is a relic that should be eliminated - this is not an example of why adverse possession is BAD, it's an example of why adverse possession is GOOD.

The evil that we want to avoid is un-used property that someone "owns" on paper but that they express no interest in. That's the kind of thing that blights neighborhoods and prevents useful development. If you don't act like you own something then you might as well not own it.

Part of the problem we've been seeing with these mega-banks owning too many mortgages is that they can't deal with the actual issues involved in ownership. Banks holding forclosed properties need to pay their taxes, maintain the property, defend it against adverse possession, and find a new owner or a renter. This is WORK and it costs money and time. This is supposed to be the penalty that banks pay for giving bad loans and is a disincentive to foreclosure/repossession. Many local banks would try to find a way to avoid it with the owner, but BoA is too big and lazy to try. So they foreclose and then ignore the vacant property. They deserve this consequence.

I am dubious that this guy will make it the full 7 years. But he's living rent-free in a mansion for now, and more people should do the same to force BoA to clean up its practices relating to foreclosure, renegotiating loans and selling foreclosed properties.

THIS makes a lot of sense to me. I would be curious if anyone could rebut in an intelligent manner.


why is this only happening in Florida? we should be doing this in every state

i got dibbs on all the CA houses
2013-01-24 02:06:04 PM  
1 votes:

quizzical: Rich Cream: thurstonxhowell: Problem: Squatters.
Solution: Don't fail to step foot in your house even once in 7 years.

He's 23 years old. I think he plans on staying there seven years.

/trespassing, I don't understand how it's not that. One entity can show papers of ownership (supposedly), the other can't.

It is trespassing. But, per TFA, Bank of America hasn't gotten around to kicking the squatter off their land yet.


Correct... it can't be trespassing until the owner of the property tells the trespasser that they can no longer be on property and the trespasser refuses to leave.
2013-01-24 01:58:26 PM  
1 votes:

ArcadianRefugee: rufus-t-firefly: Fark her. Maybe she should just worry about her own business and stop sticking her nose where it doesn't belong.

Concern that a 23-yo who calls himself "Loki Boy" might bring down her property value seems, to me, to be "her own business".


So might a black or Hispanic family moving into the neighborhood. Should she try to keep that from happening?
2013-01-24 01:56:47 PM  
1 votes:

rufus-t-firefly: Fark her. Maybe she should just worry about her own business and stop sticking her nose where it doesn't belong.


Concern that a 23-yo who calls himself "Loki Boy" might bring down her property value seems, to me, to be "her own business".
2013-01-24 01:51:56 PM  
1 votes:

deanis: HotWingConspiracy: It's just aggravating, she said, considering how hard she worked to be able to afford a house in the neighborhood.

I support him just to spite this snooty coont. I might send him a pizza.

How is she being snooty? saying that you worked hard to earn something? tough farking crowd around here.


To start with, she was suspicious of this "Brazilian national" living in this house, assuming he didn't belong there.

Then, she's pissed that BoA won't talk to her about buying the house so she can throw the guy out.

Fark her. Maybe she should just worry about her own business and stop sticking her nose where it doesn't belong.
2013-01-24 01:51:21 PM  
1 votes:

pag1107: Eventually the unwieldy, behemoth BofA will figure out he's in there and have him removed


It could be that they know he is there and don't care yet because he is what keeps the pipes from being ripped from the walls. I wonder if they can wait until the 11th hour then act to convict him, when they are ready to deal with the property.
2013-01-24 01:47:56 PM  
1 votes:
"This is a very upsetting thing," said next door neighbor Lyn Houston. "Last week, I went to the Bank of America and asked to see the person in charge of mortgages. I told them, 'I am prepared to buy this house.' They haven't even called me back."

I wonder what first aroused suspicion that this guy didn't belong there?

a Brazilian national

Ah. Guess he doesn't look like he's supposed to.

Guess what? It's none of your farking business. It's THEIR property. They don't HAVE to sell it to you any more than they HAVE to evict this guy.

Houston said she noticed the lights came on at the home right around Christmas.She knocked on the door recently and heard people rustling about, but no one came to the door, she said. At night, the front door's carriage lights are on but nothing else can be seen.

Such a nosey biatch, isn't she?

It's just aggravating, she said, considering how hard she worked to be able to afford a house in the neighborhood.

Once again, the rich are jealous of how easy the poor have it. How about minding your own farking business and enjoying your life?

"We're all going crazy, trying to figure out what to do," she said. "It's unbelievable that it can be done. Plus, if they've got the balls to break in the house, what's to prevent them from coming over here?

Uh, just live in your farking house and you should be fine.

Even better - go fark yourself.
2013-01-24 01:47:43 PM  
1 votes:

lennavan: ArcadianRefugee: Why? They'd just sell it in turn, if they had any sense. Otherwise, "working poor" becomes "completely broke" when they have to start paying the taxes on the place.

Presumably a working poor family is currently paying rent somewhere. If he sold it to them for $1, their monthly payments might actually go down. I might recommend a different way of picking on jst3p:


Wasn't actually picking on him. And you can go ahead and sell the home for $1, but the land itself will still be assessed at whatever it's value is, which I imagine is a shiatload in that sort of neighborhood.

Lemme look.
2013-01-24 01:44:45 PM  
1 votes:
Aww, sounds like somebody in the 1% is mad because somebody in the 99% is living next door.  Excuse me while I fail to give a shiat.
2013-01-24 01:44:38 PM  
1 votes:

abhorrent1: jst3p: If I had sustainable investment income and no family I think it would be fun to attempt to gain title to homes in this fashion and if successful sell it to a "working poor" family for a fraction of its value and move on to the next one.

How to you suppose a "working poor" family is going to pay the annual taxes, upkeep and utility bills for a house that size?


Keep reading
2013-01-24 01:44:27 PM  
1 votes:

ArcadianRefugee: jst3p: EVERYBODY PANIC: liam76: Can he get the power/water tunred on?

If not is he allowed to live there?

Quick answer: Yes. I know several Adverse Possession folks. They do it within existing law. Some eventually win the house, some don't. File the appropriate paperwork with the county, move in, andhave the utilities turned on by using the form with which you AP's the house. Easy. Lawful. Every state has a different system, but it can be domne anywhere in the US or in any former British colony.

If I had sustainable investment income and no family I think it would be fun to attempt to gain title to homes in this fashion and if successful sell it to a "working poor" family for a fraction of its value and move on to the next one.

Why? They'd just sell it in turn, if they had any sense. Otherwise, "working poor" becomes "completely broke" when they have to start paying the taxes on the place.


You ask why? Here's just one answer: If nobody maintains a home in a good neighborhood, it falls apart, depressing the entire neighborhood's property values. Wait, here's a second reason: If good people don't take possession and maintainthe place, real hellions will move in and destroy the place. Summation: Society is best served if homes are kept in good repair, and Adverse Possession exists mostly for the many reasons it serves society so well.
2013-01-24 01:42:22 PM  
1 votes:

gshepnyc: topcon: gshepnyc: pute kisses like a man: wow. 7 years for adverse possession in florida? that's a little crazy.

it's 10 or 30 years in louisiana (good faith with just title in 10 years, 30 years w/o title or in bad faith) (we also call it acquisitive prescription. an elegant term for a more civilized age).

I think 30 years is too long. Why should useful property be off-limits for a generation? Why should anyone who can go anywhere near that long without exercising any meaningful use of property just keep it?

Seems like the real squatter in cases like this is the owner who purporta to own land he doesn't use and doesn't set foot on for years on end.

Whose opinion is it that the land isn't being used in a useful fashion? I could own 500 acres of prime vacant wooded land. Maybe I enjoy preserving wildlife. Maybe I hunt on it once a year. Maybe I plan on subdividing it in 20 years to pay for my retirement when house prices go up again (in theory.)

These things aren't for you to decide, it's for the owner of the land to decide.

It's a house. It's meant to be lived in by people. Don't be absurd. If you own more land than you need for yourself and your family to live, you are a burden on society that has to deal with people who don't have a home or who don't have enough. You can't justify being a glutton, sorry.


Oh, landowners are gluttons and a drag on society now?

That's some neat logic, Connor. See where that gets you in life.
2013-01-24 01:40:59 PM  
1 votes:

topcon: gshepnyc: pute kisses like a man: wow. 7 years for adverse possession in florida? that's a little crazy.

it's 10 or 30 years in louisiana (good faith with just title in 10 years, 30 years w/o title or in bad faith) (we also call it acquisitive prescription. an elegant term for a more civilized age).

I think 30 years is too long. Why should useful property be off-limits for a generation? Why should anyone who can go anywhere near that long without exercising any meaningful use of property just keep it?

Seems like the real squatter in cases like this is the owner who purporta to own land he doesn't use and doesn't set foot on for years on end.

Whose opinion is it that the land isn't being used in a useful fashion? I could own 500 acres of prime vacant wooded land. Maybe I enjoy preserving wildlife. Maybe I hunt on it once a year. Maybe I plan on subdividing it in 20 years to pay for my retirement when house prices go up again (in theory.)

These things aren't for you to decide, it's for the owner of the land to decide.


It's a house. It's meant to be lived in by people. Don't be absurd. If you own more land than you need for yourself and your family to live, you are a burden on society that has to deal with people who don't have a home or who don't have enough. You can't justify being a glutton, sorry.
2013-01-24 01:40:00 PM  
1 votes:
Someone should post up signs with the house address on it that says "COME STAY FOR FREE!".

Cue dozens of homeless people filling up every square foot of the house by the end of the day. Let's see how that asshole squatter likes those apples.
2013-01-24 01:36:19 PM  
1 votes:
I doubt this 23-year-old Brazilian can afford the upkeep or improvements on the house, much less the taxes. Now wonder the neighbors want him out of their hair.
2013-01-24 01:35:22 PM  
1 votes:

Sail The Wide Accountancy: Bank of America owns it right now. The problem seemed to be that Bank of America could bring up the matter in civil court but so far seems unwilling to do so. The only reason this is in the papers is because a rich neighbor is upset that she has to live next to a "riff raff".


Correction: Bank of America does not own the property, and cannot set foot on the AP property until awarded the property at the end of the foreclosure process. The abandoned home is still in the name of the original purchaser, and only the original purchaser can have anybody evicted.
2013-01-24 01:35:18 PM  
1 votes:
"Police were called the day after Christmas"

Fark, less than a month so far. Let me know when he sees 120 days.
2013-01-24 01:32:57 PM  
1 votes:
It's just aggravating, she said, considering how hard she worked to be able to afford a house in the neighborhood.

I support him just to spite this snooty coont. I might send him a pizza.
2013-01-24 01:31:43 PM  
1 votes:

ArcadianRefugee: jst3p: EVERYBODY PANIC: liam76: Can he get the power/water tunred on?

If not is he allowed to live there?

Quick answer: Yes. I know several Adverse Possession folks. They do it within existing law. Some eventually win the house, some don't. File the appropriate paperwork with the county, move in, andhave the utilities turned on by using the form with which you AP's the house. Easy. Lawful. Every state has a different system, but it can be domne anywhere in the US or in any former British colony.

If I had sustainable investment income and no family I think it would be fun to attempt to gain title to homes in this fashion and if successful sell it to a "working poor" family for a fraction of its value and move on to the next one.

Why? They'd just sell it in turn, if they had any sense. Otherwise, "working poor" becomes "completely broke" when they have to start paying the taxes on the place.


I wouldn't do it in million dollar homes, I would imagine that the property taxes on a reasonable place is less than a working poor family pays in rent. On my 210k rental property the property taxes are $1,300 a year. I just think it would be a fun and unique way of helping people.
2013-01-24 01:31:32 PM  
1 votes:
Rich folks upset that they have to live near the unwashed masses.

Nothing to see here.
2013-01-24 01:29:12 PM  
1 votes:
I'd just burn the house down.
2013-01-24 01:28:52 PM  
1 votes:

Rich Cream: thurstonxhowell: Problem: Squatters.
Solution: Don't fail to step foot in your house even once in 7 years.

He's 23 years old. I think he plans on staying there seven years.

/trespassing, I don't understand how it's not that. One entity can show papers of ownership (supposedly), the other can't.


An abandoned property can be gained via adverse possession in every state. Florida has a form you fill out and file with the county. Between the time of abandonment and the time a court awards the property back to the mortgage company, AP is lawful and winnable. Tell me, who owns the property? The answer is that it is in the name of the guy who ditched it, and not the bank. The "person of title" (former owner) can have the guy evicted, butr never bothers to do so. The bank has no rights to the property until the courts award the property to the bank, which takes a couple of years right now.
2013-01-24 01:28:42 PM  
1 votes:

pute kisses like a man: wow. 7 years for adverse possession in florida? that's a little crazy.

it's 10 or 30 years in louisiana (good faith with just title in 10 years, 30 years w/o title or in bad faith) (we also call it acquisitive prescription. an elegant term for a more civilized age).


I think 30 years is too long. Why should useful property be off-limits for a generation? Why should anyone who can go anywhere near that long without exercising any meaningful use of property just keep it?

Seems like the real squatter in cases like this is the owner who purporta to own land he doesn't use and doesn't set foot on for years on end.
2013-01-24 01:28:08 PM  
1 votes:

lennavan: ZAZ: In Massachusetts you can get a court order protecting your land from adverse possession. ("registered land")

In Connecticut the United States, they can kick you out of your home because they want to build a shopping mall and your home totes gets in their way.



FTFY
2013-01-24 01:26:23 PM  
1 votes:

EVERYBODY PANIC: liam76: Can he get the power/water tunred on?

If not is he allowed to live there?

Quick answer: Yes. I know several Adverse Possession folks. They do it within existing law. Some eventually win the house, some don't. File the appropriate paperwork with the county, move in, andhave the utilities turned on by using the form with which you AP's the house. Easy. Lawful. Every state has a different system, but it can be domne anywhere in the US or in any former British colony.


If I had sustainable investment income and no family I think it would be fun to attempt to gain title to homes in this fashion and if successful sell it to a "working poor" family for a fraction of its value and move on to the next one.
2013-01-24 01:26:00 PM  
1 votes:

pute kisses like a man: wow. 7 years for adverse possession in florida? that's a little crazy.

it's 10 or 30 years in louisiana (good faith with just title in 10 years, 30 years w/o title or in bad faith) (we also call it acquisitive prescription. an elegant term for a more civilized age).


It might be stated as 7 years, but in reality it's not. It can still go to court, and frequently people trying to claim adverse possession don't win. I've heard of cases of 70, 80 years, property passed down through generations, where someone finally wants to get title or land, re-subdivide land, claim fences, buildings, etc, who can't.
2013-01-24 01:20:41 PM  
1 votes:
If this goes anything like that guy who tried to squat in a (half million dollar house in Texas?) about a year ago, here's how the thread will go:

It'll get 600 replies.

About 10 people will ask "HOW CAN I DO THAT?"

Then, that's the last you'll hear of it, because this shiat never goes anywhere. I think they did an update on the guy in Texas, and, of course, he was eventually removed.
2013-01-24 01:16:48 PM  
1 votes:

Insatiable Jesus: Rich ratfarkers pissed that a brown person is ratfarking the system? LOL LOLOLLLLLLOL


A person getting in the way of properly getting this house into actual homeowners hands. What's better for this neighborhood, a squatter or a homeowner? What does skin color have to do with this?
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-01-24 01:15:05 PM  
1 votes:
Imagine a world without adverse possession.

In Massachusetts you can get a court order protecting your land from adverse possession. ("registered land")

No one saw him breaking into the 5-bedroom house, so it's a civil matter.

Florida must have criminal trespass laws. What the police mean is, they don't want to deal with it.
2013-01-24 01:14:19 PM  
1 votes:
And as someone with a related job to the industry, I've dealt with adverse possession before.

It's not just cut and dried that you own something after seven years, not even close. There's way more to it than that, and it never happens in this fashion. Judges frequently side with the original owner of something if even it's been on someone else's property for decades.
2013-01-24 01:13:15 PM  
1 votes:
The only problem with this "problem" is that no one involved cares. The police don't care, the bank that owns it don't care, the squatters don't care. So why should I?
2013-01-24 01:11:53 PM  
1 votes:
I should claim "adverse possession" of the office bathroom. Lord knows I've exercised squatter's rights on that thing for over seven years!
2013-01-24 01:11:34 PM  
1 votes:
What's the tax situation on something like that. Not only will there be property taxes on a $2.1 million home, but that house's value counts as income, too. He didn't have it before, now he does. He's going to have to come up with probably close to a million bucks to keep it. And I'm guessing that if he's squatting in it, it won't be able to be marketed or sold for anywhere close to the "value" mentioned. He might end up really screwing himself with the tax man...
2013-01-24 01:10:06 PM  
1 votes:
Getting something for nothing. The American Dream. USA USA USA
2013-01-24 01:10:06 PM  
1 votes:
How did he not gain entry by breaking and entering? It seems like he is committing multiple crimes here.
2013-01-24 01:08:48 PM  
1 votes:
So he's a Brazilian national with no job. Possibly a former student who didn't update his status when he dropped out of school. What's to keep them from yanking his Visa and sending him home? I'm sure BoA has enough local politicians on speed dial. Any one of them could send him packing.
2013-01-24 01:07:18 PM  
1 votes:
Bank of America owns it right now. The problem seemed to be that Bank of America could bring up the matter in civil court but so far seems unwilling to do so. The only reason this is in the papers is because a rich neighbor is upset that she has to live next to a "riff raff".
2013-01-24 01:07:03 PM  
1 votes:
It's FL, he isn't a us citizen. How hard could it be to make him get lost in a swamp, with heavy shoes.
2013-01-24 01:06:42 PM  
1 votes:
Until the Government sends him a tax bill and takes it away anyway.
2013-01-24 01:06:12 PM  
1 votes:

abhorrent1: Enjoy paying the property taxes.


If he's not listed as owner then why would he owe taxes? They send the bill to the bank.
2013-01-24 01:06:11 PM  
1 votes:
FTA: Bank of America didn't respond to the Sun Sentinel's inquiry. And neither did Barbosa, a Brazilian national who refers to himself as "Loki Boy," after the Norse god of mischief.

Too funny. Ah, Florida. Is there anything you can't do?
2013-01-24 01:04:44 PM  
1 votes:
HA HA YOUR IN FLORIDA NOW
2013-01-24 01:04:08 PM  
1 votes:
So while he is squatting does he have to pay the property taxes? And if he leaves can they just board up the place to prevent him from getting back in?
2013-01-24 01:03:46 PM  
1 votes:
i'm assuming he has no money. How does he pay for electricity, water, internet? porn?
2013-01-24 01:03:33 PM  
1 votes:

thurstonxhowell: Problem: Squatters.
Solution: Don't fail to step foot in your house even once in 7 years.


He's 23 years old. I think he plans on staying there seven years.

/trespassing, I don't understand how it's not that. One entity can show papers of ownership (supposedly), the other can't.
2013-01-24 01:03:13 PM  
1 votes:
What are the property taxes going to be on that?
2013-01-24 01:01:58 PM  
1 votes:

Prank Call of Cthulhu: Another problem that can be easily solved with a suitably motivated neighbor, a ski mask, and a bat with a nail in it.


One neighbor was willing to buy the house. I'll do the bat thing for half that.

/word
 
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