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(Orlando Sentinel)   You too can own a $2.1 million home in Florida for free. Just live in it for seven years on squatter rights and it's yours   (orlandosentinel.com) divider line 282
    More: Florida, squatters, marine transfer operations, Broward counties  
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20619 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Jan 2013 at 12:57 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-24 01:17:30 PM  

ZAZ: In Massachusetts you can get a court order protecting your land from adverse possession. ("registered land")


In Connecticut, they can kick you out of your home because they want to build a shopping mall and your home totes gets in their way.
 
2013-01-24 01:17:48 PM  
Well, this might be a good case for "swatting". See what the guy looks like, say you saw someone with a gun break in...Swat shows up takes him out.....problem solved.

/wonder if this would happen in a state with the Castle doctrine that you can protect your house with deadly force....start squatting in someones vacation house...they show up and just shoot you.
 
2013-01-24 01:18:49 PM  

Insatiable Jesus: Rich ratfarkers pissed that a brown person is ratfarking the system? LOL LOLOLLLLLLOL


Haha yeah, I have no idea how or why this is legal but it is kinda funny to watch the rich folks hem and haw over "OMG poor people"
 
2013-01-24 01:19:26 PM  
And the real owner, Bank of America, isn't responding to questions about the home.

I wonder if they can actually prove ownership. It seems pretty strange that they haven't evicted this guy, yet.
 
2013-01-24 01:19:42 PM  

deanis: A person getting in the way of properly getting this house into actual homeowners hands.


I imagine if the bank doesn't care enough to have squatters removed, they also don't care enough to get the property actually sold. So I'm not so sure they're actually in the way.
 
2013-01-24 01:20:41 PM  
If this goes anything like that guy who tried to squat in a (half million dollar house in Texas?) about a year ago, here's how the thread will go:

It'll get 600 replies.

About 10 people will ask "HOW CAN I DO THAT?"

Then, that's the last you'll hear of it, because this shiat never goes anywhere. I think they did an update on the guy in Texas, and, of course, he was eventually removed.
 
2013-01-24 01:20:59 PM  
Hmmm. I'm in Florida and poor, maybe today I will go house hunting.
 
2013-01-24 01:21:29 PM  

quizzical: It is trespassing. But, per TFA, Bank of America hasn't gotten around to kicking the squatter off their land yet.


Ah. So. Civil matter = need charges.
 
2013-01-24 01:21:34 PM  

NutWrench: And the real owner, Bank of America, isn't responding to questions about the home.

I wonder if they can actually prove ownership. It seems pretty strange that they haven't evicted this guy, yet.


It's not strange, it's pretty typical. It takes a while to evict people. The house isn't magically in some ownership limbo.
 
2013-01-24 01:21:38 PM  
wow. 7 years for adverse possession in florida? that's a little crazy.

it's 10 or 30 years in louisiana (good faith with just title in 10 years, 30 years w/o title or in bad faith) (we also call it acquisitive prescription. an elegant term for a more civilized age).
 
2013-01-24 01:21:45 PM  
Others in the area: why not move in too? Since he's required to have been there for 7 years to claim ownership, he doesn't ave legal right to toss anyone out any more than he can be tossed, so just move on in.

Right?
 
2013-01-24 01:22:26 PM  

Too_many_Brians: Hmmm. I'm in Florida and poor, maybe today I will go house hunting.


Wait for this guy to look the other way and squat his shiat. amirite?
 
2013-01-24 01:22:57 PM  

liam76: Can he get the power/water tunred on?

If not is he allowed to live there?


Quick answer: Yes. I know several Adverse Possession folks. They do it within existing law. Some eventually win the house, some don't. File the appropriate paperwork with the county, move in, andhave the utilities turned on by using the form with which you AP's the house. Easy. Lawful. Every state has a different system, but it can be domne anywhere in the US or in any former British colony.
 
2013-01-24 01:24:21 PM  

Rich Cream: quizzical: It is trespassing. But, per TFA, Bank of America hasn't gotten around to kicking the squatter off their land yet.

Ah. So. Civil matter = need charges.


It's Florida! Just sell the house and the new owner can just shoot the guy as a trespasser. "Stand your ground" and all that.

/or castle doctrine, whichever
 
2013-01-24 01:24:25 PM  

thurstonxhowell: Problem: Squatters.
Solution: Don't fail to step foot in your house even once in 7 years.


lol'd
i mean really.. wtf are we even talking about here
 
2013-01-24 01:26:00 PM  
I imagine he owes the last 7 years in back taxes, then. Or it goes to a foreclosure auction.
Back to BOA, and he can reoccupy it.
 
2013-01-24 01:26:00 PM  

pute kisses like a man: wow. 7 years for adverse possession in florida? that's a little crazy.

it's 10 or 30 years in louisiana (good faith with just title in 10 years, 30 years w/o title or in bad faith) (we also call it acquisitive prescription. an elegant term for a more civilized age).


It might be stated as 7 years, but in reality it's not. It can still go to court, and frequently people trying to claim adverse possession don't win. I've heard of cases of 70, 80 years, property passed down through generations, where someone finally wants to get title or land, re-subdivide land, claim fences, buildings, etc, who can't.
 
2013-01-24 01:26:23 PM  

EVERYBODY PANIC: liam76: Can he get the power/water tunred on?

If not is he allowed to live there?

Quick answer: Yes. I know several Adverse Possession folks. They do it within existing law. Some eventually win the house, some don't. File the appropriate paperwork with the county, move in, andhave the utilities turned on by using the form with which you AP's the house. Easy. Lawful. Every state has a different system, but it can be domne anywhere in the US or in any former British colony.


If I had sustainable investment income and no family I think it would be fun to attempt to gain title to homes in this fashion and if successful sell it to a "working poor" family for a fraction of its value and move on to the next one.
 
2013-01-24 01:27:01 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: Rich Cream: quizzical: It is trespassing. But, per TFA, Bank of America hasn't gotten around to kicking the squatter off their land yet.

Ah. So. Civil matter = need charges.

It's Florida! Just sell the house and the new owner can just shoot the guy as a trespasser. "Stand your ground" and all that.

/or castle doctrine, whichever


Be sure to put him in a hoodie with skittles in the pocket.
 
2013-01-24 01:27:13 PM  

quizzical: It is trespassing. But, per TFA, Bank of America hasn't gotten around to kicking the squatter off their land yet.


This. Adverse possession doesn't work the way this article (and most people) make it out to be. If a rep from Bank of America were to go to the house, bust down the door and tell the guy to get lost, it ends that easily. The guy is trespassing and doesn't own the home. He can declare anything he wants, but as long as that 7 years hasn't passed, he's got nothing.

I wonder if BoA can use this to their advantage? Maybe let the guy pay taxes and upkeep on it until they managed to sell it at auction. Then I'd kick the guy out, close the deal and save a few bucks that way.

NutWrench: I wonder if they can actually prove ownership. It seems pretty strange that they haven't evicted this guy, yet.


Now THAT might be the real issue. With all the shuffling and repackaging of mortgages, maybe they can't.
 
2013-01-24 01:28:08 PM  

lennavan: ZAZ: In Massachusetts you can get a court order protecting your land from adverse possession. ("registered land")

In Connecticut the United States, they can kick you out of your home because they want to build a shopping mall and your home totes gets in their way.



FTFY
 
2013-01-24 01:28:35 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: Rich Cream: quizzical: It is trespassing. But, per TFA, Bank of America hasn't gotten around to kicking the squatter off their land yet.

Ah. So. Civil matter = need charges.

It's Florida! Just sell the house and the new owner can just shoot the guy as a trespasser. "Stand your ground" and all that.

/or castle doctrine, whichever



Not sure that plan was completely thought through.


/skittles lol
 
2013-01-24 01:28:42 PM  

pute kisses like a man: wow. 7 years for adverse possession in florida? that's a little crazy.

it's 10 or 30 years in louisiana (good faith with just title in 10 years, 30 years w/o title or in bad faith) (we also call it acquisitive prescription. an elegant term for a more civilized age).


I think 30 years is too long. Why should useful property be off-limits for a generation? Why should anyone who can go anywhere near that long without exercising any meaningful use of property just keep it?

Seems like the real squatter in cases like this is the owner who purporta to own land he doesn't use and doesn't set foot on for years on end.
 
2013-01-24 01:28:52 PM  

Rich Cream: thurstonxhowell: Problem: Squatters.
Solution: Don't fail to step foot in your house even once in 7 years.

He's 23 years old. I think he plans on staying there seven years.

/trespassing, I don't understand how it's not that. One entity can show papers of ownership (supposedly), the other can't.


An abandoned property can be gained via adverse possession in every state. Florida has a form you fill out and file with the county. Between the time of abandonment and the time a court awards the property back to the mortgage company, AP is lawful and winnable. Tell me, who owns the property? The answer is that it is in the name of the guy who ditched it, and not the bank. The "person of title" (former owner) can have the guy evicted, butr never bothers to do so. The bank has no rights to the property until the courts award the property to the bank, which takes a couple of years right now.
 
2013-01-24 01:29:12 PM  
I'd just burn the house down.
 
2013-01-24 01:29:41 PM  

jst3p: EVERYBODY PANIC: liam76: Can he get the power/water tunred on?

If not is he allowed to live there?

Quick answer: Yes. I know several Adverse Possession folks. They do it within existing law. Some eventually win the house, some don't. File the appropriate paperwork with the county, move in, andhave the utilities turned on by using the form with which you AP's the house. Easy. Lawful. Every state has a different system, but it can be domne anywhere in the US or in any former British colony.

If I had sustainable investment income and no family I think it would be fun to attempt to gain title to homes in this fashion and if successful sell it to a "working poor" family for a fraction of its value and move on to the next one.


Why? They'd just sell it in turn, if they had any sense. Otherwise, "working poor" becomes "completely broke" when they have to start paying the taxes on the place.
 
2013-01-24 01:31:00 PM  

Too_many_Brians: Hmmm. I'm in Florida and poor, maybe today I will go house hunting.


There's dozens of houses in my neighborhood that have been empty for at least 2 years.

Of course, not a single one of them have an ounce of anything that was made of copper left in them.

/The wife and I went to look at a house the other day that not only the regular stuff (AC, pool pumps, and well aerator equipment) stripped, but the copper thieves also took the time to pull the well pump out of the ground and steal it too.
 
2013-01-24 01:31:22 PM  

groppet: So while he is squatting does he have to pay the property taxes? And if he leaves can they just board up the place to prevent him from getting back in?


In Florida, an adverse possessor must file a particular form with the county, occupy the dwelling, pay all taxes and HOA dues where applicable, and make visible improvements over the course of 7 years. If the form is filled out correctly and filed, it is not considered by law to be squatting.
 
2013-01-24 01:31:32 PM  
Rich folks upset that they have to live near the unwashed masses.

Nothing to see here.
 
2013-01-24 01:31:43 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: jst3p: EVERYBODY PANIC: liam76: Can he get the power/water tunred on?

If not is he allowed to live there?

Quick answer: Yes. I know several Adverse Possession folks. They do it within existing law. Some eventually win the house, some don't. File the appropriate paperwork with the county, move in, andhave the utilities turned on by using the form with which you AP's the house. Easy. Lawful. Every state has a different system, but it can be domne anywhere in the US or in any former British colony.

If I had sustainable investment income and no family I think it would be fun to attempt to gain title to homes in this fashion and if successful sell it to a "working poor" family for a fraction of its value and move on to the next one.

Why? They'd just sell it in turn, if they had any sense. Otherwise, "working poor" becomes "completely broke" when they have to start paying the taxes on the place.


I wouldn't do it in million dollar homes, I would imagine that the property taxes on a reasonable place is less than a working poor family pays in rent. On my 210k rental property the property taxes are $1,300 a year. I just think it would be a fun and unique way of helping people.
 
2013-01-24 01:31:54 PM  
The dudes gonna get a few months of free rent. BOA will finally figure out they own the place. They will file the paperwork, dude will get evicted and/or arrested.
 
2013-01-24 01:31:56 PM  

NutWrench: And the real owner, Bank of America, isn't responding to questions about the home.

I wonder if they can actually prove ownership. It seems pretty strange that they haven't evicted this guy, yet.


Exactly. My guess is that they either can't find the original paperwork, or it was robo-signed.
 
2013-01-24 01:32:43 PM  

topcon: Sugarmoobs: If the guy maintains the property and taxes and such (not likely), why should the neighbors care? Its not their business as long as the property in question does not go in to disrepair and brings down their own home values. They should be blaming Bank of America, not this schmo.

Let me guess: You've never owned a house before.

A jobless 23 year old can't even begin to properly maintain a $50,000 house, let alone a $2 million one.



I've been in my house 13 years. I may have missed it in the article where it says he has no job and does not take care of the property.

(rereads article)

Nope. You're still wrong.

I did say it was not likely he was paying taxes or maintaining it. But hey you run with what you want to.
 
2013-01-24 01:32:57 PM  
It's just aggravating, she said, considering how hard she worked to be able to afford a house in the neighborhood.

I support him just to spite this snooty coont. I might send him a pizza.
 
2013-01-24 01:33:03 PM  

EVERYBODY PANIC: groppet: So while he is squatting does he have to pay the property taxes? And if he leaves can they just board up the place to prevent him from getting back in?

In Florida, an adverse possessor must file a particular form with the county, occupy the dwelling, pay all taxes and HOA dues where applicable, and make visible improvements over the course of 7 years. If the form is filled out correctly and filed, it is not considered by law to be squatting.


How do you gain access without "breaking in" and what makes a property abandoned and thus eligible for filing the paperwork?
 
2013-01-24 01:33:21 PM  

EVERYBODY PANIC: An abandoned property can be gained via adverse possession in every state. Florida has a form you fill out and file with the county. Between the time of abandonment and the time a court awards the property back to the mortgage company, AP is lawful and winnable. Tell me, who owns the property? The answer is that it is in the name of the guy who ditched it, and not the bank. The "person of title" (former owner) can have the guy evicted, butr never bothers to do so. The bank has no rights to the property until the courts award the property to the bank, which takes a couple of years right now.



OK. Key word will be "abandonment". Likely not the case, just waiting for processing.
 
2013-01-24 01:33:48 PM  
Yes, go ahead. And when you get caught prior to the state's adverse possession period you'll be charged with burglary, criminal trespass, theft, on the criminal side, then a massive civil suit for trespass plus years worth of rent.

Brilliant plan, chief
 
2013-01-24 01:33:55 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: Why? They'd just sell it in turn, if they had any sense. Otherwise, "working poor" becomes "completely broke" when they have to start paying the taxes on the place.


Presumably a working poor family is currently paying rent somewhere. If he sold it to them for $1, their monthly payments might actually go down. I might recommend a different way of picking on jst3p:

jst3p: If I had sustainable investment income and no family I think it would be fun to attempt to gain title to homes in this fashion and if successful sell it to a "working poor" family for a fraction of its value


So rather than tell the working poor families how to do it themselves so they have a place to live in the meanwhile, you're gonna go ahead and spend the time and obtain the home for free after which you sell it to poor people and make a buck off of them even though you got it for free? You BASTARD.
 
2013-01-24 01:34:30 PM  

gshepnyc: pute kisses like a man: wow. 7 years for adverse possession in florida? that's a little crazy.

it's 10 or 30 years in louisiana (good faith with just title in 10 years, 30 years w/o title or in bad faith) (we also call it acquisitive prescription. an elegant term for a more civilized age).

I think 30 years is too long. Why should useful property be off-limits for a generation? Why should anyone who can go anywhere near that long without exercising any meaningful use of property just keep it?

Seems like the real squatter in cases like this is the owner who purporta to own land he doesn't use and doesn't set foot on for years on end.


Whose opinion is it that the land isn't being used in a useful fashion? I could own 500 acres of prime vacant wooded land. Maybe I enjoy preserving wildlife. Maybe I hunt on it once a year. Maybe I plan on subdividing it in 20 years to pay for my retirement when house prices go up again (in theory.)

These things aren't for you to decide, it's for the owner of the land to decide.
 
2013-01-24 01:35:18 PM  
"Police were called the day after Christmas"

Fark, less than a month so far. Let me know when he sees 120 days.
 
2013-01-24 01:35:22 PM  

Sail The Wide Accountancy: Bank of America owns it right now. The problem seemed to be that Bank of America could bring up the matter in civil court but so far seems unwilling to do so. The only reason this is in the papers is because a rich neighbor is upset that she has to live next to a "riff raff".


Correction: Bank of America does not own the property, and cannot set foot on the AP property until awarded the property at the end of the foreclosure process. The abandoned home is still in the name of the original purchaser, and only the original purchaser can have anybody evicted.
 
2013-01-24 01:35:31 PM  

signaljammer: Imagine a world without adverse possession.


Given how eminent domain is criminally misused in the States, it's perversely funny to see a legally savvy squatter pull this.
 
2013-01-24 01:35:50 PM  

dwrash: Part of adverse possession is you must treat the property as your own.. and that includes paying the real estate taxes on it.


Not every state requires that
 
2013-01-24 01:36:19 PM  
I doubt this 23-year-old Brazilian can afford the upkeep or improvements on the house, much less the taxes. Now wonder the neighbors want him out of their hair.
 
2013-01-24 01:36:21 PM  

jst3p: I wouldn't do it in million dollar homes, I would imagine that the property taxes on a reasonable place is less than a working poor family pays in rent. On my 210k rental property the property taxes are $1,300 a year. I just think it would be a fun and unique way of helping people.


A similar way lawyers are helping people is telling families to refuse to move out of their homes unless the bank can prove the bank owns it. The paperwork on mortgages being sold, resold, bundled and whatnot is such a clusterfark, lots of times they can't produce it. If you tack on your idea to that, there might be a lot of families helped out.
 
2013-01-24 01:36:33 PM  

lennavan: ArcadianRefugee: Why? They'd just sell it in turn, if they had any sense. Otherwise, "working poor" becomes "completely broke" when they have to start paying the taxes on the place.

Presumably a working poor family is currently paying rent somewhere. If he sold it to them for $1, their monthly payments might actually go down. I might recommend a different way of picking on jst3p:

jst3p: If I had sustainable investment income and no family I think it would be fun to attempt to gain title to homes in this fashion and if successful sell it to a "working poor" family for a fraction of its value

So rather than tell the working poor families how to do it themselves so they have a place to live in the meanwhile, you're gonna go ahead and spend the time and obtain the home for free after which you sell it to poor people and make a buck off of them even though you got it for free? You BASTARD.


I would also narrow it down to three working poor families and make them dance for my amusement. The most amusing family wins right to buy the house.
 
2013-01-24 01:38:29 PM  

jst3p: EVERYBODY PANIC: liam76: Can he get the power/water tunred on?

If not is he allowed to live there?

Quick answer: Yes. I know several Adverse Possession folks. They do it within existing law. Some eventually win the house, some don't. File the appropriate paperwork with the county, move in, andhave the utilities turned on by using the form with which you AP's the house. Easy. Lawful. Every state has a different system, but it can be domne anywhere in the US or in any former British colony.

If I had sustainable investment income and no family I think it would be fun to attempt to gain title to homes in this fashion and if successful sell it to a "working poor" family for a fraction of its value and move on to the next one.


Blessing upon you, good sir. There is a movement here in Florida to do exactly that. You should see all the crumbling structures here. Better to AP them, gain title, fix them up and sell them to folks who won't abandon them, or as good, to rent them cheaply, getting struggling folks off the street.
 
2013-01-24 01:39:18 PM  
Here's the bottom line:

Adverse possession doesn't work anything like the article, or previous articles like this, would have you to believe.

There's a reason why you can find several articles about squatters like this one, but never any followup articles saying "Victory! Man successfully takes possession of upscale $2 million house in the Mr. Monopoly Man Pennybags Golf and Country Club!"
 
2013-01-24 01:40:00 PM  
Someone should post up signs with the house address on it that says "COME STAY FOR FREE!".

Cue dozens of homeless people filling up every square foot of the house by the end of the day. Let's see how that asshole squatter likes those apples.
 
2013-01-24 01:40:59 PM  

topcon: gshepnyc: pute kisses like a man: wow. 7 years for adverse possession in florida? that's a little crazy.

it's 10 or 30 years in louisiana (good faith with just title in 10 years, 30 years w/o title or in bad faith) (we also call it acquisitive prescription. an elegant term for a more civilized age).

I think 30 years is too long. Why should useful property be off-limits for a generation? Why should anyone who can go anywhere near that long without exercising any meaningful use of property just keep it?

Seems like the real squatter in cases like this is the owner who purporta to own land he doesn't use and doesn't set foot on for years on end.

Whose opinion is it that the land isn't being used in a useful fashion? I could own 500 acres of prime vacant wooded land. Maybe I enjoy preserving wildlife. Maybe I hunt on it once a year. Maybe I plan on subdividing it in 20 years to pay for my retirement when house prices go up again (in theory.)

These things aren't for you to decide, it's for the owner of the land to decide.


It's a house. It's meant to be lived in by people. Don't be absurd. If you own more land than you need for yourself and your family to live, you are a burden on society that has to deal with people who don't have a home or who don't have enough. You can't justify being a glutton, sorry.
 
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