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(Slate)   Script reveals the long lost ending of "The Shining". We're not saying it was aliens, but...,   (slate.com) divider line 20
    More: Interesting, Lee Unkrich, alternate ending, Jack Torrance, Overlook Hotel, A Serious Man, auteurs, Shelley Duvall, Stanley Kubrick  
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8667 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 23 Jan 2013 at 9:15 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-23 09:46:03 PM  
5 votes:
The "original" ending is in the BOOK.

/Or more likely, King's head. Movies are not the endgame of literature is my point.
2013-01-24 10:57:10 AM  
2 votes:

ekdikeo4: What did you think it meant?


While cleaning his jacket in the bathroom, Grady tells Jack, "You've always been the caretaker". This has significance. Not sure what though.
2013-01-23 10:05:52 PM  
2 votes:

Shadowtag: The "original" ending is in the BOOK.

/Or more likely, King's head. Movies are not the endgame of literature is my point.


Book made into movie is not necessarily movie of book.
2013-01-23 09:49:19 PM  
2 votes:

RoxtarRyan: There are a LOT of theories about this movie, actually, and a good basis for conversation with friends when drunk. I've heard everything from the movie being a satire of life of a rich businessman in the 80's (coke, killing people, and being psychotic) and your lawyer will cover it up for you so you can continue to live the comfy life, or he did all those things and no one noticed because no one cared (everyone too wrapped up in their own world of excess and selfishness), and it was simply about him simply being batshiat nuts.


My theory is that even though he did start to go batshiat nuts at the end, he got away with everything because all those yuppies were so nondescript and interchangeable that no one noticed when any of them disappeared or they thought they saw them somewhere even though they were dead. So nothing Bateman did really mattered. Then Mila Kunis killed him in the sequel.
2013-01-23 08:14:39 PM  
2 votes:
Me walking out of Dreamcatcher: They changed the ending
My now-ex: What do you mean?
Me: In the book Duddits wasn't a farking alien, he was just a psychic retard!

Come to think of it, next time I need a new login Just a Psychic Retard might work.
2013-01-24 04:49:52 PM  
1 votes:

nebulou5: ekdikeo4: nebulou5: I thought that Jack was assimilated into the farked up ghost world of the hotel...and all of the people in the picture were all victims of the hotel over the years and are now stuck forever in that evil spiritual plane, destined to haunt and pull the next suckers in for eternity...

but only during the winter .. ?

Maybe it's the point of that picture....and the reason it CLOSES with that picture. If the hotel closes every winter because of the extreme temperatures, how could it have been open to host such a lavish new years party for the picture to be taken in the first place...so many years before?

Food for thought...


mindlessones.com

It wasn't open during the winter. Though I'll admit, you did get me thinking for a minute.
2013-01-24 03:24:38 PM  
1 votes:

chopit: ekdikeo4: nebulou5: I thought that Jack was assimilated into the farked up ghost world of the hotel...and all of the people in the picture were all victims of the hotel over the years and are now stuck forever in that evil spiritual plane, destined to haunt and pull the next suckers in for eternity...

but only during the winter .. ?

It was a new year's party, so the evil manifests itself most strongly near that time. Seeps into reality and farks it up.


Makes sense, I suppose.  And explains why the hotel is, everafter, closed during the winter.
2013-01-24 10:51:45 AM  
1 votes:
I thought that Jack was assimilated into the farked up ghost world of the hotel...and all of the people in the picture were all victims of the hotel over the years and are now stuck forever in that evil spiritual plane, destined to haunt and pull the next suckers in for eternity...
2013-01-24 10:45:54 AM  
1 votes:
To clarify a little, in the book Jack was literally AT THAT PARTY, that's where he got drunk. But the party both existed in that time period and sort of out of time as well.
2013-01-24 10:44:31 AM  
1 votes:

ekdikeo4: did you think that he was reincarnated? or did you understand what that picture at the end really meant?

I thought it meant that he became part of the hotel's weirdness.


It's more or less the same as Grady appearing, or the bartender, or the guy in the dog suit. The evil of the hotel absorbs its victims into this one event (the party), and that event started to invade the present (those characters appearing and interacting with the Torrence family). Victims are absorbed back into that event, which is why Jack was in the picture of the party. The book is much less vague about it being partly an instance of time literally condensing and the two time periods coexisting.
2013-01-24 01:43:42 AM  
1 votes:
Chapter 21, A Clockwork Orange
2013-01-24 01:11:47 AM  
1 votes:

Mugato: RoxtarRyan: There are a LOT of theories about this movie, actually, and a good basis for conversation with friends when drunk. I've heard everything from the movie being a satire of life of a rich businessman in the 80's (coke, killing people, and being psychotic) and your lawyer will cover it up for you so you can continue to live the comfy life, or he did all those things and no one noticed because no one cared (everyone too wrapped up in their own world of excess and selfishness), and it was simply about him simply being batshiat nuts.

My theory is that even though he did start to go batshiat nuts at the end, he got away with everything because all those yuppies were so nondescript and interchangeable that no one noticed when any of them disappeared or they thought they saw them somewhere even though they were dead. So nothing Bateman did really mattered. Then Mila Kunis killed him in the sequel.


I think that fits with the weird, suspicious look the realtor gives him when he visits the cleaned apartment at the end. But I'm still sticking with my initial theory for the movie that Bateman is fantasizing it all.

The book? I think Bateman did at least most of the murders in the book. (Also, one of those rare movies that are better than the book. My god, that's a movie full of magnificent, plastic performances.)
2013-01-24 12:08:26 AM  
1 votes:

realmolo: Mugato: RoxtarRyan: There are a LOT of theories about this movie, actually, and a good basis for conversation with friends when drunk. I've heard everything from the movie being a satire of life of a rich businessman in the 80's (coke, killing people, and being psychotic) and your lawyer will cover it up for you so you can continue to live the comfy life, or he did all those things and no one noticed because no one cared (everyone too wrapped up in their own world of excess and selfishness), and it was simply about him simply being batshiat nuts.

My theory is that even though he did start to go batshiat nuts at the end, he got away with everything because all those yuppies were so nondescript and interchangeable that no one noticed when any of them disappeared or they thought they saw them somewhere even though they were dead. So nothing Bateman did really mattered. Then Mila Kunis killed him in the sequel.

I just read the book a couple of weeks ago.

My take is that it's all in his head. Patrick Bateman is totally nuts. There are parts in the book where he is obviously having delusional episodes, like when he says that he watched a talk show host interview a Cheerio.

It's a good book, you should read it. It's funny, and there's nothing else like it. Can't say that it has ANY re-read value, though.


I must be really farked up. I've re-read it several times.
2013-01-24 12:07:29 AM  
1 votes:

tenpoundsofcheese: karmaceutical: This is an interesting tidbit, I guess. I never really walked away from a viewing of The Shining with a sense that there wasn't enough 'splaining involved.

did you think that he was reincarnated? or did you understand what that picture at the end really meant?


I thought it meant that he became part of the hotel's weirdness.

What did you think it meant?
2013-01-23 10:43:24 PM  
1 votes:
Who cares about the ending.  MOTHERfarkING ANIMAL SHRUBS WON'T LET ME SLEEP
2013-01-23 10:23:59 PM  
1 votes:
I really like the ending in the book,how Jack dies in the book was far more farked up than the movie.
/Plus Dick lives.
2013-01-23 10:21:05 PM  
1 votes:

Mugato: RoxtarRyan: There are a LOT of theories about this movie, actually, and a good basis for conversation with friends when drunk. I've heard everything from the movie being a satire of life of a rich businessman in the 80's (coke, killing people, and being psychotic) and your lawyer will cover it up for you so you can continue to live the comfy life, or he did all those things and no one noticed because no one cared (everyone too wrapped up in their own world of excess and selfishness), and it was simply about him simply being batshiat nuts.

My theory is that even though he did start to go batshiat nuts at the end, he got away with everything because all those yuppies were so nondescript and interchangeable that no one noticed when any of them disappeared or they thought they saw them somewhere even though they were dead. So nothing Bateman did really mattered. Then Mila Kunis killed him in the sequel.


I just read the book a couple of weeks ago.

My take is that it's all in his head. Patrick Bateman is totally nuts. There are parts in the book where he is obviously having delusional episodes, like when he says that he watched a talk show host interview a Cheerio.

It's a good book, you should read it. It's funny, and there's nothing else like it. Can't say that it has ANY re-read value, though.
2013-01-23 10:05:43 PM  
1 votes:
This guy does an amazing job dissecting Kubric's work and I suggest it to anyone who wants to peer deeper in what he planned.
Rob Ager
Link
2013-01-23 09:34:15 PM  
1 votes:

SnakeLee: This happened with American Psycho too.  I was like, "oh great, so he didn't drop the chainsaw on that chick then?  That was a great shot!  What was the point of this bullshiat exactly?"


There are a LOT of theories about this movie, actually, and a good basis for conversation with friends when drunk. I've heard everything from the movie being a satire of life of a rich businessman in the 80's (coke, killing people, and being psychotic) and your lawyer will cover it up for you so you can continue to live the comfy life, or he did all those things and no one noticed because no one cared (everyone too wrapped up in their own world of excess and selfishness), and it was simply about him simply being batshiat nuts.
2013-01-23 08:54:39 PM  
1 votes:

Mugato: I don't get it. I thought Ullman was going to be another ghost or something. Seems rather pointless. What's the significance of the yellow ball?


29.media.tumblr.com
I have a ball. Perhaps you'd like to bounce it?
 
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