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(Anand Tech)   In a few years, you'll be able to tell kids that you remember the days when Intel made motherboards   (anandtech.com) divider line 46
    More: Sad, Intel, mother boards, Asus, Broadwell  
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2497 clicks; posted to Business » on 23 Jan 2013 at 8:21 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-23 08:23:32 AM  
Not super performance boards (on average) but dang long-lived ones.

Oh, and Foxconn made them. Intel just engineered md branded them.

/still good design though
//on average
 
2013-01-23 08:25:36 AM  
I found a map of major industries around my town and it included a Fairchild semiconductor plant employing lots of people.
 
2013-01-23 08:36:46 AM  
AMD is looking for chip engineers to chart a path away from the desktop PC platform and still remain financially competitive. I think we may finally be seeing the beginning of the end.
 
2013-01-23 08:38:39 AM  
Computer parts fanboi thread.

Asus and now especially an ASRock fan. Have only had one bad Asus board over the last 13 or so years.
/csb
 
2013-01-23 08:41:11 AM  
Surprised they lasted this long.

/ASUS guys in da house give me a shout
 
2013-01-23 08:49:57 AM  

cman: Surprised they lasted this long.

/ASUS guys in da house give me a shout


I'm writing this from my ASUS RoG G75V.

/Dell sucks
//Apple does too
 
2013-01-23 08:50:48 AM  

ajgeek: cman: Surprised they lasted this long.

/ASUS guys in da house give me a shout

I'm writing this from my ASUS RoG G75V.

/Dell sucks
//Apple does too


I love OS X.

I hate Apple and their hardware but love OS X

/Hackintoshers unite
 
2013-01-23 08:52:52 AM  
Another shout out for Asus. My socket A rig was as solid as they come and I was overclocking the sh*t out of an XP mobile athlon.
 
2013-01-23 08:58:34 AM  
Kids in a few years will ask "What's a Mother-Board?"

My home build (2007 vintage) has an Asus MB and a quad core intel. I run Ubuntu 12.04 LTS on it now because I had trouble with XP and the onboard nic. It's a useful machine, can do everything I was doing with Windows: print random stuff, watch Amazon videos, etc. But it's loud and huge.

I'm not a gamer, so I can't imagine building another one, with so many more cheap portable options available.
 
2013-01-23 08:59:20 AM  

cman: ajgeek: cman: Surprised they lasted this long.

/ASUS guys in da house give me a shout

I'm writing this from my ASUS RoG G75V.

/Dell sucks
//Apple does too

I love OS X.

I hate Apple and their hardware but love OS X

/Hackintoshers unite


Hm.  I like OS X well enough, and think they've got great industrial design, but I wish they'd make up their minds about whether they want to be  firstwith features (like Thunderbolt and Retina displays, which you then have to wait for other people to adopt), or  last with features (like card readers, where every other brand had multi-format card readers for years before Apple finally decided to add an SD slot on  some models).  Work's getting me a not-quite-maxed MacBook Air (256GB SSD - the 512GB would have put me over budget) so that I can stop lugging my 3-year-old personal laptop to the office... hope I like it.
 
2013-01-23 09:02:54 AM  

dbirchall: Work's getting me a not-quite-maxed MacBook Air (256GB SSD - the 512GB would have put me over budget) so that I can stop lugging my 3-year-old personal laptop to the office... hope I like it.


It's nice, but mine (2011) has terrible network performance, even on WPA2. Gateway ping response times are all over the map, with some timeouts (wtf?). My work dell, piece of crap that it is, will hum along right next to it. Go figure.
 
2013-01-23 09:03:36 AM  
Was a Gigabyte guy until recently. Asus all the way!

/cyber high-five
 
2013-01-23 09:04:15 AM  
I am going to miss having Intel as a motherboard manufacturer. Overall i have used them exclusively for my last 3 PC builds mostly because they were mostly HTPC builds and i was looking for a bulletproof system that was just going to be rock solid stable 24/7 due to the "wife acceptance factor" and they have done quite well. Other motherboards were either ify in regards to onboard components (largely NICs, cant beat the intel NIC for compatibility and stability) or overpriced for what i was looking for marketed at "enthusiast" boards. It was nice having a middle of the road choice that was just going to work.
 
2013-01-23 09:07:39 AM  

H31N0US: dbirchall: Work's getting me a not-quite-maxed MacBook Air (256GB SSD - the 512GB would have put me over budget) so that I can stop lugging my 3-year-old personal laptop to the office... hope I like it.

It's nice, but mine (2011) has terrible network performance, even on WPA2. Gateway ping response times are all over the map, with some timeouts (wtf?). My work dell, piece of crap that it is, will hum along right next to it. Go figure.


Most of my work is done somewhere that wireless is prohibited, so... I hope the Thunderbolt-to-GigE adapter works. :)
 
2013-01-23 09:11:22 AM  

dbirchall: H31N0US: dbirchall: Work's getting me a not-quite-maxed MacBook Air (256GB SSD - the 512GB would have put me over budget) so that I can stop lugging my 3-year-old personal laptop to the office... hope I like it.

It's nice, but mine (2011) has terrible network performance, even on WPA2. Gateway ping response times are all over the map, with some timeouts (wtf?). My work dell, piece of crap that it is, will hum along right next to it. Go figure.

Most of my work is done somewhere that wireless is prohibited, so... I hope the Thunderbolt-to-GigE adapter works. :)


The fact that one needs to purchase and schlep an adapter just to plug into a goddamn global standard network cable is one of the reason I think Apple sucks and will avoid their products in the future. There are plenty of ultrabooks that feature GigE as standard (I got the macbook for my wife while under the delusion that I would spend less time as IT support. Joke's on me)
 
2013-01-23 09:12:34 AM  
Asus is fine... right up until you have a problem and then have to deal with their tech support. Sent a mobo in three times and the problems with it were never fixed for more then a month. (onboard sound and Lan kept croaking)
 
2013-01-23 09:30:54 AM  

dbirchall: Most of my work is done somewhere that wireless is prohibited, so... I hope the Thunderbolt-to-GigE adapter works.


I use my TB/GigE adapter a few times a week at various client sites.  Never any issues.
 
2013-01-23 09:37:29 AM  

H31N0US: The fact that one needs to purchase and schlep an adapter just to plug into a goddamn global standard network cable is one of the reason I think Apple sucks and will avoid their products in the future.


The fact that goddamn global standard network cable dates back to 1986 (and the 10base-T standard dates back to 1990) makes me wonder it'll finally be replaced.

My laptop doesn't have a DB25 serial port - it has USB.
It doesn't have a Centronics parallel port - it has USB.
It doesn't have a quarter-inch audio jack like my AdLib card did in 1989, it has a bi-directional minijack that also supports optical audio, somehow.
It doesn't have a D-sub 15 (VGA), DVI, ADC or whatever big video-out port, it has a Mini DisplayPort.

So... why hasn't the 8P8C plug gone away?  There was actually a discussion of this just last month on NANOG (read: people far geekier than us).  Looks like the main answer is "installed base and inertia."  So I'll be stuck schlepping an adapter to go from LittleModernPort to BigObsoletePlug, until the next not-so-big thing comes along.
 
2013-01-23 10:20:04 AM  
The group within Intel responsible for building reference designs that are used internally for testing as well as end up as the base for many 3rd party motherboards will not be impacted by this decision either. The reference board group will continue to operate and supply reference designs to Intel partners.

OK Good,
Intel boards themselves are fine, very reliable, but typically fairly light on extra features, bells and whistles.
As long as they continue to provide a jumping off point for the rest I won't worry too much about the quality of 3rd party boards suffering.
 
2013-01-23 10:43:40 AM  

H31N0US: Kids in a few years will ask "What's a Mother-Board?"


Shiat, kids nowadays don't know anything about having to fark with jumpers, IRQ settings, et al.

/Usually run Asus, but went with Gigabyte this build
//Not a gaming rig, just an overkill media server/test lab
///Off my lawn
 
2013-01-23 10:44:52 AM  
Considering desktops are becoming as compact as laptops, that sounds a bit important than who's making them.
 
2013-01-23 10:47:07 AM  
Oh, and if Thunderbolt to Gig-E (or 30-pin to Gig-E, or Lightning to Gig-E, or whatever) feels like an ugly kludge, consider this miniUSB to 100baseT adapter that WalMart sells for use with... radios?
 
2013-01-23 10:59:06 AM  

dbirchall: BigObsoletePlug


How is it obsolete when it is 1) capable of delivering speed faster than most ISPs can provide and 2) everywhere?

One of the benefits of the twisted pair we all know is that you can very easily cut custom lengths and wire a cabinet. Can you imagine a datacenter full of tbolt cables?

The next hardwired standard should be glass, not copper, which makes Apple's FireWire V3.0 just another contender for antiquity, and another vain attempt by Apple to hijack a connectivity standard. F that.
 
2013-01-23 11:07:30 AM  
I guess I'm the only one who likes American Megatrends.
 
2013-01-23 11:27:13 AM  

H31N0US: dbirchall: H31N0US: dbirchall: Work's getting me a not-quite-maxed MacBook Air (256GB SSD - the 512GB would have put me over budget) so that I can stop lugging my 3-year-old personal laptop to the office... hope I like it.

It's nice, but mine (2011) has terrible network performance, even on WPA2. Gateway ping response times are all over the map, with some timeouts (wtf?). My work dell, piece of crap that it is, will hum along right next to it. Go figure.

Most of my work is done somewhere that wireless is prohibited, so... I hope the Thunderbolt-to-GigE adapter works. :)

The fact that one needs to purchase and schlep an adapter just to plug into a goddamn global standard network cable is one of the reason I think Apple sucks and will avoid their products in the future. There are plenty of ultrabooks that feature GigE as standard (I got the macbook for my wife while under the delusion that I would spend less time as IT support. Joke's on me)


I dunno I got an air just because I can't do my Masters work on my work lappy and it was small and light. No where on it would an RJ-45 fit, it's not tall enough at the tallest point to support it. Mine's maxed out and I love it. Even VM'd Win 8 on it which is snappy as hell.
 
2013-01-23 11:27:44 AM  

H31N0US: The next hardwired standard should be glass, not copper, which makes Apple's FireWire V3.0 just another contender for antiquity, and another vain attempt by Apple to hijack a connectivity standard. F that.


Uh... you  do know that TBolt was designed from the outset to run over glass, and that the copper cables were just the first to roll out?  Sumitomo's been shipping glass ones since last Spring, and Corning just announced glass for TBolt  and USB3.
 
2013-01-23 11:30:20 AM  
I anit even AMD!


*get it? MAD.. lolz
 
2013-01-23 11:40:41 AM  
Retail boxed processors will be the next to disappear. Many of Intel's next-gen processors will come with your mobo, soldered on, with only server and "enthusiast" CPUs still socketed.

But in a couple of years, this will be extinct:

i.imgur.com
 
2013-01-23 11:43:48 AM  

FuturePastNow: Retail boxed processors will be the next to disappear. Many of Intel's next-gen processors will come with your mobo, soldered on, with only server and "enthusiast" CPUs still socketed.

But in a couple of years, this will be extinct:


I remember that same prediction from the 90s. As long as there's a market and profit to be had they'll be sold.
 
2013-01-23 11:51:03 AM  

davidphogan: FuturePastNow: Retail boxed processors will be the next to disappear. Many of Intel's next-gen processors will come with your mobo, soldered on, with only server and "enthusiast" CPUs still socketed.

But in a couple of years, this will be extinct:

I remember that same prediction from the 90s. As long as there's a market and profit to be had they'll be sold.


In the 90's it was the death of the harware hobbiest wasn't it? Dell, etc. were going to make systems so cheap it wouldn't make sense to DIY.
 
2013-01-23 12:35:13 PM  

pkellmey: AMD is looking for chip engineers to chart a path away from the desktop PC platform and still remain financially competitive. I think we may finally be seeing the beginning of the end.


Intel isn't leaving the desktop business, they're still making the chipsets for Intel based motherboards, they're just not going to contract Foxconn to make motherboards with their brand slapped on them.
 
2013-01-23 02:59:13 PM  

DoBeDoBeDo:

In the 90's it was the death of the harware hobbiest wasn't it? Dell, etc. were going to make systems so cheap it wouldn't make sense to DIY.


It actually did make sense in some cases. My aunt needed a new PC in the early 00's and it was ~$30 more to buy a new Dell WITH a legit OS and monitor than I could build a system by itself.

/Offloading tech support to Dell?
//Priceless
 
2013-01-23 04:19:04 PM  
ABIT made great boards back in the nForce days, and then when Oskar Wu jumped ship to DFI the greatness followed. However, I've run ASUS for the past two systems I've built simply because I have my money put in to other things. Had some really great overclocking experience with all three, though ASUS is more the "yeah I know enough not to buy crap" brand, not so much an actual hardcore brand.

/remembers drawing on resistors with a pencil to voltmod
//peltier cooling
///asrock is whatever stuff asus didn't want
 
2013-01-23 05:47:09 PM  
I agree with the Farker who said Asus is good until you need support. Their RMA support is horrendous. And as an FYI, Samsung isn't much better.
 
2013-01-23 07:47:15 PM  
DoBeDoBeDo: I dunno I got an air just because I can't do my Masters work on my work lappy and it was small and light. No where on it would an RJ-45 fit, it's not tall enough at the tallest point to support it. Mine's maxed out and I love it. Even VM'd Win 8 on it which is snappy as hell.

They should have made a plug that works similar to how USB to ethernet dongles work (where the plug is at a 45 degree angle and the lid becomes part of the retention mechanism).

images.highspeedbackbone.net

// except, make the damn retention mechanism out of metal, not plastic like linksys did.
 
2013-01-23 08:04:37 PM  
H31N0US:
The fact that one needs to purchase and schlep an adapter just to plug into a goddamn global standard network cable is one of the reason I think Apple sucks and will avoid their products in the future. There are plenty of ultrabooks that feature GigE as standard (I got the macbook for my wife while under the delusion that I would spend less time as IT support. Joke's on me)

Get ready to broaden your teeth-gnashing hate-fest then.  'Plenty of ultrabooks with GigE' doesn't include the Asus Xenbook, the Dell XPS 13, or the Lenovo X1.  All either come with a USB ethernet adapter, or nothing at all.  Only the Toshiba Portegé has a built in RJ45 port.

And I hope you're sitting down for this- none of them come with a floppy drive, either.  You're just going to have to find another way to load Windows 3.1 onto your notebook.

Seriously- it ain't a big deal.  I manage multiple networks, and am one of the few people that has legitimate reason to actually pack the adapter around with me, and I don't find it inconvenient.  I can't speak for the other ultrabooks, but with Apple it happens to be the perfect size to slide in alongside my pens in their little holsters in my notebook bag.  Personally, I've found the lack of an optical drive to be marginally more inconvenient than the loss of RJ45.
 
2013-01-23 08:22:37 PM  

lordargent: DoBeDoBeDo: I dunno I got an air just because I can't do my Masters work on my work lappy and it was small and light. No where on it would an RJ-45 fit, it's not tall enough at the tallest point to support it. Mine's maxed out and I love it. Even VM'd Win 8 on it which is snappy as hell.

They should have made a plug that works similar to how USB to ethernet dongles work (where the plug is at a 45 degree angle and the lid becomes part of the retention mechanism).


Or... anybody remember these, from the '90s?  I probably still have 1 or 2 at home.

images.esellerpro.com
 
2013-01-23 10:54:29 PM  
dbirchall : Or... anybody remember these, from the '90s? I probably still have 1 or 2 at home.

Remember the gradual reduction in size internal add in network cards, you know, in the days before Ethernet was just integrated with the mobo.

IIRC, they got down to the point where the PCB was only 1/4th of the height of the bracket.
 
2013-01-23 11:31:15 PM  

FuturePastNow: Retail boxed processors will be the next to disappear. Many of Intel's next-gen processors will come with your mobo, soldered on, with only server and "enthusiast" CPUs still socketed.

But in a couple of years, this will be extinct:

[i.imgur.com image 300x300]


That's OK for me. Usually by the time I get around to upgrading, I end up having to buy a new motherboard anyways.
 
2013-01-23 11:42:37 PM  
So paint an Intel logo on your motherboard. This means jack and shiat.
 
2013-01-24 12:11:38 AM  
Intel motherboards were rock solid for production environments. Dependable and stable is what most businesses need. I have found a lot of bad Asus boards in the last 5 years.

Currently I go with MSI and Intel in my client's machines. MSI was one of the first to move to entirely dry capacitors, and I have found their boards take our town's crappy power grid in stride compared to companies still using wet capacitors, YMMV.
 
2013-01-24 01:14:07 AM  

crab66: So paint an Intel logo on your motherboard. This means jack and shiat.


Ah, I remember the days of those decals... before Steve Jobs told Intel that oh, yes, sure, they'd love to use the CPUs, but there was no farking way in hell they were going to put that logo on an otherwise all-white, all-black or all-silver laptop.

/It's a computer, not a sprint car.
 
2013-01-24 03:22:00 AM  
I've always used Asus mobo's, a little more expensive but well worth every penny. Never had a single problem with one yet.
 
2013-01-24 11:57:47 AM  
Who really cares? Maybe 10 years ago, it made a difference if you had an Intel Vs. ChingChong brand, but they are all pretty much equal now in quality (I thought ASRock was a junk brand a couple years ago, but it looks like they have improved as well).

\Build computers every few years for personal use or family
\Never an issue with the Gigabyte or Biostar boards I've used, even when I've purposely tried to destroy them.
 
2013-01-24 01:08:41 PM  

iaazathot: I have found a lot of bad Asus boards in the last 5 years.


Yup, same here. Been using ASRock on my more recent builds. They seem to be solid.... so far.
 
2013-01-24 01:50:51 PM  
MBZ321: Who really cares? Maybe 10 years ago, it made a difference if you had an Intel Vs. ChingChong brand

I always considered intel boards to be like the reference design. IE, intel saying "here is our chipset, and here is a board that shows you how to use it".

Then other manufacturers either directly copy it (look, it's an intel board, but we put it on a RED pcb, give us money). Or, they take the reference design and soup it up to make it different (look at this, we've got twelve USB ports) (ohh yeah, well we have RAID built in)(screw you guys, we've got four AGP slots so you can use four video cards for a total of eight monitors).
 
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