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(Some Guy)   After updating your VHS tapes to DVD and then to Blu-ray, you can look forward to upgrading to Ultra-High Definition in another 3-4 years   ( desktopreview.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Blu-ray, video cameras, DVD, VHS, bandwidth cap, installed base, file sizes  
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2078 clicks; posted to Geek » on 23 Jan 2013 at 11:21 AM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



116 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2013-01-23 10:03:08 AM  
I never bothered to upgrade my DVDs to Blu-Rays. And I still own a working and currently connected VCR.
 
2013-01-23 10:03:41 AM  
Did anyone really go all out and upgrade to Blu ray, except your hardcore people who insist on having the newest toys?

They hardly released anything beyond new films in the format. It's already pretty much leveled off.

Regular DVD is still the go-to format for now. Eventually, it'll all be Downloads. But blu is nothing more than the new Millennium's laser disc.
 
2013-01-23 11:12:05 AM  

FirstNationalBastard: Did anyone really go all out and upgrade to Blu ray, except your hardcore people who insist on having the newest toys?


I just got one last week so it's hardly a new toy. They're less than $100 now. I replaced my DVDs like Star Wars, Raiders, Blade Runner, things like that and they're gorgeous. Jaws looks like it was shot yesterday. And they all have a ton of extras if you're into that. I'm not going to go out and replace Caddyshack or anything but for big FX movies it's really worth it.
 
2013-01-23 11:24:39 AM  
At this point, physical media is a fool's game. I got rid of all my CDs and DVDs.

Exception: art prints and photobooks.
 
2013-01-23 11:27:04 AM  
Um... why? Conversion from one digital format to another doesn't actually add any definition (well, unless you want to potentially add artefacts to the picture with predicative processing). Once you've gone from VHS to DVD you've done all the converting you need, modern players have to trouble reading DVDs as well as HD formats and there's no reason they'd ever lose that capability so long as we're using circular optical media in general.

//If they mean "upgrading" in the sense of "buying a remastered version in the new format", I guess that makes slightly more sense. I remember we used to have two versions of the moon landing tapes, on VHS and on DVD, because the original film stock has ridiculous clarity that wasn't really reflected on the newsreel copy they used for the VHS version.
 
2013-01-23 11:27:14 AM  
Netflix and other streaming services will be the go to way to watch movies in the near future. I can understand ultra high def televisions, but for the physical media I don't see many people converting.
 
2013-01-23 11:28:08 AM  
I ripped all my DVDs to MP4 and watch them over the network. Blu-ray might be better, but not enough for me to care. And certainly not enough to pay an extra $7 per disc.
 
2013-01-23 11:28:28 AM  

Cluckity: At this point, physical media is a fool's game. I got rid of all my CDs and DVDs.


I like having physical media. I don't understand how you can get all the extras on a film that you download. Besides, since I never learned to read, instead of a library full of books to display I have DVDs. I don't trust "the cloud" anyway.
 
2013-01-23 11:28:59 AM  

Cythraul: I never bothered to upgrade my DVDs to Blu-Rays. And I still own a working and currently connected VCR.


And a VCR will connect to a cable box and record a 1080 signal. It won't be as crystal clear as the original transmission, but if you've ever streamed 360 or 480 video through a Roku or AppleTV, you know it's more than fine.

I'd upgrade my internet speed and stream 1080 content through Netflix if I was that concerned. As it stands, my DVD player upconverts just fine.
 
2013-01-23 11:30:41 AM  

NewWorldDan: I ripped all my DVDs to MP4 and watch them over the network. Blu-ray might be better, but not enough for me to care. And certainly not enough to pay an extra $7 per disc.


This.

Added bonus: not having to wade through bullshiat "preview of upcoming attractions", FBI warnings, dumbass menu flourishes, and other retarded crap the entertainment industry tries to shove down our throats.
 
2013-01-23 11:32:05 AM  
Considering I can't physically tell the difference at less than 6 feet and I don't own a movie theater, I'll pass.
 
2013-01-23 11:32:34 AM  
DVDs look fine on my Blu Ray player, so I'm only going to upgrade the movies I watch regularly that are the 'eye candy' films.

Of course, I also don't buy as many movies as I used to overall anyway.
 
2013-01-23 11:33:04 AM  

illegal.tender: Added bonus: not having to wade through bullshiat "preview of upcoming attractions", FBI warnings, dumbass menu flourishes, and other retarded crap the entertainment industry tries to shove down our throats.


But when you watch on netflix, amazon, or any other digital provider, none of this is shown. WTF?
 
2013-01-23 11:33:06 AM  
Having gone from LPs to tapes to CDs I learned a lesson: skip a generation (or two) of media, it will save you money.

/still owns a CRT TV, no reason to by Blu-Ray.
 
2013-01-23 11:34:03 AM  
I don't understand the point of BluRay.

It doesn't look any better. You people have just fallen victim to the Emperor's New Clothes scam.
 
2013-01-23 11:36:09 AM  

Orgasmatron138: DVDs look fine on my Blu Ray player, so I'm only going to upgrade the movies I watch regularly that are the 'eye candy' films.

Of course, I also don't buy as many movies as I used to overall anyway.


Pretty much this. I have no desire to upgrade some of my movies, like Down Periscope, but I am thrilled with the upgraded copies of movies like Fifth Element, Star Wars, and even Casablanca.

Eye candy films, as well as older films that are now finally getting a great transfer, are well worth the upgrade.
 
2013-01-23 11:37:36 AM  

Cluckity: At this point, physical media is a fool's game. I got rid of all my CDs and DVDs.

Exception: art prints and photobooks.


That's funny.

Yeah, try that when there's a server failure, or your ISP is down, or you have to go somewhere there is no signal, or the service you're using loses the license for your favorite movie/TV show and takes it down.

Physical media means you maintain positive control of the entire thing, instead of leaving it up to a combination of legalities and network issues.

Remember when Netflix went down on Christmas Eve? Was down for most of the night.

I've had favorite films that I liked to watch and re-watch vanish off online services because the license ran out.

If you don't have practically unlimited bandwidth, streaming media services are right out, so it's not really feasible while mobile (unlike taking my DVDs and popping them in the drive of my laptop).

When you buy the DVD, you sidestep all that. You own the physical media, you control when you watch it, and they can't come around and take it back or tell you to stop watching it (well, I guess they could try, but not practically do so).

Personally, I never bought into Blu-Ray. Seemed like a scam to get people to buy the same old movies over on new discs. DVDs offered a clear advantage over VHS: they were smaller, offered clearly superior picture quality, had room for special features and alternate audio tracks (commentaries, other languages), and didn't suffer from media degradation and susceptibility to magnetic fields like magnetic tape media could.

Blu-Ray just meant buying a new player and re-buying everything for a marginal increase in picture quality that you had to buy a new TV to get as well. No thank you.

I have a Netflix subscription, but that's just for casual watching of things, to supplement a more permanent library.
 
2013-01-23 11:40:45 AM  
My decision to skip blu rays will finally pay off!!

We would always laugh at my grandfather who had a black and white tv and insisted that he was waiting for "3D technology" before he considered purchasing a new one. 3D tv?! That will never happen grandpa.

Grandpa died in 1987.
 
2013-01-23 11:41:08 AM  

Whatthefark: Netflix and other streaming services will be the go to way to watch movies in the near future. I can understand ultra high def televisions, but for the physical media I don't see many people converting.


I'm still wondering if this will ever happen. The ISP's don't seem to be making great strides in speed, save for a few dense urban area's where they are experimenting. Add to the fact that many of them have data caps and suddenly streaming doesn't seem so great. Imagine Saturday night when thousands decide to have movie night only to find out that the service is crap because the ISP's infrastructure is overloaded. Having to wait for the movie to buffer can be a real buzzkill. And for those with HD screens who want HD content, it wont take many movies per month to max out their data caps.
 
2013-01-23 11:42:39 AM  

doczoidberg: It doesn't look any better. You people have just fallen victim to the Emperor's New Clothes scam.


I don't know which Blu Ray you watched or on what TV but I disagree. I thought the same way until I actually got one.
 
2013-01-23 11:44:31 AM  

Silverstaff: Cluckity: At this point, physical media is a fool's game. I got rid of all my CDs and DVDs.

Exception: art prints and photobooks.

That's funny.

Yeah, try that when there's a server failure, or your ISP is down, or you have to go somewhere there is no signal, or the service you're using loses the license for your favorite movie/TV show and takes it down.

Physical media means you maintain positive control of the entire thing, instead of leaving it up to a combination of legalities and network issues.

Remember when Netflix went down on Christmas Eve? Was down for most of the night.

I've had favorite films that I liked to watch and re-watch vanish off online services because the license ran out.

If you don't have practically unlimited bandwidth, streaming media services are right out, so it's not really feasible while mobile (unlike taking my DVDs and popping them in the drive of my laptop).

When you buy the DVD, you sidestep all that. You own the physical media, you control when you watch it, and they can't come around and take it back or tell you to stop watching it (well, I guess they could try, but not practically do so).

Personally, I never bought into Blu-Ray. Seemed like a scam to get people to buy the same old movies over on new discs. DVDs offered a clear advantage over VHS: they were smaller, offered clearly superior picture quality, had room for special features and alternate audio tracks (commentaries, other languages), and didn't suffer from media degradation and susceptibility to magnetic fields like magnetic tape media could.

Blu-Ray just meant buying a new player and re-buying everything for a marginal increase in picture quality that you had to buy a new TV to get as well. No thank you.

I have a Netflix subscription, but that's just for casual watching of things, to supplement a more permanent library.


www.globalnerdy.com
 
2013-01-23 11:45:18 AM  

Silverstaff:
Physical media means you maintain positive control of the entire thing, instead of leaving it up to a combination of legalities and network issues.

...

When you buy the DVD, you sidestep all that. You own the physical media, you control when you watch it, and they can't come around and take it back or tell you to stop watching it (well, I guess they could try, but not practically do so).


They've tried.
 
2013-01-23 11:47:06 AM  
I only stream these days.
 
2013-01-23 11:47:55 AM  

Silverstaff: Remember when Netflix went down on Christmas Eve? Was down for most of the night.


I remember this. I went to bed early. It was great.

I'm ok with films being impermanent things in my life. If it's unavailable I'll watch something else or watch nothing at all.
 
2013-01-23 11:49:44 AM  

Mugato: doczoidberg: It doesn't look any better. You people have just fallen victim to the Emperor's New Clothes scam.

I don't know which Blu Ray you watched or on what TV but I disagree. I thought the same way until I actually got one.


Yeah, and it can also sometimes depend on the actual film you're watching. Some Blu-Ray discs, especially early ones, were merely upscaled versions of the DVD in order to cash in. Other Blu-Rays of catalog films have gone through completely new restorations, specifically for the Blu-Ray release. Even content like The Twilight Zone or Star Trek: TNG looks absolutely stunning on Blu-Ray. The original DVD releases of them aren't even in the same ballpark.
 
rpm
2013-01-23 11:50:04 AM  

Silverstaff: Physical media means you maintain positive control of the entire thing, instead of leaving it up to a combination of legalities and network issues.


BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAH.

You are aware that BluRay can revoke keys and cause you to lose access, right?
 
2013-01-23 11:51:23 AM  

Mugato: FirstNationalBastard: Did anyone really go all out and upgrade to Blu ray, except your hardcore people who insist on having the newest toys?

I just got one last week so it's hardly a new toy. They're less than $100 now. I replaced my DVDs like Star Wars, Raiders, Blade Runner, things like that and they're gorgeous. Jaws looks like it was shot yesterday. And they all have a ton of extras if you're into that. I'm not going to go out and replace Caddyshack or anything but for big FX movies it's really worth it.


Hey, I get where you're coming from... I'm buying the Star Trek: TNG Blu discs, because damn, they're worth it.

But other than that, I can't see buying a Citizen Kane blu-ray, because what is going to be different from the regular DVD version I already own?
 
2013-01-23 11:52:36 AM  

NeoCortex42: Mugato: doczoidberg: It doesn't look any better. You people have just fallen victim to the Emperor's New Clothes scam.

I don't know which Blu Ray you watched or on what TV but I disagree. I thought the same way until I actually got one.

Yeah, and it can also sometimes depend on the actual film you're watching. Some Blu-Ray discs, especially early ones, were merely upscaled versions of the DVD in order to cash in. Other Blu-Rays of catalog films have gone through completely new restorations, specifically for the Blu-Ray release. Even content like The Twilight Zone or Star Trek: TNG looks absolutely stunning on Blu-Ray. The original DVD releases of them aren't even in the same ballpark.


Well, TNG looked like crap on DVD because it was just the 480i videotape masters slapped on disc. The Blu discs are completely remastered and re-edited from the 35mm negatives, making TNG look amazing.
 
2013-01-23 11:55:07 AM  
If you can't tell the difference between a dvd and blu ray, you are blind. Or old. Or poor and bitter.
 
2013-01-23 11:58:03 AM  

FirstNationalBastard: NeoCortex42: Mugato: doczoidberg: It doesn't look any better. You people have just fallen victim to the Emperor's New Clothes scam.

I don't know which Blu Ray you watched or on what TV but I disagree. I thought the same way until I actually got one.

Yeah, and it can also sometimes depend on the actual film you're watching. Some Blu-Ray discs, especially early ones, were merely upscaled versions of the DVD in order to cash in. Other Blu-Rays of catalog films have gone through completely new restorations, specifically for the Blu-Ray release. Even content like The Twilight Zone or Star Trek: TNG looks absolutely stunning on Blu-Ray. The original DVD releases of them aren't even in the same ballpark.

Well, TNG looked like crap on DVD because it was just the 480i videotape masters slapped on disc. The Blu discs are completely remastered and re-edited from the 35mm negatives, making TNG look amazing.


That was my point. When the studio puts in the extra effort like they are for TNG, the results can be astounding. The increase in quality is not only because of the format. It's also because of the material finally getting a decent restoration. Since that restoration is only available on the Blu-Ray release, the Blu-Ray release is far superior to the only DVD release.

FirstNationalBastard: Hey, I get where you're coming from... I'm buying the Star Trek: TNG Blu discs, because damn, they're worth it.

But other than that, I can't see buying a Citizen Kane blu-ray, because what is going to be different from the regular DVD version I already own?


I can't speak to Citizen Kane, but the restoration and Blu-Ray release of Casablanca was well worth the upgrade. Depending on how big a fan you are of older titles, some of them are absolutely worth upgrading if they get a proper transfer.
 
2013-01-23 11:59:17 AM  
I have bought a few BluRays to watch on my PS3, although I too have put all my DVDs onto a NAS server in my living room and boxed them into storage.

I won't buy a movie on BluRay just to do it, but a few of the movies are night-and-day, especially the newer ones. Wall-E for example, I got a DVD+BR combo pack and you can absolutely tell, even from the kitchen. The Imax bits in Batman 2+3 also.

I'm no snob but if you claim there's no difference between the two, go check out the Planet Earth bluray set or Baraka, those are amazing.
 
2013-01-23 12:00:23 PM  

rpm: Silverstaff: Physical media means you maintain positive control of the entire thing, instead of leaving it up to a combination of legalities and network issues.

BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAH.

You are aware that BluRay can revoke keys and cause you to lose access, right?


You can't revoke keys on a player that doesn't have internet access (well, unless you copy files to a USB and move it over manually, but then you'd be pretty dumb to if you wanted to avoid this)

Besides, the master key was leaked a while back, wasn't it?
 
2013-01-23 12:00:44 PM  
It's not that I can't tell the difference between dvd and blu ray. The difference just doesn't enhance my enjoyment of a film.

Good sound. A decent display that's reasonably close enough for me to block out visual distractions. Clever camera work and a story well told. That's all I need.
 
2013-01-23 12:01:21 PM  

Electromax: I have bought a few BluRays to watch on my PS3, although I too have put all my DVDs onto a NAS server in my living room and boxed them into storage.

I won't buy a movie on BluRay just to do it, but a few of the movies are night-and-day, especially the newer ones. Wall-E for example, I got a DVD+BR combo pack and you can absolutely tell, even from the kitchen. The Imax bits in Batman 2+3 also.

I'm no snob but if you claim there's no difference between the two, go check out the Planet Earth bluray set or Baraka, those are amazing.


Any popular animated movie looks astonishingly better on bluray.
 
2013-01-23 12:02:39 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: But other than that, I can't see buying a Citizen Kane blu-ray, because what is going to be different from the regular DVD version I already own?


If they're re-scanning an original print with whatever improvements in resolution and in optics, possibly quite a bit. There may also be audio enhancements, new commentary tracks or interactive features. Something like Citizen Kane or Lawrence of Arabia would most likely be a showpiece for any new format and might very well be worth re-acquiring.
 
2013-01-23 12:03:07 PM  

rpm: Silverstaff: Physical media means you maintain positive control of the entire thing, instead of leaving it up to a combination of legalities and network issues.

BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAH.

You are aware that BluRay can revoke keys and cause you to lose access, right?


I might be wrong, but the AACS keys are meant to be revoked at the device (application) level like what happened with WinDVD 8, right?

There isn't any danger that someone could yank back your ability to play your disks, just invalidate the ability for your chosen player to play any of a number of disks from media or hardware manufacturers who don't conform to the standard.
 
2013-01-23 12:06:59 PM  

likefunbutnot: FirstNationalBastard: But other than that, I can't see buying a Citizen Kane blu-ray, because what is going to be different from the regular DVD version I already own?

If they're re-scanning an original print with whatever improvements in resolution and in optics, possibly quite a bit. There may also be audio enhancements, new commentary tracks or interactive features. Something like Citizen Kane or Lawrence of Arabia would most likely be a showpiece for any new format and might very well be worth re-acquiring.


IIRC, there are no original prints of Citizen Kane left, and all restorations done in the DVD era have been done off of beat up prints sent out to theaters ages ago that have been digitally cleaned and enhanced. If there's ever a Sunset Boulevard or Roman Holiday blu released, those will be in the same boat as Kane.

But, you're right... if I can find Kane at the right price, it might be worth checking out.
 
2013-01-23 12:09:32 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: IIRC, there are no original prints of Citizen Kane left, and all restorations done in the DVD era have been done off of beat up prints sent out to theaters ages ago that have been digitally cleaned and enhanced. If there's ever a Sunset Boulevard or Roman Holiday blu released, those will be in the same boat as Kane.

But, you're right... if I can find Kane at the right price, it might be worth checking out.


I'm still waiting for the HD release of Manos: Link
 
2013-01-23 12:11:30 PM  

Jim_Callahan: Um... why? Conversion from one digital format to another doesn't actually add any definition (well, unless you want to potentially add artefacts to the picture with predicative processing). Once you've gone from VHS to DVD you've done all the converting you need, modern players have to trouble reading DVDs as well as HD formats and there's no reason they'd ever lose that capability so long as we're using circular optical media in general.

//If they mean "upgrading" in the sense of "buying a remastered version in the new format", I guess that makes slightly more sense. I remember we used to have two versions of the moon landing tapes, on VHS and on DVD, because the original film stock has ridiculous clarity that wasn't really reflected on the newsreel copy they used for the VHS version.


Depends. I remember reading an article back a few years ago saying that Paramount was scanning all their movies in something like 8 Mega-pixel resolution and just sitting on them. So they can down-convert the video to what-ever the new format is and won't have to re-scan every few years.
Pre-planning like that is somewhat rare.
 
2013-01-23 12:13:04 PM  

rpm: Silverstaff: Physical media means you maintain positive control of the entire thing, instead of leaving it up to a combination of legalities and network issues.

BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAH.

You are aware that BluRay can revoke keys and cause you to lose access, right?


No, but if you'll read the rest of my post, you'd find I consciously chose to avoid Blu-Ray, seeing no need for it compared to DVD.

You just gave me yet another reason to stick with DVD and another reason that Blu-Ray is inferior.

Wait, how would they even revoke the keys? Does it have to be plugged into the internet to even work?
 
2013-01-23 12:14:49 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: But other than that, I can't see buying a Citizen Kane blu-ray, because what is going to be different from the regular DVD version I already own?


Well any transfer of any movie isn't going to look as good as if you're actually sitting in a theater watching the original 35mm print. So even a movie like Citizen Kane would look better on Blu Ray but you're right, movies like that aren't really worth replacing.

Besides which I don't even know if the original CK even exists anymore. They keep them in climate controlled vaults but they still degrade over time. I remember Steven Spielberg coming on TV begging people to donate money to a preservation fund for original prints. Because he'd help out but you know, he's really strapped for cash.
 
2013-01-23 12:15:12 PM  

Witty_Retort: Jim_Callahan: Um... why? Conversion from one digital format to another doesn't actually add any definition (well, unless you want to potentially add artefacts to the picture with predicative processing). Once you've gone from VHS to DVD you've done all the converting you need, modern players have to trouble reading DVDs as well as HD formats and there's no reason they'd ever lose that capability so long as we're using circular optical media in general.

//If they mean "upgrading" in the sense of "buying a remastered version in the new format", I guess that makes slightly more sense. I remember we used to have two versions of the moon landing tapes, on VHS and on DVD, because the original film stock has ridiculous clarity that wasn't really reflected on the newsreel copy they used for the VHS version.

Depends. I remember reading an article back a few years ago saying that Paramount was scanning all their movies in something like 8 Mega-pixel resolution and just sitting on them. So they can down-convert the video to what-ever the new format is and won't have to re-scan every few years.
Pre-planning like that is somewhat rare.


Yeah, but when the companies think ahead, it usually works out very well for them... like when Universal thought ahead 15 years and shot stuff like Law and Order in 16x9 starting in 1993 so that when widescreen came, they already had everything from season 4 forward ready for syndication.
 
2013-01-23 12:15:42 PM  
DVD is 2 times sharper than VHS (luma pixels)
Blu-ray is 6 times sharper than DVD
The movie you saw in the theater is 14 times the resolution of Blu-ray or 86 times the resolution of DVD

Blu-ray is still TOO blurry. People are simply used to it. I think it is reasonable to want a 60 inch TV image to display near 300 DPI (which a "4k tv" still wont come close). After that, then you will get into territory where someone could honestly say they can't tell the difference. (obviously depends on viewing distance)

/end rant
 
2013-01-23 12:18:01 PM  
Whoever thinks that there's no difference between a movie like Sunshine on DVD and Blu-Ray needs to see an eye doctor or learn how to hook up their system properly.

I pick up a few scattered Blu-Ray movies they have at Best Buy here and there, only cause they're overstocked and selling for $8 a pop. Older movies, yea...no need to upgrade. Not much difference (unless it was remastered). But any recent FX heavy movie looks worlds better than DVD. So much so you gotta turn the resolution down to prevent that hyper real effect.

/Won't be upgrading anytime soon. Blu-Ray is good enough for a long while.
 
2013-01-23 12:20:16 PM  

Elemental79: After that, then you will get into territory where someone could honestly say they can't tell the difference. (obviously depends on viewing distance)


Of course, we can't make panels that support that sort of resolution in any sort of affordable fashion. It might be cheaper to move to projection-based systems at that point, but then you run into issues with installation and maintenance that most people don't want to be bothered with.
 
2013-01-23 12:23:50 PM  
The beauty of the PS3 is that I think it actually makes DVDs look better.
 
2013-01-23 12:24:57 PM  
Physical media is dead.

Just wait until next year when Amazon rips the DVD you buy and stores it in the cloud for you.
 
2013-01-23 12:25:54 PM  
Someone wanna clear this up for me?  I thought UltraHD is the 2,048 pixel height, and 4K is (as the name suggests) a next-next-gen 4,000-odd pixel height.  Are they actually one and the same, and if so, why is it 4K and not 2K?
 
2013-01-23 12:28:42 PM  

Cluckity: It's not that I can't tell the difference between dvd and blu ray. The difference just doesn't enhance my enjoyment of a film.

Good sound. A decent display that's reasonably close enough for me to block out visual distractions. Clever camera work and a story well told. That's all I need.


I know right. Kids these day.

I only use this.
www.tvhistory.tv
 
2013-01-23 12:28:58 PM  
<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UltraHD " target="_blank">Meh.</a>  4 times the pixels.  Check...
 
2013-01-23 12:31:35 PM  

Jim_Callahan: Um... why? Conversion from one digital format to another doesn't actually add any definition (well, unless you want to potentially add artefacts to the picture with predicative processing). Once you've gone from VHS to DVD you've done all the converting you need, modern players have to trouble reading DVDs as well as HD formats and there's no reason they'd ever lose that capability so long as we're using circular optical media in general.

//If they mean "upgrading" in the sense of "buying a remastered version in the new format", I guess that makes slightly more sense. I remember we used to have two versions of the moon landing tapes, on VHS and on DVD, because the original film stock has ridiculous clarity that wasn't really reflected on the newsreel copy they used for the VHS version.


most HD remasters of old stuff go back to the original 35mm and do a trasnfer there.. so yeah you're seeing better res

but most people don't bother to rebuy most of their movies. i did it for like.. one.
 
2013-01-23 12:34:39 PM  
What I still don't get about downloading movies is where are the extras? Like interactive menus, making of documentaries, commentaries, things like that. I guess most people don't care about that stuff but film geeks do.
 
2013-01-23 12:35:02 PM  

Kazan: Jim_Callahan: Um... why? Conversion from one digital format to another doesn't actually add any definition (well, unless you want to potentially add artefacts to the picture with predicative processing). Once you've gone from VHS to DVD you've done all the converting you need, modern players have to trouble reading DVDs as well as HD formats and there's no reason they'd ever lose that capability so long as we're using circular optical media in general.

//If they mean "upgrading" in the sense of "buying a remastered version in the new format", I guess that makes slightly more sense. I remember we used to have two versions of the moon landing tapes, on VHS and on DVD, because the original film stock has ridiculous clarity that wasn't really reflected on the newsreel copy they used for the VHS version.

most HD remasters of old stuff go back to the original 35mm and do a trasnfer there.. so yeah you're seeing better res

but most people don't bother to rebuy most of their movies. i did it for like.. one.


The other problem is that most TV shows would never be worth upgrading even if they did come out on bluray, because videotaped shows would never look any better, the companies would stupidly tilt and scan their filmed shows so they filled the whole screen (because people is skeered of them mean ol' black bars on the sides of the screen), and TV on DVD is already a niche market, and going HD wouldn't make a profit for the studios.
 
2013-01-23 12:35:39 PM  

Parallax: Someone wanna clear this up for me?  I thought UltraHD is the 2,048 pixel height, and 4K is (as the name suggests) a next-next-gen 4,000-odd pixel height.  Are they actually one and the same, and if so, why is it 4K and not 2K?


It's 3940x2160, twice the height and twice the width. Four times the pixels. And 3940 pixels wide is pretty close to 4,000.

mcreadyblue: Physical media is dead.

Just wait until next year when Amazon rips the DVD you buy and stores it in the cloud for you.


I've been ripping and storing DVDs and Blu-Rays I get for 13 years or so. There's still a point to physical media as a distribution mechanism, but I think it's silly to actually WATCH content from the stupid things.
 
2013-01-23 12:36:24 PM  

Mugato: What I still don't get about downloading movies is where are the extras? Like interactive menus, making of documentaries, commentaries, things like that. I guess most people don't care about that stuff but film geeks do.


Personally, I can think of a handful of movies where the extras are worth anything at all.

/UHF: Best commentary ever.
 
2013-01-23 12:36:38 PM  
If you are interested in remastering/restoring old movies for HD, a couple more interesting recent cases:

Restoring the Godfather
Harmy's "Despecialized" Star Wars OT (Removed the 1997 effects but remastered to extremely high quality, closest you'll get to the original 1977 print until Lucas does a remaster)
 
2013-01-23 12:37:49 PM  

Electromax: If you are interested in remastering/restoring old movies for HD, a couple more interesting recent cases:

Restoring the Godfather
Harmy's "Despecialized" Star Wars OT (Removed the 1997 effects but remastered to extremely high quality, closest you'll get to the original 1977 print until Lucas DISNEY does a remaster)


And with Disney in charge now, I'd bet you stand a damn good chance of seeing it happen.
 
2013-01-23 12:40:30 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: Mugato: What I still don't get about downloading movies is where are the extras? Like interactive menus, making of documentaries, commentaries, things like that. I guess most people don't care about that stuff but film geeks do.

Personally, I can think of a handful of movies where the extras are worth anything at all.

/UHF: Best commentary ever.


Of all the DVDs I had, when I was digitizing them I had a little binder where I would put any bonus discs/other stuff I didn't want to rip but thought I might watch. For about 400 DVDs, the final set in the binder of "hold ons" was pretty small. The ones I can remember were:

The 3-hour documentaries about the Star Wars series and Indiana Jones series
James Cameron's fantastic commentary for Aliens and T2
The crapload of design docs from the LotR box sets

...that was about it. Most special making ofs I watch once and that's enough (and most are pretty light/predictable too, like Avengers) and most commentaries aren't worth much. Cameron is interesting to listen to though, if there are other good director ones I would be interested.

Commentaries suck that are just "hey it was really hot on this day we filmed this bit"
 
2013-01-23 12:41:25 PM  
FirstNationalBastard : Did anyone really go all out and upgrade to Blu ray, except your hardcore people who insist on having the newest toys?

At some point in my life, I quickly realized that I don't rewatch the DVDs that I owned, so I stopped buying them.

// went with HBO + a huge DVR. And then went with Netflix. I watch movies once then get rid of them.
 
2013-01-23 12:41:38 PM  

Mugato: What I still don't get about downloading movies is where are the extras? Like interactive menus, making of documentaries, commentaries, things like that. I guess most people don't care about that stuff but film geeks do.


Depends on the movie. When I rip, I grab the full soundtrack, any commentary tracks and all the subtitles that are present on the disc. I'm capable of grabbing extras or preserving the entire disc structure, but it's really not worth the hassle for stuff I may or may not care about. Anyone who is ripping movies is just as capable of doing that stuff. They generally choose not to, in order to keep data transmission costs down and preserve compatibility of their output file with the largest group of playback devices or software.
 
2013-01-23 12:41:54 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: The other problem is that most TV shows would never be worth upgrading even if they did come out on bluray, because videotaped shows would never look any better, the companies would stupidly tilt and scan their filmed shows so they filled the whole screen (because people is skeered of them mean ol' black bars on the sides of the screen), and TV on DVD is already a niche market, and going HD wouldn't make a profit for the studios.


IIRC most 35mm recordings were already wider than 16:9.. so they just same a best-fit 16:9 region of the film..
 
2013-01-23 12:42:03 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: The other problem is that most TV shows would never be worth upgrading even if they did come out on bluray, because videotaped shows would never look any better, the companies would stupidly tilt and scan their filmed shows so they filled the whole screen (because people is skeered of them mean ol' black bars on the sides of the screen), and TV on DVD is already a niche market, and going HD wouldn't make a profit for the studios.


I'm still trying to figure out why the fark Friends is getting a Blu-Ray release.

FirstNationalBastard: Personally, I can think of a handful of movies where the extras are worth anything at all.

/UHF: Best commentary ever.


I see your UHF and raise you Dr. Horrible's Sing-a-long Blog, featuring Commentary: The Musical.
 
2013-01-23 12:43:13 PM  

Electromax: FirstNationalBastard: Mugato: What I still don't get about downloading movies is where are the extras? Like interactive menus, making of documentaries, commentaries, things like that. I guess most people don't care about that stuff but film geeks do.

Personally, I can think of a handful of movies where the extras are worth anything at all.

/UHF: Best commentary ever.

Of all the DVDs I had, when I was digitizing them I had a little binder where I would put any bonus discs/other stuff I didn't want to rip but thought I might watch. For about 400 DVDs, the final set in the binder of "hold ons" was pretty small. The ones I can remember were:

The 3-hour documentaries about the Star Wars series and Indiana Jones series
James Cameron's fantastic commentary for Aliens and T2
The crapload of design docs from the LotR box sets

...that was about it. Most special making ofs I watch once and that's enough (and most are pretty light/predictable too, like Avengers) and most commentaries aren't worth much. Cameron is interesting to listen to though, if there are other good director ones I would be interested.

Commentaries suck that are just "hey it was really hot on this day we filmed this bit"


I've found that if Robert A. Harris is involved with restoring a movie and is part of the commentary track for it, the commentary will turn out to be pretty damn interesting.

Vertigo and My Fair Lady are two examples of this.
 
2013-01-23 12:50:52 PM  

StoPPeRmobile: Good sound. A decent display that's reasonably close enough for me to block out visual distractions. Clever camera work and a story well told. That's all I need.



Dude. That is awesome.
 
2013-01-23 12:53:30 PM  
Much like print.... Physical media is dead.
 
2013-01-23 12:54:53 PM  

NewWorldDan: I ripped all my DVDs to MP4 and watch them over the network. Blu-ray might be better, but not enough for me to care. And certainly not enough to pay an extra $7 per disc.


This!

I abandoned physical media by choice years ago. I buy the occasional bluray just to make sure I still financially support the media I like the most, but the discs just sit unopened on a bookshelf.

The experience is VASTLY improved. I watch everything on PC's connected to my TV's, on my gaming PC or on my android devices (thanks to Plex). Fewer commercials, on demand when I want to watch things and all organized nicely on my home fileserver. And when the new Arrested Development comes out I'll add Netflix.

You couldn't pay me to go back to physical media.
 
2013-01-23 01:02:22 PM  
I resisted buying a BR player for the sole fact that I would get sucked into buying all my DVDs in BR format. When I scored a deal on the Brave 5-disc set for $8 and The Dark Knight Rises set for $11 I set out looking for a BR player and got a refurb unit for $30. My worst fears came true and I already have 30 BRs in a span of 2 weeks.

But one thing I will say that I have 0 regrets about getting a player or any BR disc. I however refuse to pay more than $6-7 for a BR and Amazon's triple feature BR for $10 are quite amazing. Even my 70 yr old father in law who moans and groans about technology was super impressed by the playback clarity of the movies. I found a way to rip movies on my hard drive and now need to find a good way to rip them to stream on the Roku 2 XS.

I feel all giddy about 4K monitors already.
 
2013-01-23 01:11:19 PM  

roflmaonow: I found a way to rip movies on my hard drive and now need to find a good way to rip them to stream on the Roku 2 XS.


I do believe that current generation Roku boxes support talking to Plex, which runs on damned near everything. There are better tools for dealing with local content - I prefer devices that can natively play files rather than having to stream and accept transcoded audio and video, but that's your call.
 
2013-01-23 01:15:42 PM  
Tangentially, the BD remaster of Ben-Hur is pretty awesome.
 
2013-01-23 01:18:02 PM  

likefunbutnot: roflmaonow: I found a way to rip movies on my hard drive and now need to find a good way to rip them to stream on the Roku 2 XS.

I do believe that current generation Roku boxes support talking to Plex, which runs on damned near everything. There are better tools for dealing with local content - I prefer devices that can natively play files rather than having to stream and accept transcoded audio and video, but that's your call.


I LOVE Plex and so does my wife and I've made it very easy for her to just watch all our movies using it. I've managed to rip my Blu-ray movies in a couple of different formats and codecs and the results have been not bad but I understand that it can appear as close to the source and thats what I'm striving for.
 
2013-01-23 01:24:27 PM  

likefunbutnot: roflmaonow: I found a way to rip movies on my hard drive and now need to find a good way to rip them to stream on the Roku 2 XS.

I do believe that current generation Roku boxes support talking to Plex, which runs on damned near everything. There are better tools for dealing with local content - I prefer devices that can natively play files rather than having to stream and accept transcoded audio and video, but that's your call.


Got my parents a Roku HD (IIRC) for Xmas and help them set up Netflix and Plex, I can confirm this works. Plex should auto-transcode files for you that aren't natively supported.
 
hej [TotalFark]
2013-01-23 01:26:44 PM  

rpm: Silverstaff: Physical media means you maintain positive control of the entire thing, instead of leaving it up to a combination of legalities and network issues.

BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAH.

You are aware that BluRay can revoke keys and cause you to lose access, right?


It's my understanding that they can revoke the keys for the decoding devices, not the media.
 
2013-01-23 01:30:37 PM  

roflmaonow: I LOVE Plex and so does my wife and I've made it very easy for her to just watch all our movies using it. I've managed to rip my Blu-ray movies in a couple of different formats and codecs and the results have been not bad but I understand that it can appear as close to the source and thats what I'm striving for.


The problem I have with streaming media servers like that is that they tend to transcode away audio fidelity. DLNA specifies that audio is delivered in as stereo, modest bit-rate MP3. Which royally blows if you've taken the time to preserve DTS-MA and your client device is plugged in to something that's fully capable of decoding that sort of audio stream.

That's why I usually suggest that people look at using a real computer for a set-top box or at least something that has a decent CPU and set of up to date codecs, like a Popcorn Hour or Boxee player. My favorite little box is the LG Smart TV updater, which has a truly horrific user interface, but it sells for under $50 and seems to support every damned thing you throw at it. It'll speak NFS or SMB to a file server so it can open a 2560x1600 .MKV and scale it appropriately for a TV.
 
2013-01-23 01:32:07 PM  

Electromax: likefunbutnot: roflmaonow: I found a way to rip movies on my hard drive and now need to find a good way to rip them to stream on the Roku 2 XS.

I do believe that current generation Roku boxes support talking to Plex, which runs on damned near everything. There are better tools for dealing with local content - I prefer devices that can natively play files rather than having to stream and accept transcoded audio and video, but that's your call.

Got my parents a Roku HD (IIRC) for Xmas and help them set up Netflix and Plex, I can confirm this works. Plex should auto-transcode files for you that aren't natively supported.


That reminded me that Plex does transcode them on the fly and I'll see how that works out, I should clarify that I'm seeking out the best close to the source display without it being a 40 GB file. While my network should be able to handle large amounts of data streaming I'd rather use it play something with a smaller amount of data streaming if that makes any sense.
 
2013-01-23 01:36:56 PM  

roflmaonow: That reminded me that Plex does transcode them on the fly and I'll see how that works out, I should clarify that I'm seeking out the best close to the source display without it being a 40 GB file. While my network should be able to handle large amounts of data streaming I'd rather use it play something with a smaller amount of data streaming if that makes any sense.


I use a combination of AnyDVD-HD and Handbrake to transcode stuff. Depending on my interest in the material, I can get a 5GB - 15GB file as output. That's completely fine. Handbrake is incredibly script-able and supports batch operations, so it's very easy to set it and forget it.
 
2013-01-23 01:44:12 PM  
With my contacts in - I've got about 20/20 vision.

With the size of my TV 42" and the layout of my living room (~8 feet from TV to couch) the difference between DVD and Blu-ray is virtually indistinguishable. I remember buying my first blu-ray and thinking 'meh'. I had to pull the couch closer to the TV before I could appreciate a difference. A computer monitor would have been vastly better.

It turns out it's not just my imagination....
www.blogcdn.com
So, until I pick up a 70" TV - I'm good. At truthfully, if I had a 70" TV I'd probably want to be more than 8 feet away from it.
 
2013-01-23 01:44:15 PM  
I have just a couple of HD movies...

I tested and compare the difference between HD and standard DVD resolution and didn't see enough of a difference to be worth the 4x (+) larger file size, so I continued getting my stuff in regular resolution and am quite fine with it.
 
2013-01-23 01:45:13 PM  

Pope Larry II: Having gone from LPs to tapes to CDs I learned a lesson: skip a generation (or two) of media, it will save you money.

/still owns a CRT TV, no reason to by Blu-Ray.


Pony up for the LCD. The difference really is worth it. And they're cheap enough now that it isn't much of an expenditure.
 
rpm
2013-01-23 01:45:36 PM  

hej: rpm: Silverstaff: Physical media means you maintain positive control of the entire thing, instead of leaving it up to a combination of legalities and network issues.

BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAH.

You are aware that BluRay can revoke keys and cause you to lose access, right?

It's my understanding that they can revoke the keys for the decoding devices, not the media.


Then all new media uses the new key, so if you don't / can't update, hope you are satisfied with your current collection.
 
2013-01-23 01:56:59 PM  

likefunbutnot: roflmaonow: That reminded me that Plex does transcode them on the fly and I'll see how that works out, I should clarify that I'm seeking out the best close to the source display without it being a 40 GB file. While my network should be able to handle large amounts of data streaming I'd rather use it play something with a smaller amount of data streaming if that makes any sense.

I use a combination of AnyDVD-HD and Handbrake to transcode stuff. Depending on my interest in the material, I can get a 5GB - 15GB file as output. That's completely fine. Handbrake is incredibly script-able and supports batch operations, so it's very easy to set it and forget it.


Its kinda odd Handbrake for me craps out at the very end of the 2 hr transcoding process. I've tried several blu-ray rips and every single time right at the end it errors out and makes the file unplayable. This is after I rip using DVDFab which takes about 30-40 mins to rip a full BR.

I stopped using DVDFab after discovering that MakeMKV on my computer rips a full BR in 20 mins. Never could figure that out. I use the mkv file and then convert it to different formats and sizes using FormatFactory. FF might not be the best tool to do the conversion as I always ripped my DVDs using Handbrake (would take 6-8 mins) and looked as good as the original.
 
2013-01-23 02:02:59 PM  

roflmaonow: Its kinda odd Handbrake for me craps out at the very end of the 2 hr transcoding process.


I have no idea what your issue is. I can't say I've ever had Handbrake crash or cause a crash for me. I grab new nightly builds periodically. Maybe there's a bugfix that addresses whatever the hell your issue might be.
 
2013-01-23 02:03:46 PM  

likefunbutnot: roflmaonow: I LOVE Plex and so does my wife and I've made it very easy for her to just watch all our movies using it. I've managed to rip my Blu-ray movies in a couple of different formats and codecs and the results have been not bad but I understand that it can appear as close to the source and thats what I'm striving for.

The problem I have with streaming media servers like that is that they tend to transcode away audio fidelity. DLNA specifies that audio is delivered in as stereo, modest bit-rate MP3. Which royally blows if you've taken the time to preserve DTS-MA and your client device is plugged in to something that's fully capable of decoding that sort of audio stream.


Agreed, after only recently paying attention to DTS-MA, I'm floored by the difference between that and just regular stereo output. I got a very basic Sony soundbar and the sound output is vastly superior on any audio track using DTS-MA. Dolby TrueHD though is supposed to be very similar oddly sounds like a step back to my ears.
 
2013-01-23 02:22:24 PM  

Electromax: FirstNationalBastard: Mugato: What I still don't get about downloading movies is where are the extras? Like interactive menus, making of documentaries, commentaries, things like that. I guess most people don't care about that stuff but film geeks do.

Personally, I can think of a handful of movies where the extras are worth anything at all.

/UHF: Best commentary ever.

Of all the DVDs I had, when I was digitizing them I had a little binder where I would put any bonus discs/other stuff I didn't want to rip but thought I might watch. For about 400 DVDs, the final set in the binder of "hold ons" was pretty small. The ones I can remember were:

The 3-hour documentaries about the Star Wars series and Indiana Jones series
James Cameron's fantastic commentary for Aliens and T2
The crapload of design docs from the LotR box sets

...that was about it. Most special making ofs I watch once and that's enough (and most are pretty light/predictable too, like Avengers) and most commentaries aren't worth much. Cameron is interesting to listen to though, if there are other good director ones I would be interested.

Commentaries suck that are just "hey it was really hot on this day we filmed this bit"


Ron Howard's commentary on Apollo 13 is a masterclass on directing.
 
2013-01-23 02:31:36 PM  
No idea why but I love David Fincher's commentaries. I can listen to that man talk for hours and never get bored. His solo commentaries plus the ones with the cast are always fun to listen to. I'm not even a Film student but the stuff he talks sounds interesting.
 
2013-01-23 02:55:29 PM  
Where's the spec on compression? I don't care if it's 1,080,000,000,000 by 768,000,000,000 if they compress the image to huge farking blocks of crap.
 
2013-01-23 03:17:16 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: With my contacts in - I've got about 20/20 vision.

With the size of my TV 42" and the layout of my living room (~8 feet from TV to couch) the difference between DVD and Blu-ray is virtually indistinguishable. I remember buying my first blu-ray and thinking 'meh'. I had to pull the couch closer to the TV before I could appreciate a difference. A computer monitor would have been vastly better.

It turns out it's not just my imagination....
[www.blogcdn.com image 850x580]
So, until I pick up a 70" TV - I'm good. At truthfully, if I had a 70" TV I'd probably want to be more than 8 feet away from it.


And that chart is why UHD/4k in the home is utterly useless. 4k is great for movie theaters; I saw Prometheus in 4k in the theater last summer and it was one of the best-looking movies I've ever seen in a theater (despite the spectacular flaws in the script, the cinematography & production design were amazing). On those enormous screens, 1080p and 2k just isn't quite enough.

In the home though, 1080p is more than enough for almost everyone. The human eye can't even discern the full difference between 720p and 1080p unless you're unreasonably close or have an unreasonably large TV.
 
2013-01-23 03:23:10 PM  
Recently saw Zero Dark Thirty in a theater and thought that the resolution was a bit off (was expecting a 4k display) sure enough after watching the movie and digging up the specs at the theater, they had a 2k display. Glad I thought I wasn't blind and could spot the difference.

I also agree about Prometheus, the movie looks visually stunning on a 4k display albeit I saw it in 3D.
 
2013-01-23 03:27:23 PM  
FTFA: "3,840x2,048 pixels per inch resolution"

Oh really?
 
2013-01-23 04:13:44 PM  
I own only 2 movies on bluray disc... Troy, and PeeWee's Big Adventure, because i couldn't find a HD torrent of either.
 
2013-01-23 04:17:43 PM  
I have a 58" Plasma that looks amazing (had it for a little over 2 years), and most of the media we watch is 720p, which still looks fantastic.

Rarely, I'll watch "must see" movies in 1080p.

I'm not too concerned about UHD. Short of a movie theater screen, you'd be hard pressed to tell the difference, even on an 80" TV, unless you saw 1080p switched back and forth with UHD.

Between Plasmas and LEDs, it's the color definition that matters more once you get to 720p and above.
 
2013-01-23 04:18:21 PM  

darwinpolice: FTFA: "3,840x2,048 pixels per inch resolution"

Oh really?


It's only a one inch display.
 
2013-01-23 05:02:19 PM  

Mugato: I don't understand how you can get all the extras on a film that you download


Its rare but Netflix streaming does have extras.  I think I've seen it only once (I generally watch only documentaries and music... just not a movie buff).  I believe it was a Jethro Tull concert DVD I streamed.

I'm sure in the future they'll find a way to do it more often.
 
2013-01-23 05:04:03 PM  

roflmaonow: No idea why but I love David Fincher's commentaries. I can listen to that man talk for hours and never get bored. His solo commentaries plus the ones with the cast are always fun to listen to. I'm not even a Film student but the stuff he talks sounds interesting.


Speaking of Fincher, the Fight Club commentary with Ed Norton and Brad Pitt was great. There was also a pretty cool segment on the CGI in the film. And apparently the "YOUR dildo" guy is a good friend of all of them.
 
2013-01-23 05:13:52 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: Did anyone really go all out and upgrade to Blu ray, except your hardcore people who insist on having the newest toys?

They hardly released anything beyond new films in the format. It's already pretty much leveled off.

Regular DVD is still the go-to format for now. Eventually, it'll all be Downloads. But blu is nothing more than the new Millennium's laser disc.


I got a blu-ray player a couple years ago...but it was basically a perfect storm of things coming together.

1. They were on sale for like $100-$120 and only marginally more expensive than a decent DVD player.
2. It was a Christmas gift
3. I had recently got netflix and blu-ray players had started adding in the ability to watch netflix from the dvd player
4. wife wanted a DVD player for the second TV, so we needed another DVD player anyway
5. I was (and still am) in the process of creating a home theater/"man cave"...Figued I might as add a blueray player.

So, run out to buy one? No. but I did get one. And I am happy with it.
 
2013-01-23 05:40:37 PM  

Mugato: roflmaonow: No idea why but I love David Fincher's commentaries. I can listen to that man talk for hours and never get bored. His solo commentaries plus the ones with the cast are always fun to listen to. I'm not even a Film student but the stuff he talks sounds interesting.

Speaking of Fincher, the Fight Club commentary with Ed Norton and Brad Pitt was great. There was also a pretty cool segment on the CGI in the film. And apparently the "YOUR dildo" guy is a good friend of all of them.


I'm a huge Fincher fan, I have all his movies except The Game on special edition DVDs. I've watched all the extras and commentaries on them all, I think the Fight Club commentary is probably the best one though the one in Seven is excellent as well.
 
2013-01-23 06:04:29 PM  
The only stuff that I actually ripped VIDEO_TS folders of the disc structure rather than converting the main video to mp4 and leaving the rest, was all 9 seasons of Seinfeld. Took a while too, I used a program called BDLot to rip the discs and DVD Shrink to compress them, it was like ~3.5 GB per disc. We watch the show often enough (still) that I miss the Notes about Nothing subtitle track without it, which is sort of a trivia thing and pretty interesting. Never really checked out many of the special features though, except for the 5 minute bits about the classic episodes.

I'll have to check out Apollo 13. I think the only Fincher movies I have are Alien 3 (also probably has a commentary, it's from the same packaging as Aliens and Alien which had Cameron and Scott) and Seven, not a big fan of the latter or Fight Club but I'll have to check out Alien 3 for it later. I'll watch those movies with any excuse.
 
2013-01-23 06:23:40 PM  
Unless your home has infinite space, filling it with plastic discs isn't desirable.

Streaming or GTFO.
 
2013-01-23 06:39:00 PM  

Electromax:
I think the only Fincher movies I have are Alien 3 (also probably has a commentary, it's from the same packaging as Aliens and Alien which had Cameron and Scott) and Seven, not a big fan of the latter or Fight Club but I'll have to check out Alien 3 for it later. I'll watch those movies with any excuse.


From what I gather Fincher didn't do a commentary for that movie, I think he still disowns it as his creation even the 'assembled cut'. The first two are amazing movies which I too can watch anytime. The 3rd one isn't bad, the 4th one is atrocious.
 
2013-01-23 06:43:27 PM  

MrEricSir: Unless your home has infinite space, filling it with plastic discs isn't desirable.

Streaming or GTFO.


fark streaming.

Give me downloads... DRM-Free downloads I can store wherever I please.
 
2013-01-23 06:51:59 PM  
I remember Ghostbusters having a pretty good commentary. The original release of the DVD even had a MST3k-style silhouette for it.
 
2013-01-23 08:13:19 PM  
There is a lot of FUD and misinformation in this thread.

First off, resolution is really all about perceived resolution quality. 1080p looks as good at 20' as DVD does at 10' assuming the same size screen.

Second, all 4K/UHD adds is the ability to fill more of your vision at the same sharpness. Right now a BluRay is at maximum detail and sharpness when it takes up 32 degrees of your vision horizontally. That could be a 30" screen at 4', a 60" screen at 8', or 120" screen at 16'. They will look about the same. UHD/4K will allow you to experience the same quality, but occupy 64 degrees of your field of vision doing it. It can provide a true theater experience if you sit close.
 
2013-01-23 08:19:40 PM  

jimb213: In the home though, 1080p is more than enough for almost everyone. The human eye can't even discern the full difference between 720p and 1080p unless you're unreasonably close or have an unreasonably large TV.


If you go by calculators for these things, the viewing distance to have a 16:9 screen occupy 30 degrees of your view is always just a smidge beyond the distance that 20/20 vision can fully resolve 1920x1080. (Example: with a 50-inch screen, you have a 30-degree viewing angle from 6.8 feet, and the distance beyond which a 50-inch 1080i screen is sharper than your vision is 6.5 feet.)
 
2013-01-23 09:01:26 PM  
Skipped blu-ray. Maybe next format.
 
2013-01-23 09:13:18 PM  
All digital. Streamed is good, downloaded is good too.

I see no reason to buy any type of physical media format.
 
2013-01-23 09:23:45 PM  

Nem Wan: jimb213: In the home though, 1080p is more than enough for almost everyone. The human eye can't even discern the full difference between 720p and 1080p unless you're unreasonably close or have an unreasonably large TV.

If you go by calculators for these things, the viewing distance to have a 16:9 screen occupy 30 degrees of your view is always just a smidge beyond the distance that 20/20 vision can fully resolve 1920x1080. (Example: with a 50-inch screen, you have a 30-degree viewing angle from 6.8 feet, and the distance beyond which a 50-inch 1080i screen is sharper than your vision is 6.5 feet.)


Yep, and I find that to be totally fine for most viewing. Now if you want a more immersive experience (45+ degrees) you will want 4K to also enjoy the same pixel-free quality.

There is also something to be said about being able to buy a copy of a movie that is master-quality in both audio and video. It literally won't ever get any better. So you could safely buy your collection at 4K and never need to upgrade again (unless you want 3D or bonus features). There may be higher resolution video shot in the future, but then you have to extend the viewing angle out past 65 degrees to see that detail - which starts getting uncomfortable. For most movie theaters, 1/3 of the way back is around 50 degrees - which for me is the sweet-spot.
 
2013-01-23 09:30:50 PM  

Mugato: What I still don't get about downloading movies is where are the extras? Like interactive menus, making of documentaries, commentaries, things like that. I guess most people don't care about that stuff but film geeks do.


google --- "downloade movie name" + "making of" +documetary +"film geek shiat"
 
2013-01-23 09:32:01 PM  
Know how I know who didn't read the article? Everyone arguing for streaming. From the article:

"The average household has 6 megabits of bandwidth. Blu-ray is 48 megabits for its stream [off the disc in the player], and that's half of what 4k video would require. It's impractical to believe you will be able stream that kind of content any time soon," he said.
 
2013-01-24 12:08:20 AM  

FirstNationalBastard: MrEricSir: Unless your home has infinite space, filling it with plastic discs isn't desirable.

Streaming or GTFO.

fark streaming.

Give me downloads... DRM-Free downloads I can store wherever I please.


Downloads have to be stored. They have to be cataloged. They have to be backed up. You've gotta have a machine to serve them. You've gotta set all that shiat up, which, unless you get damn lucky, are willing to simply buy finished solutions at a premium, or don't mind putting up with a fairly miserable and unfriendly-to-non-geeks system is guaranteed to be a pain in the ass.

I'm slowly getting sick of keeping up with it all. Digital baggage is getting as bad as the physical kind. I've begun to weigh all that time, effort, and money (mostly time and effort) against streaming and maybe just ordering shiat from the farking library sometimes, and beginning to think I've suckered myself in to wast a whole fark-ton of my time for very, very little benefit.

Popping in a disc from a small collection, paying for Netflix or the occasional Redbox flick, and hitting the library on the way home from work are pretty minor inconveniences compared with the relief of never worrying about that crap ever again.

/ Seriously considering ditching modern gaming, too, and spending the next decade or so just catching up on classics that I missed the first time around.
// The tech rat race can fark off.
/// Oh god, am I becoming a hipster?
/\ Or just old...
 
2013-01-24 01:00:52 AM  
I can't wait for the Digitally Remastered from original VHS edition of "Taped Karate Match."
 
2013-01-24 03:08:39 AM  
I replaced my VHS with DVD's over the years, but I have no plans to upgrade to Blu-ray. I'm simply not that picky about the picture quality. When I buy a new DVD now, if I can get it in Blu-ray for the same price or a buck or two more, I'll buy it, other wise I just get the regular DVD. Of the 1000 or so DVD's I have, I only have a handful of Blu-ray.
 
2013-01-24 09:30:56 AM  

fallingcow: FirstNationalBastard: MrEricSir: Unless your home has infinite space, filling it with plastic discs isn't desirable.

Streaming or GTFO.

fark streaming.

Give me downloads... DRM-Free downloads I can store wherever I please.

Downloads have to be stored. They have to be cataloged. They have to be backed up. You've gotta have a machine to serve them. You've gotta set all that shiat up, which, unless you get damn lucky, are willing to simply buy finished solutions at a premium, or don't mind putting up with a fairly miserable and unfriendly-to-non-geeks system is guaranteed to be a pain in the ass.

I'm slowly getting sick of keeping up with it all. Digital baggage is getting as bad as the physical kind. I've begun to weigh all that time, effort, and money (mostly time and effort) against streaming and maybe just ordering shiat from the farking library sometimes, and beginning to think I've suckered myself in to wast a whole fark-ton of my time for very, very little benefit.

Popping in a disc from a small collection, paying for Netflix or the occasional Redbox flick, and hitting the library on the way home from work are pretty minor inconveniences compared with the relief of never worrying about that crap ever again.

/ Seriously considering ditching modern gaming, too, and spending the next decade or so just catching up on classics that I missed the first time around.
// The tech rat race can fark off.
/// Oh god, am I becoming a hipster?
/\ Or just old...


hmm..

My system is a >32TB (including backups)... I download from the sites that I buy my movies and TV shows from, I get the meta-data for them, and put them in a movies folder and Media Browser (patch for Media Center) is configured properly, so the software does everything else.

I fail to see where this impossible hardship is for you...

Advantages: no delays, no need to worry about bandwidth or servers going doing, nice clean library (with multiple drive boxes), etc. Can rewatch the favourite stuff... I can watch something one day, someone else can watch it another, and n waste in bandwidth or such... I know what the quality is, can transfer to portable devices, etc.

Considering that the cost of my system was about a year's worth of when I used to have satellite.. might seem expensive at first, but 2-3 years later... it easily paid for itself.

And then considering that I have about 2 thousand DVD (that I've ripped to my system) that are on shelves in my office, which while looks kinda nice, most have not been touched in years, since the system is up... once in a blue-moon one of the kids will grab one to watch in their bedrooms, but overall, that doesn't happen often. (the kids inherited the old tube TVs and the DVD players)
 
2013-01-24 12:04:25 PM  

UsikFark: I can't wait for the Digitally Remastered from original VHS edition of "Taped Karate Match."


If you're bored sometime, go to a torrent site like the pirate bay and look up "VHS" in the video section. Once you get past probably a bunch of copies of that recent horror movie, there's some pretty funny gems buried down there. 80s workout tapes, kung fu training materials, random merchandise tapes and obscure film rips. It's like the digital equivalent of grandma's yard sale.
 
2013-01-24 12:48:06 PM  

Electromax: grandma's yard sale


I don't want to see that porno, no matter what the format. You're sick, man.
 
2013-01-24 02:33:43 PM  

illegal.tender: NewWorldDan: I ripped all my DVDs to MP4 and watch them over the network. Blu-ray might be better, but not enough for me to care. And certainly not enough to pay an extra $7 per disc.

This.

Added bonus: not having to wade through bullshiat "preview of upcoming attractions", FBI warnings, dumbass menu flourishes, and other retarded crap the entertainment industry tries to shove down our throats.


i.imgur.com">
 
2013-01-24 08:56:40 PM  

MrEricSir: Unless your home has infinite space, filling it with plastic discs isn't desirable.

Streaming or GTFO.


Streaming is great and all, but it's shiat compared to a blu-ray in visual quality and until we can reliable stream very high data rates it will most likely stay that way.
 
2013-01-25 09:16:18 AM  

AgentKGB: illegal.tender: NewWorldDan: I ripped all my DVDs to MP4 and watch them over the network. Blu-ray might be better, but not enough for me to care. And certainly not enough to pay an extra $7 per disc.

This.

Added bonus: not having to wade through bullshiat "preview of upcoming attractions", FBI warnings, dumbass menu flourishes, and other retarded crap the entertainment industry tries to shove down our throats.

[i.imgur.com image 700x722]">


All of that is skippable with Blu Ray. Just sayin.
 
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