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(Reuters)   Scary: fire closes tunnel in Norway. Tasty: cheese fire   (mobile.reuters.com) divider line 66
    More: Weird, Norway, Svalbard  
•       •       •

4548 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Jan 2013 at 1:37 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-22 01:12:23 PM  
The thing about burning cheese is that even though you know it will stick to the roof of your mouth as it continues to burn, you can't stop shoveling it in.

It's like delicious napalm.

In medieval days they used to pour huge molten vats of scalding fondue over the sides of the castle as a form of defense. Those storming the walls couldn't help themselves but throw themselves into the delicious but deadly goo. Casualties were greatly reduced after armies figured out they could arm themselves with croutons and long forked sticks.
 
2013-01-22 01:23:07 PM  
We're gonna need a whole shiatload of fondue forks
 
2013-01-22 01:40:02 PM  
Just toss in several bags of tostitos and you have nachos.
 
2013-01-22 01:44:36 PM  
Ohhh, the Oltermanni!!!
 
2013-01-22 01:46:38 PM  
I can't think of a funny fondue joke. :(
 
2013-01-22 01:47:36 PM  

brap: The thing about burning cheese is that even though you know it will stick to the roof of your mouth as it continues to burn, you can't stop shoveling it in.

It's like delicious napalm.

In medieval days they used to pour huge molten vats of scalding fondue over the sides of the castle as a form of defense. Those storming the walls couldn't help themselves but throw themselves into the delicious but deadly goo. Casualties were greatly reduced after armies figured out they could arm themselves with croutons and long forked sticks.



pseamus.smugmug.com
 
2013-01-22 01:48:00 PM  
Brunost = brown cheese. Must be one of those EU truth in advertising conventions. I wonder if they're going to require a warning stamp on every wheel.

Should be marketed under the "Incinerator" appellation. I wonder what beer I should have with it?
 
2013-01-22 01:48:35 PM  

Grapple: I can't think of a funny fondue joke. :(


You're done. Stick a fork in you.
 
2013-01-22 01:50:16 PM  
i1247.photobucket.com

Knows nothing about it........
 
2013-01-22 01:54:25 PM  
I've had brunost before...I thought it tasted like ass, but all the Norwegians I knew loved it, so maybe this is a national thing.
 
2013-01-22 01:55:28 PM  
Did a quick GIS for "burning cheese" and found this.  It has nothing to do the article but I'm gonna post it anyway.

media.gamerevolution.com
 
2013-01-22 01:55:55 PM  
Has anyone told a fondue joke yet?


...dammit.
 
2013-01-22 01:56:57 PM  
They still talk about the Great Lutefisk Fire of 1876.
 
2013-01-22 01:59:44 PM  
Someone switched brunost with burnost.
 
2013-01-22 02:00:00 PM  

brap: The thing about burning cheese is that even though you know it will stick to the roof of your mouth as it continues to burn, you can't stop shoveling it in.

It's like delicious napalm.

In medieval days they used to pour huge molten vats of scalding fondue over the sides of the castle as a form of defense. Those storming the walls couldn't help themselves but throw themselves into the delicious but deadly goo. Casualties were greatly reduced after armies figured out they could arm themselves with croutons and long forked sticks.


Yes, but cheese warfare escalated to the creation terrible weapons. During WW1, the Germans developed Mustard Gas to smell like cheese, so unwary troops were drawn to the smell, only to be caught in gunfire, not to mention the effects of mustard gas. This is why the royal army supplied troops with gas masks, cheese rations, and later on, mustard gas was issued as an cruel weapon.
 
2013-01-22 02:00:37 PM  
Mmm, fondue.
 
2013-01-22 02:02:18 PM  

Galloping Galoshes: Brunost = brown cheese. Must be one of those EU truth in advertising conventions.


The truth is that we Norwegians don't bother with a fancy name if a simple description would do. Brunost is brown and cheesy, so why come up with a fancy name? Granted, the variations with more than 50% goats milk in them are sometimes more properly called geitost (no, no points for guessing what that means) but that is still just a subset of brown cheese - which isn't a proper cheese at all, technically speaking.

Very tasty though - but definitely an acquired taste that a lot of foreigners never acquire.

Tastes great on bread with strawberry jam, nugatti or salami... yes, we're kinda weird up here in the frozen wastelands.
 
2013-01-22 02:05:48 PM  

WegianWarrior: Galloping Galoshes: Brunost = brown cheese. Must be one of those EU truth in advertising conventions.

The truth is that we Norwegians don't bother with a fancy name if a simple description would do. Brunost is brown and cheesy, so why come up with a fancy name? Granted, the variations with more than 50% goats milk in them are sometimes more properly called geitost (no, no points for guessing what that means) but that is still just a subset of brown cheese - which isn't a proper cheese at all, technically speaking.

Very tasty though - but definitely an acquired taste that a lot of foreigners never acquire.

Tastes great on bread with strawberry jam, nugatti or salami... yes, we're kinda weird up here in the frozen wastelands.


I heard goatse was totally something else.
 
2013-01-22 02:07:11 PM  
Killick? Killick, there?
 
2013-01-22 02:10:45 PM  

WegianWarrior: Very tasty though - but definitely an acquired taste that a lot of foreigners never acquire.


We have things like that here, especially root beer. To the British, root beer smells a lot like a germicidal ointment (Germolene). My English brother-in-law can't stand it.
 
2013-01-22 02:13:10 PM  
Smoked Gouda?

Nah, got nuthin.
 
2013-01-22 02:14:21 PM  
Flaming Brown Cheese is the name of my Euro-style speed metal band.
 
2013-01-22 02:17:33 PM  
why do i have the urge for a craptastic little caesars pizza?
 
2013-01-22 02:17:34 PM  
FTE: "...flaming brown cheese..."

Band name?
STD symptom?

Why do those three words together make me giggle so?
 
2013-01-22 02:18:25 PM  
Doesn't sound as bad as a burning truckload of margarine:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mont_Blanc_Tunnel
 
2013-01-22 02:19:47 PM  
Opa!

/I got nothin'.
 
2013-01-22 02:19:49 PM  
Man - I had some cheese burning in the ol' tunnel this morning, yadda-yadda-yadda...
 
2013-01-22 02:19:56 PM  

brap: The thing about burning cheese is that even though you know it will stick to the roof of your mouth as it continues to burn, you can't stop shoveling it in.

It's like delicious napalm.

In medieval days they used to pour huge molten vats of scalding fondue over the sides of the castle as a form of defense. Those storming the walls couldn't help themselves but throw themselves into the delicious but deadly goo. Casualties were greatly reduced after armies figured out they could arm themselves with croutons and long forked sticks.


Fun fact: the word "castle" is derived from the Latin word for cheese, "caseus", because of this defensive tactic.
 
2013-01-22 02:23:45 PM  
Could have been worse...

t2.gstatic.com
 
2013-01-22 02:24:28 PM  
Interestingly, one of the hottest fires on earth was The 1999 Mont Blanc tunnel fire (1,832 °F). It was fueled by a semi carrying margarine:
tunneltalk.com
The temperatures were hot enough to melt the car & truck frames into the concrete.
 
2013-01-22 02:25:08 PM  

brap: In medieval days they used to pour huge molten vats of scalding fondue over the sides of the castle as a form of defense. Those storming the walls couldn't help themselves but throw themselves into the delicious but deadly goo. Casualties were greatly reduced after armies figured out they could arm themselves with croutons and long forked sticks.


This is also the true origin of the phrase, "Torches and Pitchforks." The torches were the forks with croutons covered in burning-hot goo; the pitchforks were the forks that had their croutons consumed otherwise removed. As both were inedible (at least until the cheese had adequately cooled), this led to the invading armies becoming angry mobs. As this anger was typically directed at the land-owners who built the fortifications, over time historians confused the phrase with popular uprising.
 
2013-01-22 02:25:47 PM  

WegianWarrior: Galloping Galoshes:
Very tasty though - but definitely an acquired taste that a lot of foreigners never acquire.


A lot do though. I always take a kilo of brunost and 3 kilos of salmon back for my grandmother when I go see my family twice a year. Also send some once a year via my sister. My family loves it.
 
2013-01-22 02:27:39 PM  
It's funny that we don't have any other reports, like from TheLocal.no that might include pictures from the incident.

For all I know this article is fake. For all I know most of the articles are fake.
 
2013-01-22 02:28:05 PM  
GRILLED CHEESE PORN THREAD!!!

chicago.seriouseats.com

aht.seriouseats.com

i.imgur.com
 
2013-01-22 02:31:43 PM  
Iron chef ingredient: Norweigens
 
2013-01-22 02:34:21 PM  

WegianWarrior: Galloping Galoshes: Brunost = brown cheese. Must be one of those EU truth in advertising conventions.

The truth is that we Norwegians don't bother with a fancy name if a simple description would do. Brunost is brown and cheesy, so why come up with a fancy name? Granted, the variations with more than 50% goats milk in them are sometimes more properly called geitost (no, no points for guessing what that means) but that is still just a subset of brown cheese - which isn't a proper cheese at all, technically speaking.

Very tasty though - but definitely an acquired taste that a lot of foreigners never acquire.

Tastes great on bread with strawberry jam, nugatti or salami... yes, we're kinda weird up here in the frozen wastelands.


From the wiki link:

Brunost is made by boiling a mixture of milk, cream and whey carefully for several hours so that the water evaporates. The heat turns the milk sugar into caramel which gives the cheese its characteristic colour and taste.

Caramel cheese? Blech, I'll pass. And this is coming from someone who tried Marmite on a whim.
 
2013-01-22 02:38:13 PM  

WegianWarrior: Galloping Galoshes: Brunost = brown cheese. Must be one of those EU truth in advertising conventions.

The truth is that we Norwegians don't bother with a fancy name if a simple description would do. Brunost is brown and cheesy, so why come up with a fancy name? Granted, the variations with more than 50% goats milk in them are sometimes more properly called geitost (no, no points for guessing what that means) but that is still just a subset of brown cheese - which isn't a proper cheese at all, technically speaking.

Very tasty though - but definitely an acquired taste that a lot of foreigners never acquire.

Tastes great on bread with strawberry jam, nugatti or salami... yes, we're kinda weird up here in the frozen wastelands.


It is definitely an acquired taste, but I've learned to love it. My first Friday (aka waffle day) on the job my coworkers insisted I had to try this stuff. Not knowing any better, I made a brunost, hvitost, and salami sandwich. You should have seen the looks I got. I eventually figured out to slather butter, strawberry jam, and brunøst on a waffle and maaaaaaaaaaan, it's tasty.

/still won't get me to touch that shrimp in beet juice and mayonaise crap, though
//or the mackerel in tomato sauce
///or the rotfisk
////Norwegians eat some damn weird stuff!
 
2013-01-22 02:48:17 PM  
Ugh! Gietost! Brown cakey cheese. Gram was always trying to get us to eat it. Tried it once and that was enough. I'm surprised it burns. Figured you could caulk a boat hull with it.
 
2013-01-22 02:49:27 PM  

brap: The thing about burning cheese is that even though you know it will stick to the roof of your mouth as it continues to burn, you can't stop shoveling it in.

It's like delicious napalm.

In medieval days they used to pour huge molten vats of scalding fondue over the sides of the castle as a form of defense. Those storming the walls couldn't help themselves but throw themselves into the delicious but deadly goo. Casualties were greatly reduced after armies figured out they could arm themselves with croutons and long forked sticks.


This, this right here is why I treasure Farkers. I learn more here than I ever learned in college. Here and watching South Park. Life is good.
 
2013-01-22 02:54:41 PM  

blatz514: Could have been worse...

[t2.gstatic.com image 256x192]


Please post links to images like that, with a warning, instead of posting the images themselves.
 
2013-01-22 02:57:01 PM  

Ed_Severson: Opa!

/I got nothin'.


See, I thought it would be obvious to go this way, instead of the fondue path...

/Mmmm, flaming Greek cheese...
 
2013-01-22 03:00:32 PM  

BigNumber12: blatz514: Could have been worse...

[t2.gstatic.com image 256x192]

Please post links to images like that, with a warning, instead of posting the images themselves.


You freaked me out for just a bit.  I forgot what I had posted in this thread.
 
2013-01-22 03:20:01 PM  

Fubegra: WegianWarrior: Very tasty though - but definitely an acquired taste that a lot of foreigners never acquire.

We have things like that here, especially root beer. To the British, root beer smells a lot like a germicidal ointment (Germolene). My English brother-in-law can't stand it.


My wife from SE Asia thinks the same thing about root beer. "Yuck, medicine!"
 
2013-01-22 03:23:08 PM  

CygnusDarius: brap: The thing about burning cheese is that even though you know it will stick to the roof of your mouth as it continues to burn, you can't stop shoveling it in.

It's like delicious napalm.

In medieval days they used to pour huge molten vats of scalding fondue over the sides of the castle as a form of defense. Those storming the walls couldn't help themselves but throw themselves into the delicious but deadly goo. Casualties were greatly reduced after armies figured out they could arm themselves with croutons and long forked sticks.

Yes, but cheese warfare escalated to the creation terrible weapons. During WW1, the Germans developed Mustard Gas to smell like cheese, so unwary troops were drawn to the smell, only to be caught in gunfire, not to mention the effects of mustard gas. This is why the royal army supplied troops with gas masks, cheese rations, and later on, mustard gas was issued as an cruel weapon.


The french contered by inventing cheese with truly fetid smells when properly aged and heated. This led to the eventual defeat of the Germans in WW1.
 
2013-01-22 03:28:29 PM  

Silent But Deadly: Fubegra: WegianWarrior: Very tasty though - but definitely an acquired taste that a lot of foreigners never acquire.

We have things like that here, especially root beer. To the British, root beer smells a lot like a germicidal ointment (Germolene). My English brother-in-law can't stand it.

My wife from SE Asia thinks the same thing about root beer. "Yuck, medicine!"


Leaving this here and slinking away.
 
2013-01-22 03:30:39 PM  

turbocucumber: The french contered by inventing cheese with truly fetid smells when properly aged and heated. This led to the eventual defeat of the Germans in WW1.


I once thought to bring home some French cheeses, even a couple smelly ones, figuring that since my mom was a big fan of Limburger cheese it would be fine. We had to throw away the carry-on bag - couldn't get the reek out of it.

/not sure Mom actually ate all that cheese anyway
 
2013-01-22 03:35:35 PM  

cgraves67: Has anyone told a fondue joke yet?


Not too late for a Raclette joke.
 
2013-01-22 03:38:23 PM  
Ah the power of cheese.
 
2013-01-22 03:45:03 PM  
Too much cheese closes my tunnel too.
 
2013-01-22 04:09:17 PM  
"So it caught on fire, 1000 degrees , Norwegian cheese."
upload.wikimedia.org
 
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