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(Slate)   Google treats employees well, and in return, they work hard. Who knew it could be like that?   (slate.com ) divider line
    More: Obvious, Google Offers, Economic sector, middle management, maternity leave, attrition rates  
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3569 clicks; posted to Business » on 22 Jan 2013 at 11:00 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-22 11:07:40 AM  
No, Google is able to recruit already hard workers because they treat their employees well.

I find it unlikely that many companies would be able to duplicate their success simply by pouringthese types of luxuries on their existing employees. Not to say a lot of places don't have a lot of room for improvement and that better working environments and benefits wouldn't pay dividends in many places, but, let's face it. Google wants elite employees so it offers the elite perks required to attract and retain them.

Most of us ain't elite employees, though and that's why we're not getting those perks.
 
2013-01-22 11:08:16 AM  
I worked at Google a few years ago at the Boulder & Thornton offices.

Three meals a day, free drinks & snacks, climb walls, pool, video games, best tech hardware I've seen, and beer & wing Fridays were always a hit. They sent me out to Mountain View, CA for training as a "Noogler" the first week. It's like an adult Disney World...
 
2013-01-22 11:08:26 AM  
I've always thought it ridiculous when interviewer's ask the candidate "So why do you want to work here?" Like Joe's Accounting is some fantastic work wonderland paragon and every project makes the world a better place.

Maybe they just want to hear someone fellate their sense of self worth that they are a manager at said company.

The honest answer is:

"Because Google/Apple/Funtime Toy Co.'s not hiring people with my skill-set, you dumb shiat"

Very few companies attain levels of popularity or influence where people looking for jobs, stop and think "You know, I'd REALLY like to work at xyz. From what I've heard they'd be fantastic employers."

This is not an accident. It turns out it's very profitable to be an excellent employer, but it's very unprofitable to try hard but fail to be an excellent employer.
 
2013-01-22 11:21:16 AM  
That plus they learned that you can get 18 hours a day, 7 days a week out of someone for at least a few years before they go crazy and murder themselves by tricking them into thinking that living at the office is a "benefit"
 
2013-01-22 11:27:51 AM  

Lost Thought 00: That plus they learned that you can get 18 hours a day, 7 days a week out of someone for at least a few years before they go crazy and murder themselves by tricking them into thinking that living at the office is a "benefit"


Isn't that still better than expecting the same amount of work for the price of "You're lucky to have a job!"
 
2013-01-22 11:46:38 AM  

Vegan Meat Popsicle: No, Google is able to recruit already hard workers because they treat their employees well.

I find it unlikely that many companies would be able to duplicate their success simply by pouringthese types of luxuries on their existing employees. Not to say a lot of places don't have a lot of room for improvement and that better working environments and benefits wouldn't pay dividends in many places, but, let's face it. Google wants elite employees so it offers the elite perks required to attract and retain them.

Most of us ain't elite employees, though and that's why we're not getting those perks.


Pretty much nailed it. Google hires the best and has extremely high performance expectations, and the compensation reflects that.
 
2013-01-22 11:51:45 AM  
When I finished college in '07, several people in my family said "you know, you should get a job at Google/Pentagon/NOAA/NGIS"

Yeah, like it's that easy. I'd probably be lucky to even get an automated rejection from them.
 
2013-01-22 11:53:07 AM  

guilt by association: NGIS


Argh... I meant the NGA.
 
2013-01-22 11:53:48 AM  

Lost Thought 00: That plus they learned that you can get 18 hours a day, 7 days a week out of someone for at least a few years before they go crazy and murder themselves by tricking them into thinking that living at the office is a "benefit"


I don't know how people do that. don't they have lives? I begrudge every second of my life that isn't spent doing exactly what I want. I only get one shot at this thing,

no one wishes for more office time on their deathbed.
 
2013-01-22 11:57:46 AM  

hungryhungryhorus: I've always thought it ridiculous when interviewer's ask the candidate "So why do you want to work here?" Like Joe's Accounting is some fantastic work wonderland paragon and every project makes the world a better place.

Maybe they just want to hear someone fellate their sense of self worth that they are a manager at said company.


Or maybe they are looking to see if you are willing to take the minimal effort necessary to do a google search for Joe's Accounting, find something about it that you like, and say that.
 
2013-01-22 11:59:41 AM  

Lost Thought 00: That plus they learned that you can get 18 hours a day, 7 days a week out of someone for at least a few years before they go crazy and murder themselves by tricking them into thinking that living at the office is a "benefit"


this.

I know some people at Google, and the 'free 3-meals a day' thing is really saying "gee, you know, you can work here all day! no need to go home!"
 
2013-01-22 12:00:51 PM  

guilt by association: When I finished college in '07, several people in my family said "you know, you should get a job at Google/Pentagon/NOAA/NGIS"

Yeah, like it's that easy. I'd probably be lucky to even get an automated rejection from them.


You don't want to work at the Pentagon. That's where souls go to die. Same with NGA, NSA, CIA, NRO, etc.
 
2013-01-22 12:00:51 PM  
how the fark do the big 4 firms keep landing on this list?

corporate sweatshops, all of them (deloitte is by far the worst, but ranked highest....hmmmm).

those salaries look great, but when you look at the number of hours worked its not much better than retail, and worse than office temp work.

absolutely no job security, and employee turnover runs at very high rates (20% or more).
 
2013-01-22 12:03:15 PM  

SuperT: Lost Thought 00: That plus they learned that you can get 18 hours a day, 7 days a week out of someone for at least a few years before they go crazy and murder themselves by tricking them into thinking that living at the office is a "benefit"

I don't know how people do that. don't they have lives? I begrudge every second of my life that isn't spent doing exactly what I want. I only get one shot at this thing,

no one wishes for more office time on their deathbed.


Abe Lincoln maybe?
 
2013-01-22 12:03:34 PM  

Vegan Meat Popsicle: No, Google is able to recruit already hard workers because they treat their employees well.

I find it unlikely that many companies would be able to duplicate their success simply by pouringthese types of luxuries on their existing employees. Not to say a lot of places don't have a lot of room for improvement and that better working environments and benefits wouldn't pay dividends in many places, but, let's face it. Google wants elite employees so it offers the elite perks required to attract and retain them.

Most of us ain't elite employees, though and that's why we're not getting those perks.


BS.

My SO is definitely not an 'elite' employee, but he's working for a business that treats him ridiculously well.  And in return, he a) works like crazy and constantly is thinking about how to improve his skills faster and b) he actually enjoys his work, and doesn't plan on leaving for the near future. 

They do paid training for his specific job and other general knowledge training, he gets full benefits (medical, dental, life) at 90 days and then some (they comp part of the cost for massages, bus passes, you can apply for scholarships to return to school, paid jury duty, free or crazy comped food while working)... and that's just what I remember off the top of my head.

It's the first job he's had where they honestly treat employees damn well.  And somehow, even with all those benefits my SO gets for a somewhat skilled job (although they are *teaching* him those skills), they make a pretty damn big profit and do a crazy amount of business.  Funny how that works.
 
2013-01-22 12:06:01 PM  

Vegan Meat Popsicle: No, Google is able to recruit already hard workers because they treat their employees well. I find it unlikely that many companies would be able to duplicate their success simply by pouring these types of luxuries on their existing employees. Not to say a lot of places don't have a lot of room for improvement and that better working environments and benefits wouldn't pay dividends in many places, but, let's face it. Google wants elite employees so it offers the elite perks required to attract and retain them. Most of us ain't elite employees, though and that's why we're not getting those perks.


This x eleventy brazillion. I don't work for Google, but I do work for a company that starts by hiring the elite and compensates accordingly to retain them. In the transition to my new gig I went from bilingual engineering to. . . phone tech support. I thought I was hot shiat until I was assigned a mentor who speaks four languages. Anyway, our team works largely unsupervised for two reasons:
1) We're all inherently professional workers who don't need to be babysat to get shiat done, and
2) The company doesn't dick us in ways like work-life balance to crush our self-motivation.

The importance of #2 can't be emphasized enough, but #2 is only meaningful if you have #1 to start with. My last job was supporting a set of remote sales offices; these guys were impossible to supervise. But, they weren't elite; half of them were effin' useless. As a result, almost half our workload was a bad, endless deleted scene from "Office Space" where we submitted stacks of reports that reassured HQ we were actually working, which sucked balls if you were the sort of employee that actually tried to get shiat done. As much as I hated it, I doubt a dramatic change in company policy would've gotten any extra productivity out of those guys.
 
2013-01-22 12:07:24 PM  

LemSkroob: Lost Thought 00: That plus they learned that you can get 18 hours a day, 7 days a week out of someone for at least a few years before they go crazy and murder themselves by tricking them into thinking that living at the office is a "benefit"

this.

I know some people at Google, and the 'free 3-meals a day' thing is really saying "gee, you know, you can work here all day! no need to go home!"


Better than a lot of companies that expect you to put in those type of hours without the free meals and try to do everything possible to get out of properly compensating you for working those hours.
 
2013-01-22 12:09:15 PM  

Lost Thought 00: That plus they learned that you can get 18 hours a day, 7 days a week out of someone for at least a few years before they go crazy and murder themselves by tricking them into thinking that living at the office is a "benefit"


That why (if I had the necessary skill level) I don't think I would ever be able to take a job at Google and similar firms even if I had a chance. I tend to value my family a bit more than any project I might be working on.
 
2013-01-22 12:09:51 PM  

dragonchild: Vegan Meat Popsicle: No, Google is able to recruit already hard workers because they treat their employees well. I find it unlikely that many companies would be able to duplicate their success simply by pouring these types of luxuries on their existing employees. Not to say a lot of places don't have a lot of room for improvement and that better working environments and benefits wouldn't pay dividends in many places, but, let's face it. Google wants elite employees so it offers the elite perks required to attract and retain them. Most of us ain't elite employees, though and that's why we're not getting those perks.

This x eleventy brazillion. I don't work for Google, but I do work for a company that starts by hiring the elite and compensates accordingly to retain them. In the transition to my new gig I went from bilingual engineering to. . . phone tech support. I thought I was hot shiat until I was assigned a mentor who speaks four languages. Anyway, our team works largely unsupervised for two reasons:
1) We're all inherently professional workers who don't need to be babysat to get shiat done, and
2) The company doesn't dick us in ways like work-life balance to crush our self-motivation.

The importance of #2 can't be emphasized enough, but #2 is only meaningful if you have #1 to start with. My last job was supporting a set of remote sales offices; these guys were impossible to supervise. But, they weren't elite; half of them were effin' useless. As a result, almost half our workload was a bad, endless deleted scene from "Office Space" where we submitted stacks of reports that reassured HQ we were actually working, which sucked balls if you were the sort of employee that actually tried to get shiat done. As much as I hated it, I doubt a dramatic change in company policy would've gotten any extra productivity out of those guys.


Everyone has to start somewhere.  If you're known for being a company with good benefits that treats its workers well, you will have the future elite applying for open positions in spades.  I know a surprising amount of people in town who rushed to apply for Google... for a freaking *book scanning* job.  Plenty more who applied for AdWords, and AFAIK they were recruiting recent grads for that.
 
2013-01-22 12:20:36 PM  
This is where I work
media.zenfs.com
 
2013-01-22 12:21:43 PM  

dumbobruni: how the fark do the big 4 firms keep landing on this list?

corporate sweatshops, all of them (deloitte is by far the worst, but ranked highest....hmmmm).

those salaries look great, but when you look at the number of hours worked its not much better than retail, and worse than office temp work.

absolutely no job security, and employee turnover runs at very high rates (20% or more).


The article pretty much spells it out when talking about Google. Flexible hours, vacation time, free food and company events, retirement packages, and so on. Hours worked and salary aren't the main factors. Benefits are.

I worked in accounting (not as an accountant, thankfully) and their high turnover had nothing to do with job security. In my years there I saw only a couple of people let go. I saw lots of people leave of their own volition. Hiring practices were very competitive and there was always an undercurrent of firms trying to poach talent from each other.
 
2013-01-22 12:26:29 PM  
Well, one doesn't exactly cause the other. Google provides a work environment that attracts the very best - they are productive and hard working before they get there. Rolling out a bunch of perks for employees that already spend their entire workday goofing off on the Internet probably wouldn't help at all.
 
2013-01-22 12:31:00 PM  
I've got to say, Google and Apple piss me off. As someone who has to try to hold the office together--even as our best software talent is fleeing to these companies--G&A can eat a bag of dicks. They're like talent vacuum cleaners, sucking the top employees out of every Valley company and top university. My company doesn't even suck--we're just not as prestigious as Google or Apple and don't have a theme park on our modest office park.

/I won't even go into how society loses out when the worlds smartest mathematicians and engineers devote their lives to "selling advertisements on a screen" rather than solving real-world, pressing problems.
 
2013-01-22 12:38:39 PM  

stiletto_the_wise: /I won't even go into how society loses out when the worlds smartest mathematicians and engineers devote their lives to "selling advertisements on a screen" rather than solving real-world, pressing problems.


...maybe if we put as much money into researching solutions for real-world, pressing problems as Google puts into researching solutions for selling ads on a screen, we could change that.

BUT

We might have to raise taxes to pay for that sort of thing.
 
2013-01-22 12:43:31 PM  

bsharitt: Lost Thought 00: That plus they learned that you can get 18 hours a day, 7 days a week out of someone for at least a few years before they go crazy and murder themselves by tricking them into thinking that living at the office is a "benefit"

That why (if I had the necessary skill level) I don't think I would ever be able to take a job at Google and similar firms even if I had a chance. I tend to value my family a bit more than any project I might be working on.


But why would you want another family outside the Googleplex? They surely cannot provide the fulfilment that you get from your brothers and sisters. You might miss the singularly event when the great Goo wakes.

/Stock Option Syndrome
 
2013-01-22 12:48:30 PM  
Where I work they are stingy about giving out raises. But they say you can earn more by 1) Getting promoted (which are few and far between). 2) Making a new site SOP or company SOP, where you get between $15-$30. Or 3) Recomending a person for employment and you get $300 after 3 months. But they screw you on that by hiring the person as a part timer for a week or so then promoting them to full time and then in 3 months you get a $5 starbucks card because they were hired as a part timer. Needless to say a lot of the better people leave after a little while due to them getting frustrated. I made mention of this when they were asking about how we can decrease turnover. But they look at me like Im from an another planet.
 
2013-01-22 12:51:40 PM  

tortilla burger: This is where I work
[media.zenfs.com image 600x187]


United Technologies? A couple years before I graduated they made a big push to hire grads from my school. Hired a bunch, required them to make a firm commitment and then laid them all off a few days before they were to start. The next year they complained that no on wanted to interview with them.
 
2013-01-22 12:57:33 PM  

StreetlightInTheGhetto: They do paid training for his specific job and other general knowledge training, he gets full benefits (medical, dental, life) at 90 days and then some (they comp part of the cost for massages, bus passes, you can apply for scholarships to return to school, paid jury duty, free or crazy comped food while working)... and that's just what I remember off the top of my head.


I can only assume you're fairly young and I base that assumption on the fact that for the vast majority of my career those sorts of benefits (aside from massages.. that one's sort of weird) were not considered "ridiculously good", they were considered a baseline for any employer to be remotely competitive in hiring. In fact, I've never actually worked anywhere that full benefits didn't kick in on day 1.

No offense or anything, but those benefits are actually shiattier than what I'm used to as a baseline. However, I have no doubt that in your experience they seem pretty good. Sadly, over the last couple years an awful lot of companies have taken exactly the opposite approach to hiring as Google has and decided to start treating their employees like they're buying workers by the pound...

Don't get too complacent. His benefits aren't that good compared to what many of us got as a baseline just ten years ago and you can get a shiatload better if you work for it.

dragonchild: I thought I was hot shiat until I was assigned a mentor who speaks four languages.


I remember the feeling of moving from a small company where I was doing all their network admin support to a multinational where I was just one shift admin among many. It was kind of disconcerting going from an environment where I was viewed as a sort of guru to one where my best work to that point was almost considered day to day routine.
 
2013-01-22 01:01:44 PM  

stiletto_the_wise: I've got to say, Google and Apple piss me off. As someone who has to try to hold the office together--even as our best software talent is fleeing to these companies--G&A can eat a bag of dicks. They're like talent vacuum cleaners, sucking the top employees out of every Valley company and top university. My company doesn't even suck--we're just not as prestigious as Google or Apple and don't have a theme park on our modest office park.

/I won't even go into how society loses out when the worlds smartest mathematicians and engineers devote their lives to "selling advertisements on a screen" rather than solving real-world, pressing problems.


Welcome to capitalism, enjoy your stay. "Selling advertisements on a screen" (which doesn't apply to Apple, only to Google) is obviously more profitable than whatever you are doing, otherwise your company wouldn't have trouble keeping it's top employees.
 
2013-01-22 01:05:26 PM  
well, uh, my company has free coffee

no cups, because in their "go green" initiative, they decided to stop providing styrofoam cups, so I guess you're supposed to drink it from your cupped hands if you don't have a mug at your cube
 
2013-01-22 01:06:33 PM  

LemSkroob: this.

I know some people at Google, and the 'free 3-meals a day' thing is really saying "gee, you know, you can work here all day! no need to go home!"


This isn't a new idea.  Hell - I worked for a fortune 50 company two decades ago that established that the more stuff they offer on campus - the less employees left to run errands.  That included dry cleaning, child care, car wash, decent cafeterias, and other perks.  Most of it wasn't free but it was enough to achieve the desired result:  keep peoples asses on campus.

/majority of googles perks will eventually end - they always do
 
2013-01-22 01:07:09 PM  

StreetlightInTheGhetto: They do paid training for his specific job and other general knowledge training, he gets full benefits (medical, dental, life) at 90 days and then some (they comp part of the cost for massages, bus passes, you can apply for scholarships to return to school, paid jury duty, free or crazy comped food while working)... and that's just what I remember off the top of my head.


Vegan Meat Popsicle: I can only assume you're fairly young and I base that assumption on the fact that for the vast majority of my career those sorts of benefits were not considered "ridiculously good", they were considered a baseline for any employer to be remotely competitive in hiring.


Yeah, it doesn't sound like he's found heaven so much as escaped abuse. Life feels so much better when the beatings stop. That said, I disagree with Vegan Meat Popsicle in that not wanting better is some sort of "complacency". If your SO found a gig he's happy at, the surest way to ruin it is to artificially raise expectations.
 
2013-01-22 01:07:18 PM  

StreetlightInTheGhetto: They do paid training for his specific job and other general knowledge training, he gets full benefits (medical, dental, life) at 90 days and then some (they comp part of the cost for massages, bus passes, you can apply for scholarships to return to school, paid jury duty, free or crazy comped food while working)... and that's just what I remember off the top of my head.


So he has pretty much your standard grownup job with a run of the mill benefit package.
 
2013-01-22 01:09:16 PM  

gingerjet: LemSkroob: this.

I know some people at Google, and the 'free 3-meals a day' thing is really saying "gee, you know, you can work here all day! no need to go home!"

This isn't a new idea.  Hell - I worked for a fortune 50 company two decades ago that established that the more stuff they offer on campus - the less employees left to run errands.  That included dry cleaning, child care, car wash, decent cafeterias, and other perks.  Most of it wasn't free but it was enough to achieve the desired result:  keep peoples asses on campus.

/majority of googles perks will eventually end - they always do


Well, it works for both employee and employer. If an errand that used to take an hour can be done in 10 minutes by having the service on site, both benefit.
 
2013-01-22 01:10:24 PM  

odinsposse: I worked in accounting (not as an accountant, thankfully) and their high turnover had nothing to do with job security. In my years there I saw only a couple of people let go. I saw lots of people leave of their own volition. Hiring practices were very competitive and there was always an undercurrent of firms trying to poach talent from each other


Which is true of google, Apple, Amazon, etc ... they are always poaching talent.  There is a high degree of turnover in the tech industry.  Almost all my friends who worked for google are now working elsewhere - the ability to advance and work on really interesting things gets more difficult the longer you are there.

/have always avoided companies like google simply because its less like working for a company and more like working for a cult
 
2013-01-22 01:11:17 PM  

Geotpf: Well, it works for both employee and employer. If an errand that used to take an hour can be done in 10 minutes by having the service on site, both benefit.


Don't disagree - my point is that this isn't a radical idea.
 
2013-01-22 01:11:36 PM  

stiletto_the_wise: I've got to say, Google and Apple piss me off. As someone who has to try to hold the office together--even as our best software talent is fleeing to these companies--G&A can eat a bag of dicks. They're like talent vacuum cleaners, sucking the top employees out of every Valley company and top university. My company doesn't even suck--we're just not as prestigious as Google or Apple and don't have a theme park on our modest office park.

/I won't even go into how society loses out when the worlds smartest mathematicians and engineers devote their lives to "selling advertisements on a screen" rather than solving real-world, pressing problems.


Sounds familliar.

"The thing I hate the most about advertising is that it attracts all the bright, creative and ambitious young people, leaving us mainly with the slow and self-obsessed to become our artists.. Modern art is a disaster area. Never in the field of human history has so much been used by so many to say so little."
― Banksy
 
2013-01-22 01:12:26 PM  
Enjoy it, Google employees, before they realize they can move everything to India for 1/3 the price.
 
2013-01-22 01:14:23 PM  

Timmy the Tumor: Enjoy it, Google employees, before they realize they can move everything to India for 1/3 the price.


The organizations that are ahead of the curve already know why this doesn't work.
 
2013-01-22 01:15:41 PM  

Geotpf: stiletto_the_wise: I've got to say, Google and Apple piss me off. As someone who has to try to hold the office together--even as our best software talent is fleeing to these companies--G&A can eat a bag of dicks. They're like talent vacuum cleaners, sucking the top employees out of every Valley company and top university. My company doesn't even suck--we're just not as prestigious as Google or Apple and don't have a theme park on our modest office park.

/I won't even go into how society loses out when the worlds smartest mathematicians and engineers devote their lives to "selling advertisements on a screen" rather than solving real-world, pressing problems.

Welcome to capitalism, enjoy your stay. "Selling advertisements on a screen" (which doesn't apply to Apple, only to Google) is obviously more profitable than whatever you are doing, otherwise your company wouldn't have trouble keeping it's top employees.


Its almost like "selling advertisements on a screen" is generating money to research things like automated cars, converting all written text into a large online library, and what other various ideas they might have.

Its like making a summer blockbuster to pay for that art-house indie labor of love......
 
2013-01-22 01:17:38 PM  

gingerjet: Which is true of google, Apple, Amazon, etc ... they are always poaching talent.  There is a high degree of turnover in the tech industry.  Almost all my friends who worked for google are now working elsewhere - the ability to advance and work on really interesting things gets more difficult the longer you are there.


I would imagine that you have basically zero impact as an individual contributor working for a company that large. At this point in my career, if I were to leave where I am today, it would be to form a start-up or something. The difference between creating something great and merely being "part of" creating something great.
 
2013-01-22 01:32:24 PM  

guilt by association: guilt by association: NGIS

Argh... I meant the NGA.


NGA, please.
 
2013-01-22 01:33:55 PM  

incendi: Vegan Meat Popsicle: No, Google is able to recruit already hard workers because they treat their employees well.

I find it unlikely that many companies would be able to duplicate their success simply by pouringthese types of luxuries on their existing employees. Not to say a lot of places don't have a lot of room for improvement and that better working environments and benefits wouldn't pay dividends in many places, but, let's face it. Google wants elite employees so it offers the elite perks required to attract and retain them.

Most of us ain't elite employees, though and that's why we're not getting those perks.

Pretty much nailed it. Google hires the best and has extremely high performance expectations, and the compensation reflects that.


They hire the best, but that's not the whole story. The whole story is they are hiring in an industry that is rather thin from an employment resource perspective. You need to be the best to court the best, in that regard. Being the best shelf stocker doesn't get you anything because there is a large supply of good shelf stockers and there is no innovation to be had in shelf stocking. Being the most creative developer, on the other hand, does get you something because there is a limited supply and there is still innovation to be had.
 
2013-01-22 01:34:29 PM  

StreetlightInTheGhetto: Vegan Meat Popsicle: No, Google is able to recruit already hard workers because they treat their employees well.

I find it unlikely that many companies would be able to duplicate their success simply by pouringthese types of luxuries on their existing employees. Not to say a lot of places don't have a lot of room for improvement and that better working environments and benefits wouldn't pay dividends in many places, but, let's face it. Google wants elite employees so it offers the elite perks required to attract and retain them.

Most of us ain't elite employees, though and that's why we're not getting those perks.

BS.

My SO is definitely not an 'elite' employee, but he's working for a business that treats him ridiculously well.  And in return, he a) works like crazy and constantly is thinking about how to improve his skills faster and b) he actually enjoys his work, and doesn't plan on leaving for the near future.
They do paid training for his specific job and other general knowledge training, he gets full benefits (medical, dental, life) at 90 days and then some (they comp part of the cost for massages, bus passes, you can apply for scholarships to return to school, paid jury duty, free or crazy comped food while working)... and that's just what I remember off the top of my head.

It's the first job he's had where they honestly treat employees damn well.  And somehow, even with all those benefits my SO gets for a somewhat skilled job (although they are *teaching* him those skills), they make a pretty damn big profit and do a crazy amount of business.  Funny how that works.


In my industry, this benefits package barely even meets baseline expectations. I wouldn't even consider working for a company that only gave full benefits after 90 days unless I was desperate. Most places I've worked offer this starting on your first day on the job, and the very longest I've ever had to wait in almost 20 years was the first of the next month after start date.

What industry does he work in?
 
2013-01-22 01:35:49 PM  

dumbobruni: how the fark do the big 4 firms keep landing on this list?

corporate sweatshops, all of them (deloitte is by far the worst, but ranked highest....hmmmm).

those salaries look great, but when you look at the number of hours worked its not much better than retail, and worse than office temp work.

absolutely no job security, and employee turnover runs at very high rates (20% or more).


But they hire totally hot, young college grads.
 
2013-01-22 01:39:35 PM  
Google hires the "best" according to what their hiring practices determine "best" to be.
 
2013-01-22 01:39:45 PM  

stiletto_the_wise: I've got to say, Google and Apple piss me off. As someone who has to try to hold the office together--even as our best software talent is fleeing to these companies--G&A can eat a bag of dicks. They're like talent vacuum cleaners, sucking the top employees out of every Valley company and top university. My company doesn't even suck--we're just not as prestigious as Google or Apple and don't have a theme park on our modest office park.

/I won't even go into how society loses out when the worlds smartest mathematicians and engineers devote their lives to "selling advertisements on a screen" rather than solving real-world, pressing problems.


Not just top talent. Kinda anyone they can get. They both try to contact me about every 6 months to see if I will jump ship and I'm not top talent in my place.
 
2013-01-22 01:42:06 PM  
You know why google provide you gourmet meals, lets you bring your dog to work and otherwise offers you all the comforts of home and then some? It's so you don't have an excuse to go home and can put in a lot more hours in the office.

/Wake up sheeple!
 
2013-01-22 01:42:07 PM  

stiletto_the_wise: I've got to say, Google and Apple piss me off. As someone who has to try to hold the office together--even as our best software talent is fleeing to these companies--G&A can eat a bag of dicks. They're like talent vacuum cleaners,... real-world, pressing problems.


The company I work for loses a lot of fresh, young talent because they all go to Dealer dot com for amenities like employee respect, recognition, and better pay.
That being said. They know what they are doing and that is a good way to hang on to employees.
Treating them like they don't count when they are the ones putting out the fires your highly touted suits start when you hire incompetence just because you like their suit and resume'.
Once these kids figure out they don't count with upper management, they bolt and I can't blame them. They want to do good work and be told they are doing good work. It's what works.
 
2013-01-22 01:42:14 PM  

palan: stiletto_the_wise: I've got to say, Google and Apple piss me off. As someone who has to try to hold the office together--even as our best software talent is fleeing to these companies--G&A can eat a bag of dicks. They're like talent vacuum cleaners, sucking the top employees out of every Valley company and top university. My company doesn't even suck--we're just not as prestigious as Google or Apple and don't have a theme park on our modest office park.

/I won't even go into how society loses out when the worlds smartest mathematicians and engineers devote their lives to "selling advertisements on a screen" rather than solving real-world, pressing problems.

Not just top talent. Kinda anyone they can get. They both try to contact me about every 6 months to see if I will jump ship and I'm not top talent in my place.


I'd say it comes with the territory. Like working/running an aerospace firm in Los Angeles or Huntsville
 
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