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(InfoWorld)   5 Microsoft Windows automatic updates from hell   (infoworld.com) divider line 63
    More: Fail, Automatic Updates  
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9585 clicks; posted to Geek » on 21 Jan 2013 at 10:38 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-21 04:54:57 PM

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: You must have a different Mac then me.


20 years ago, I joked that Compaq (a company that was basically built on the idea of cloning the original IBM PC's BIOS) would issue BIOS updates to fix trivial driver or OS bugs.

14 months ago, work issued me a Macbook Pro. I swear to christ I've done a dozen firmware updates on it since I've got the farking thing.
 
2013-01-21 05:49:16 PM
Hrm... Wonder if the Net one is what's wrong with my laptop.
Every time I start the thing it tries to install something called Net, and can never do so because it can't find the proper Annoys the heck out of me.
 
2013-01-21 05:50:12 PM
*proper files.

/darn phone.
 
2013-01-21 05:55:54 PM
That is why I have used WSUS on my networks for years.

My server downloads the patch the day it comes out. I watch the news for the next couple weeks to see if there any problems, and then go in and approve them. Next day, my whole network is patched.

I could do a better job if I tested all the patches myself, but honestly, I have too much stuff on my plate as it is.

I even follow the same pattern on my home network.
 
2013-01-21 06:16:58 PM

gaspode: There really is no excuse for a major software company to have any components in current release software


There are many companies that make software that aren't software companies. My company, for example, makes coatings.

gaspode: The question is for the developer, why have you not replaced this years ago?


Because at the end of the week, I fill out a timesheet. 80% of that time must be billed to one of our customers- our customers being the various SBUs across the company. I cannot bill time to a customer unless that customer gives me permission to do it, usually by initiating a project or entering a support ticket. They will not pay me to fix software that, to their eyes, isn't broken.

gaspode: but the client is too tight to pay for it to be replaced


Now imagine if all of your clients were like that.

We have code that, if you go by the comments in there, dates back to the earliest days of computers- we're talking 1950s. That code, by the way, will be going away, finally, over the next decade or so. It's a big project.
 
2013-01-21 07:32:56 PM
I can't download the December update that fixed clocks. It sits in limbo because everything else around it installs fine. The fix tool they provided seems to remove it, but when it comes back it won't download again.

I'm perfectly ok with it. If any update was to bug out, I'm thankful it's something minor.
 
2013-01-21 07:38:05 PM
Linux updates are horse crap. One set of updates I ran trashed the file that contains all the repository names. Which meant that I couldn't get any more updates until I edited the file. It takes genuine talent to provide an update that buggers someone's computer so badly that they're literally incapable of fixing it.

Windows updates have never been so devastating, but I do get sick of the computer rebooting itself at random just as I'm whiling away the late hours. Why not change it? Well, it seems my Windows box has a rather odd glitch that I haven't gotten 'round to fixing yet. Every time you reboot it, it re-sets the automatic update selection to default. Doesn't matter what I set it to, it re-sets as soon as I reboot, to a point on the clock and calendar when I'm virtually guaranteed to be using it.

I'd love to run that one by a MS technician some day.
 
2013-01-21 08:06:33 PM
Never had a problem with Windows Updates. I guess it's that way for most people.
 
2013-01-21 08:35:59 PM

likefunbutnot: 14 months ago, work issued me a Macbook Pro. I swear to christ I've done a dozen firmware updates on it since I've got the farking thing.


Are you sure they weren't software updates? Apple's automatic update feature will prompt you whenever it checks and finds there's a new version of certain programs like iTunes or Quicktime, as well as OS related upgrades, bug fixes, etc.

That said, I know nothing about firmware on the newer machines... nor on the older ones, but my ancient iMac hasn't needed any firmware upgrades in years, if at all.
 
2013-01-21 08:54:23 PM

t3knomanser: gaspode: There really is no excuse for a major software company to have any components in current release software

There are many companies that make software that aren't software companies. My company, for example, makes coatings.

gaspode: The question is for the developer, why have you not replaced this years ago?

Because at the end of the week, I fill out a timesheet. 80% of that time must be billed to one of our customers- our customers being the various SBUs across the company. I cannot bill time to a customer unless that customer gives me permission to do it, usually by initiating a project or entering a support ticket. They will not pay me to fix software that, to their eyes, isn't broken.

gaspode: but the client is too tight to pay for it to be replaced

Now imagine if all of your clients were like that.

We have code that, if you go by the comments in there, dates back to the earliest days of computers- we're talking 1950s. That code, by the way, will be going away, finally, over the next decade or so. It's a big project.


The person referred to their 'accounting software', implying a third party package. Custom software for one client is a different world, and one I pretty much live in.. That said this guys software doesnt work properly, so either it is a package and the vendor is sadly lacking, or it is bespoke and his employer is an idiot.

The code from the 50s/60s/70s runs on specialist platforms and hardware for the most part.. noone blames IBM for the fact it wont run on a new box today right? and if it does run on newer systems then the core code is in new frameworks. I just cant see the criticism of Microsoft on this one.
 
2013-01-21 09:52:52 PM
I thought this was going to be about the bad patches, like the Microsoft valentines gift to Autodesk Inventor 10 users, it killed all text in the drawing files. Then there was a time they made a patch that corrupted 3DS Max files back in 2004 or 2005, that wasn't fixed until MS released a patch to fix their damn patch.
 
2013-01-21 10:11:10 PM

loonatic112358: I thought this was going to be about the bad patches, like the Microsoft valentines gift to Autodesk Inventor 10 users, it killed all text in the drawing files. Then there was a time they made a patch that corrupted 3DS Max files back in 2004 or 2005, that wasn't fixed until MS released a patch to fix their damn patch.


Those are too far back, and too specific, to allow InfoWorld to sell advertising.

Honestly, I'm convinced the whole point of this slide show was so someone could work the whiny Windows 8 rant into something folks would actually read.
 
2013-01-22 08:05:11 AM
peasandcarrots

Linux updates are horse crap. One set of updates I ran trashed the file that contains all the repository names. Which meant that I couldn't get any more updates until I edited the file. It takes genuine talent to provide an update that buggers someone's computer so badly that they're literally incapable of fixing it.

Hmm. That's odd since that only happens during a full version upgrade (the equivalent of going from Vista to 7).

You have to explicitly kick that off and the instructions make it quite clear that you need to edit your repository file (because it doesn't get updated automatically for security reasons).

It's "literally unfixable" by opening a text file, doing a find-and-replace and pressing the save button. It takes less than a minute to do and the documentation comes with pictures. This is why Linux fails: it's too hard to use!


Windows updates are generally a good idea. They just get lulzy when combined with developer incompetence. I had a ticket years ago about a web app that suddenly stopped working. It was an out-of-bailiwick ticket too, so I had this obnoxious manager breathing down my neck (literally - as in stand right behind me and make like he was looking down my shirt; I had to talk to HR about harassment when he kept doing it after I asked for personal space) about a program I'd never seen before. "But it works in FireFox!!"

Turns out the vendor was passing passwords via ftp URL, like: ftp://sallyuser:goknicks123[nospam-﹫-backwards]w­ww*g­ovage ncy.gov. FireFox handled this by stripping out the security risk from the URL while a recent Windows Update caused IE to simply die without error.

I can't really fault Microsoft - it shouldn't have been coded like that in the first place - but the headache that issue caused me thanks to their graceless approach to the subject is what causes stupid articles like this.
 
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