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(SFGate)   FDA proposes strict regulations on all-metal hip replacements after complaints from the elderly about their grandchildren sticking refrigerator magnets on their rear ends   (sfgate.com) divider line 16
    More: Interesting, refrigerator magnet, hip replacement surgery, FDA, display device  
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1760 clicks; posted to Geek » on 21 Jan 2013 at 11:20 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-21 10:14:22 AM
That would be hilarious! If they actually did that I would hope we'd see more elective joint replacement from people with a sense of humor.
 
2013-01-21 11:37:10 AM
I see an opportunity for more grandpas to say this:

i162.photobucket.com
 
2013-01-21 11:59:03 AM
I'm not especially happy about press releases masquerading as "news". I'm particularly unhappy about press releases from FARKING AMBULANCE CHASERS masquerading as news. Especially when they're trying shut down a product that's helping thousands, perhaps millions, because a handful of people had adverse outcomes that might be related to the product, and they see a chance to make billions from the manufacturer (and grudgingly pass along a few million to the folks actually injured).

But, yeah, other than that, funny headline, I guess.
 
2013-01-21 12:18:05 PM
If metal on metal is bad in a car engine, why did they think it would be good in the human body?  My knee replacement isn't metal on metal, for obvious reasons.  A hip replacement device shouldn't be, either.
 
2013-01-21 12:33:32 PM
global3.memecdn.com

/ Oblig
// Grandpa rocks!!
 
2013-01-21 12:56:32 PM

Lipo: If metal on metal is bad in a car engine, why did they think it would be good in the human body?  My knee replacement isn't metal on metal, for obvious reasons.  A hip replacement device shouldn't be, either.


You think that a car is analogous to a biological system? I don't think anyone's going to be able to help you on this one, as we'd apparently have to explain the several decades of education you apparently missed out on and that would be a bit long for an internet post.
 
2013-01-21 12:57:24 PM
Unfortunately the plastic sockets aren't durable. Which might be okay for an 80 year old but not a 60 year old.

It wouldn't be a problem if you could replace or renew the plastic without having to take the hip apart. A laproscopicly repairable product would make a pile of cash with the boomers going gray.
 
2013-01-21 01:19:10 PM
Do magnets stick to titanium?
 
2013-01-21 01:21:46 PM
i0.kym-cdn.com
 
2013-01-21 01:36:29 PM
Going by the amount of 1-800-LAWSUIT MONEY type commercials on TV there must be people cursing and suffering by the 10,000's due to these metal on metal hip and knee replacements. Call me kookie but I doubt that industry would adapt to a material or process without it being tested and used for a very long time. Manufacturers of such devices are held to the highest standards, and they employ craftsmen who are from the top of the field. It's a blend of the finest machinists, inventors, those familiar with anatomy and having artistic creativity along with an tremendous knowledge of materials that work in the industry. Major props to those who are willing and able to provide relief and mobility to many.
 
2013-01-21 02:46:16 PM

Jim_Callahan: Lipo: If metal on metal is bad in a car engine, why did they think it would be good in the human body?  My knee replacement isn't metal on metal, for obvious reasons.  A hip replacement device shouldn't be, either.

You think that a car is analogous to a biological system? I don't think anyone's going to be able to help you on this one, as we'd apparently have to explain the several decades of education you apparently missed out on and that would be a bit long for an internet post.


In the context of two metal surfaces rubbing against each other freeing metallic tiny particles that can interfere with the larger system... yes?
 
2013-01-21 03:15:10 PM
Even though I am an atheist, I'm quietly grateful that this kind of degenerative joint disease does not run in my family. Even the fatties never had this happen to them.
 
2013-01-21 05:50:52 PM
Magnets? I wouldn't thought that replacement joints would have been made of stainless at least.
 
2013-01-21 07:32:18 PM
About time. Steve Austin's getting up there in age and his bionic legs didn't include new hips originally. Running 60 MPH and jumping from 40-foot heights only looks easy.
1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-01-21 09:11:22 PM

ProfessorOhki: Jim_Callahan: Lipo: If metal on metal is bad in a car engine, why did they think it would be good in the human body?  My knee replacement isn't metal on metal, for obvious reasons.  A hip replacement device shouldn't be, either.

You think that a car is analogous to a biological system? I don't think anyone's going to be able to help you on this one, as we'd apparently have to explain the several decades of education you apparently missed out on and that would be a bit long for an internet post.

In the context of two metal surfaces rubbing against each other freeing metallic tiny particles that can interfere with the larger system... yes?


Doing the basic math my car, travelling 3000 miles at 60 mph will have a total of 30 million piston cycles and camshaft rotations and 120 million balance shaft rotations. In all of that barely any metal is spalled off. Are you honestly trying to say that a hip joint encounters anywhere close to as many cycles as an engine?

Metal-on-metal contact is perfectly acceptable in the engineering of a hip joint, and is preferable because you gain nothing but added complexity by introducing UHMW into the joint. MoM joints wear far slower and make a more durable unit. Hell, you get more cost complexity to the mix when you do that because of engineering compromises. How many of you know that the model of knee replacement a certain biomedical company produces for the Japanese market offers more range of motion, costs nothing extra to make, but sells for three times more?

In all, patients need to dig the panties out of their ass about this. The metals used in biomedical implants are subject to cold welding, galling, and spalling. It's just their nature. Adding plastic as a bearing component means the unit wears out faster. It makes better sense to go with a more durable unit no matter what, even if choosing it means that they fail in different ways. Do you think the patient is going to be humble and pensive about their decision to go with a unit that wears out faster once a few years rolls on by and they have to replace it? The insurance company certainly isn't and the pain they will have to go through tells me they won't either.

Speaking of which, a sort of mentor of mine worked for one of the companies. If you ever wonder why knee replacement recovery hurts so bad, ponder that surgeons are the only people he knows that can break a solid 465-alloy stainless hammer.
 
2013-01-22 06:49:35 AM

Stibium: ProfessorOhki: Jim_Callahan: Lipo: If metal on metal is bad in a car engine, why did they think it would be good in the human body?  My knee replacement isn't metal on metal, for obvious reasons.  A hip replacement device shouldn't be, either.

You think that a car is analogous to a biological system? I don't think anyone's going to be able to help you on this one, as we'd apparently have to explain the several decades of education you apparently missed out on and that would be a bit long for an internet post.

In the context of two metal surfaces rubbing against each other freeing metallic tiny particles that can interfere with the larger system... yes?

Doing the basic math my car, travelling 3000 miles at 60 mph will have a total of 30 million piston cycles and camshaft rotations and 120 million balance shaft rotations. In all of that barely any metal is spalled off. Are you honestly trying to say that a hip joint encounters anywhere close to as many cycles as an engine?

Metal-on-metal contact is perfectly acceptable in the engineering of a hip joint, and is preferable because you gain nothing but added complexity by introducing UHMW into the joint. MoM joints wear far slower and make a more durable unit. Hell, you get more cost complexity to the mix when you do that because of engineering compromises. How many of you know that the model of knee replacement a certain biomedical company produces for the Japanese market offers more range of motion, costs nothing extra to make, but sells for three times more?

In all, patients need to dig the panties out of their ass about this. The metals used in biomedical implants are subject to cold welding, galling, and spalling. It's just their nature. Adding plastic as a bearing component means the unit wears out faster. It makes better sense to go with a more durable unit no matter what, even if choosing it means that they fail in different ways. Do you think the patient is going to be humble and pensive about their decisi ...


While you obviously have an impressive amount of knowledge about materials engineering (no sarcasm), the problems with MoM joint replacements are not mechanical, they are biological. The metal surfaces wear less than the high density polymers, true, but the small amount of metal ions that are released by wear build up in tissues around the replacement and can cause chronic inflammation and other reactions. The shed polymer particles, on the other hand, are biologically inert. It turns out it is fairly simple to open up a joint and replace the polymer, but replacing a MoM joint involves removing the entire implant components (that have been cemented into the bone).
 
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