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(The Consumerist)   Not just no. HELL NO   (consumerist.com) divider line 147
    More: Obvious, taxiing  
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42436 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Jan 2013 at 4:32 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-21 12:37:49 AM

st1cky: Last time I used a taxi was 2 months ago I was shiat-faced, racked up a $30 fare, spilled potato chips all over the backseat in his cab, then realized I had NO money when I arrived at my destination


So did you shiat in the back seat?
 
2013-01-21 12:50:00 AM
How about you clearly state where you want to go when you enter the cab instead of texting on your phone
 
2013-01-21 12:53:49 AM

Larva Lump: Oh ffs.

[home.earthlink.net image 500x275]

// G-7


But he's just a poor college student who is FLYING home..clearly he needs the dollar more...lol, whole story seems made up
 
2013-01-21 01:08:46 AM
What amazes me are the under-five-dollar cab fares people keep talking about. Hell, it's ten bucks here (not counting the tip) just to go the 2.5 miles from my work to downtown. I took a cab to the theater last month and it was over $20 just to go six miles.
 
2013-01-21 01:18:44 AM

KrispyKritter: nipner: As a woman, I've been given the cabbie run around several times.. Long route, "got lost", taking a street they know construction is happening, etc... So hell no, I give them what the ride is worth, and tell em to call the cops, but they never do.
Funny that these things rarely happen if there is a man in the cab with me. So now, first thing I do when I get in a cab is take a pic of their cabbie-license that they must display on the dashboard, then fire up the GPS. Seems to help once they know I'm not farking around.

you must be a pleasure to be around. good grief.


Hey! She is absolutely right and YOU sound like you have problems with the wimmen folk.
I bet if you heard/read this from a guy you'd say 'Fark, YEAH, dude! Don't fark around with them damned raghead cab drivers!'
 
2013-01-21 01:53:03 AM
Last time I took a cab, $5 wouldn't have gotten me far enough to be worth paying $5 for the ride, let alone another $5 for a tip.
 
2013-01-21 01:58:21 AM
I miss taxis in Japan...no tipping (they're insulted if you do) and the driver will always open the door for you (with a lever operated from the driver's seat, he never has to get up, but still...)
 
2013-01-21 02:02:36 AM
Cabs should be able to make money on the cost of the fare alone. If they can't then they shouldn't be in business.
 
2013-01-21 02:44:33 AM

BakaDono: I miss taxis in Japan...no tipping (they're insulted if you do) and the driver will always open the door for you (with a lever operated from the driver's seat, he never has to get up, but still...)


And they wear those awesome white gloves.
 
2013-01-21 02:45:51 AM

Fark Rye For Many Whores: I shiat in the cab when this happens.


Report him to the waterboarders, same as usual.
 
2013-01-21 02:55:11 AM

Robert Farker: titwrench: Robert Farker: moothemagiccow: Can anyone else name the other FARK threads that are basically one 1,000,000 comment thread?

-Cop threads
-Tipping threads

Seriously you guys come in here and argue about the exact same shiat, have the same prepared remarks every time. It's weird. The only thing that's different is the article and the first four comments.

If you are trying to be ironic, stop, just stop.

Why? Moo is 100% correct. At this point in time you can pretty much write your own tipping thread, cycling thread, gun thread, etc. This shiat is so predictable any more.

Including the people who whine about how predictable it is...


And the people whining about the people who whine about how predictable it is.
 
2013-01-21 03:41:27 AM
I used to take a cab to go see my gf. The trip was $20 I would tip $20. One cabbie took me a second time and gave me his cell number back when cell phone were just kicking off(bag phone, LOL). Told me to call anytime I needed a ride. I woke his ass up more than once. He was always prompt and happy to hear from me.
 
2013-01-21 05:08:49 AM
Is there any profession that doesn't need tipping in the US?
 
2013-01-21 05:59:06 AM

lucksi: Is there any profession that doesn't need tipping in the US?


Well, there's no real "need" to tip, but it's a big social taboo if you don't. To some, it can be ostracizing, depending on the company you keep, to not tip, or to not tip enough, even for service that is less than ideal.

Another part is that the arbitrary number for the ideal tip amount keeps going up. What was once 10% a few years back, went to 15%, and now to 20%, with no real increase in the level of service. Tipping is nice, we should all do it when the service is good, but the amount we tip should be based upon other factors than simply the price of our meal/cab ride/haircut/etc. One factor should be what the consumer can afford to pay, another factor should be what the consumer thinks is fair price. Now, servers/bartenders/etc. etc. will always say things along the lines of "if you can't afford to tip 20%, then you shouldn't be eating/drinking here" which is just stupid. Eating out to some is a luxury, something to be savoured and enjoyed, and like a fine bottle of scotch, sometimes people have to save up to afford it. Another factor is, if you're spending $200 on a night out with your loved one, and you're there for maybe 45 minutes, an hour, $40 may be too damn much to tip to someone who merely brings you your food and comes around every 15 minutes asking if everything is alright.

So to finally answer your question, ... it seems more and more that, people who deal with the public and provide a service, are also demanding tips.
 
2013-01-21 07:07:22 AM
Nothing about the fact that the cab ride only costs $5? Can't take the 10, 15 minutes to walk that? (Okay, maybe the weather's bad.)

Cost me $20 to go 6km, about an hours walk.
 
2013-01-21 07:44:50 AM

Larva Lump: Oh ffs.

[home.earthlink.net image 500x275]

// G-7


why does everyone keep posting white rectangles. i remember the pictures, and that's what i loved about fark

but white squares what's up with that
 
2013-01-21 08:34:07 AM

TheJoe03: wambu: In college, in a snowstorm I was trying to get to the Philadelphia airport to get home for Christmas. I was running late for the flight and the cabbie took a second fare that was "on the way" He turned the meter off when it got to $4, which he said would have been my fare to the airport if not for the detour. All I had was a $5 bill to my name and had not eaten all day. He was offended that I asked for my change even when I apologized and told him that I needed the money to eat. He said his family had to eat too. I called a cop over and he made the cabbie give me my change. I still like Philadelphia, though.

Maybe you shouldn't be taking a cab when you're that broke. Anyways, I hope you realize that your story makes YOU look like the bad guy, not the cabbie.


I was 17,  stranded in a snowstorm, and trying to get home and had taken the bus and thumbed to Philadelphia from upstate NY.  I wasn't going to stiff the guy, but he didn't even offer me the chance to give him a tip; he just kept the change without asking and I'm the bad guy? What's your point again?
 
2013-01-21 08:49:27 AM

wambu: as trying to get to the Philadelphia airport to get home for Christmas. I was running late for the flight and the cabbie took a second fare that was "on the way" He turned the meter off when it got to $4, which he said would have been my fare to the airport if not for the detour. All I had was a $5 bill to my name and had not eaten all day. He was offended that I asked for my change even when I apologized and told him that I needed the money to eat. He said his family had to eat too. I called a cop over and he made the cabbie give me m


You're an asshole.
 
2013-01-21 08:52:36 AM

wambu:

I was 17,  stranded in a snowstorm, and trying to get home and had taken the bus and thumbed to Philadelphia from upstate NY.  I wasn't going to stiff the guy, but he didn't even offer me the chance to give him a tip; he just kept the change without asking and I'm the bad guy? What's your point again?


You said he turned off the meter at $4 but you only had $5. What if the fare was $6? You were going to stiff the guy.
 
2013-01-21 08:54:05 AM
Okay... a $5.00 cab ride? In Toronto, it literally costs me $4.25 to SIT INSIDE OF THE CAB.

One time on our cab ride home from a delightful trip to Disney World, I leaned into the cab and asked "Do you take VISA or debit?" to which he replied "Yes. Hop in" (I had like $10 on hand), I even asked AGAIN half way there. He drives us past our destination and puts us out about 10 minutes, we were on the highway, he had to get off at the next ramp and turning around. Then when he was going to turn onto our street he PASSED it after I repeatedly said "turn right here". Every street was one way until the next major intersection. He turns around all pissed off drives us home and says "I ran out of credit card slips (because this cabbie didn't have a machine), you'll have to pay cash". I explained I didn't have any cash and that I explained this to him when I got into the cab. He pops the trunk and stares at us (while we get our luggage) and for some dumbass reason I hand him my $10 (on a $50+ bill). Worst cab ride ever. I tried calling the management company but it was not in service.

To this day, we take transit home from the airport or have a family member pick us up. He shat on our good vacation.
 
2013-01-21 08:55:00 AM

tbhouston: Larva Lump: Oh ffs.

[home.earthlink.net image 500x275]

// G-7

But he's just a poor college student who is FLYING home..clearly he needs the dollar more...lol, whole story seems made up


You're right, shouldn't have wasted time posting.
 
2013-01-21 09:04:49 AM
Every tipping thread includes posters from entitled snowflakes with humanities degrees demanding a tip even when service has been terrible.
 
2013-01-21 09:11:56 AM
What's interesting to me are the number of people making reference to "calling the police" in this thread, as a method of calling out scumbag taxi drivers.

Is this just a way of escalating the argument, or are the tips legally required now in some areas? Pretty sure it's the former, but so many have said it I just want to make sure, in case I ever need to get a taxi in the States.

/Not American.
//You tip for everything.
///Also, why tip bartenders for taking a bottle out of the fridge, taking the cap off and handing it to you?
 
2013-01-21 09:40:11 AM
css:

I got into a cab once and the guy drove straight past the address I gave him, and just kept going. I kept yelling, then screaming at him to turn back, and he told me to shut up. I was about 8 months pregnant at the time, and the whole thing scared me shiatless. The guy drove me about five miles past where I was supposed to be before he finally stopped at a red light, and I jumped out and ran. He came after me, screaming "farking biatch! farking biatch!" at me until I jumped into another cab. I got the guy's medallion number and called 311 to report him, ended up having to go to taxi court to make a complaint. Found out when I got there that they had filed charges against me for theft of services, since I told them I hadn't paid the cab driver. The judge thoughtfully dropped the charges against me when I told my story. Not much happened to the cab driver, he got a small fine and a couple of points on his license.

/While I was waiting my turn for court appearance, I was talking to somebody else who was waiting his turn. He was there because he'd used a credit card to pay for his ride, and his driver had charged him $800 for a tip.
//New York farking City
 
2013-01-21 10:09:52 AM

Ostman: What's interesting to me are the number of people making reference to "calling the police" in this thread, as a method of calling out scumbag taxi drivers.

Is this just a way of escalating the argument, or are the tips legally required now in some areas? Pretty sure it's the former, but so many have said it I just want to make sure, in case I ever need to get a taxi in the States.

/Not American.
//You tip for everything.
///Also, why tip bartenders for taking a bottle out of the fridge, taking the cap off and handing it to you?


because they could ignore your swill drinking ass to pour for someone else that appreciates the asshole management a bartender has to do.
 
2013-01-21 10:29:02 AM

Girion47: Ostman: What's interesting to me are the number of people making reference to "calling the police" in this thread, as a method of calling out scumbag taxi drivers.

Is this just a way of escalating the argument, or are the tips legally required now in some areas? Pretty sure it's the former, but so many have said it I just want to make sure, in case I ever need to get a taxi in the States.

/Not American.
//You tip for everything.
///Also, why tip bartenders for taking a bottle out of the fridge, taking the cap off and handing it to you?

because they could ignore your swill drinking ass to pour for someone else that appreciates the asshole management a bartender has to do.


No need to be touchy about it.

It just seems strange to me that consumers in the US tolerate this. I don't know what the average price of a beer is in a bar where you are, but you can safely add a dollar to it for the tip? Why not just pay the bartender a fair wage and scrap the tip system, which seems to lead to confusion and gradually increasing tip percentages (i.e. it was 15% the one time I was in the US six years ago, now I see people haughtily informed they need to give at least 20% to be "fair" to good staff, in recent tipping threads).

/Also, I presume you used to, or still do, work in a bar?
 
2013-01-21 10:36:06 AM

Ostman: Girion47: Ostman: What's interesting to me are the number of people making reference to "calling the police" in this thread, as a method of calling out scumbag taxi drivers.

Is this just a way of escalating the argument, or are the tips legally required now in some areas? Pretty sure it's the former, but so many have said it I just want to make sure, in case I ever need to get a taxi in the States.

/Not American.
//You tip for everything.
///Also, why tip bartenders for taking a bottle out of the fridge, taking the cap off and handing it to you?

because they could ignore your swill drinking ass to pour for someone else that appreciates the asshole management a bartender has to do.

No need to be touchy about it.

It just seems strange to me that consumers in the US tolerate this. I don't know what the average price of a beer is in a bar where you are, but you can safely add a dollar to it for the tip? Why not just pay the bartender a fair wage and scrap the tip system, which seems to lead to confusion and gradually increasing tip percentages (i.e. it was 15% the one time I was in the US six years ago, now I see people haughtily informed they need to give at least 20% to be "fair" to good staff, in recent tipping threads).

/Also, I presume you used to, or still do, work in a bar?


I know of bars where I can get beers for less than a dollar, or a pint glass of liquor and ice with a splash of mixer for $1.50. So yeah, adding a dollar to the tip isn't a big deal at all.

I've never worked in the food/bar industry.
 
2013-01-21 11:01:36 AM
v015o.popscreen.com

That's $2.95, including the luggage.
Tell me, how may stores are there named Bloomingdales in this town?
One, why?
We passed it twice.
It's still $2.95, including the luggage.
Yeah, well there's $3.00, including the tip.
 
2013-01-21 11:11:44 AM

dkny: lucksi: Is there any profession that doesn't need tipping in the US?

Well, there's no real "need" to tip, but it's a big social taboo if you don't. To some, it can be ostracizing, depending on the company you keep, to not tip, or to not tip enough, even for service that is less than ideal.

Another part is that the arbitrary number for the ideal tip amount keeps going up. What was once 10% a few years back, went to 15%, and now to 20%, with no real increase in the level of service. Tipping is nice, we should all do it when the service is good, but the amount we tip should be based upon other factors than simply the price of our meal/cab ride/haircut/etc. One factor should be what the consumer can afford to pay, another factor should be what the consumer thinks is fair price. Now, servers/bartenders/etc. etc. will always say things along the lines of "if you can't afford to tip 20%, then you shouldn't be eating/drinking here" which is just stupid. Eating out to some is a luxury, something to be savoured and enjoyed, and like a fine bottle of scotch, sometimes people have to save up to afford it. Another factor is, if you're spending $200 on a night out with your loved one, and you're there for maybe 45 minutes, an hour, $40 may be too damn much to tip to someone who merely brings you your food and comes around every 15 minutes asking if everything is alright.

So to finally answer your question, ... it seems more and more that, people who deal with the public and provide a service, are also demanding tips.


The number goes up because the base pay goes down.

I don't care for it but I am sure as shiat not going to punish professional servants for corporate greed.

And no, being poor is not an excuse. That is a reason to go out less, not a reason to demand servants take a cut for you.

The benefit of a service economy is that the rest of us live like kings. The downside is we have to ensure our servants can survive in this economy. Anything less results in a race to the bottom no different than the walmarts of the world underpaying staff or crop pickers getting screwed.
 
2013-01-21 11:42:25 AM

titwrench: Robert Farker: moothemagiccow: Can anyone else name the other FARK threads that are basically one 1,000,000 comment thread?

-Cop threads
-Tipping threads

Seriously you guys come in here and argue about the exact same shiat, have the same prepared remarks every time. It's weird. The only thing that's different is the article and the first four comments.

If you are trying to be ironic, stop, just stop.

Why? Moo is 100% correct. At this point in time you can pretty much write your own tipping thread, cycling thread, gun thread, etc. This shiat is so predictable any more.


Actually, no. It's a consumerist article that doesn't involve whining over a non-problem, so it certainly is not like every other thread.
 
2013-01-21 12:29:02 PM

Girion47: Ostman: Girion47: Ostman: What's interesting to me are the number of people making reference to "calling the police" in this thread, as a method of calling out scumbag taxi drivers.

Is this just a way of escalating the argument, or are the tips legally required now in some areas? Pretty sure it's the former, but so many have said it I just want to make sure, in case I ever need to get a taxi in the States.

/Not American.
//You tip for everything.
///Also, why tip bartenders for taking a bottle out of the fridge, taking the cap off and handing it to you?

because they could ignore your swill drinking ass to pour for someone else that appreciates the asshole management a bartender has to do.

No need to be touchy about it.

It just seems strange to me that consumers in the US tolerate this. I don't know what the average price of a beer is in a bar where you are, but you can safely add a dollar to it for the tip? Why not just pay the bartender a fair wage and scrap the tip system, which seems to lead to confusion and gradually increasing tip percentages (i.e. it was 15% the one time I was in the US six years ago, now I see people haughtily informed they need to give at least 20% to be "fair" to good staff, in recent tipping threads).

/Also, I presume you used to, or still do, work in a bar?

I know of bars where I can get beers for less than a dollar, or a pint glass of liquor and ice with a splash of mixer for $1.50. So yeah, adding a dollar to the tip isn't a big deal at all.

I've never worked in the food/bar industry.


Fair enough, but not everyone has that luxury. Just to give you an example, I live in the SE of Ireland, and there are a few pubs where I can get a large bottle of Guinness for €3.33 (with 3 for €10 deals).
But unless the entire population of my town can be crammed into those few pubs, you're looking at paying €4+. Say roughly the same pricing for pints of beer.

So what's the average where you live that most people would end up paying. Then add the dollar to the tip and see how expensive it starts to get.

/Tips for bartenders don't happen where I live, as the minimum wage for all workers over 18 is €8.65 / hour, with €6.92 (IIRC) for those in their first year of training. (And no, I'm not so naive that I think every bartender in the country is being treated fairly by their employers, but that doesn't justify introducing tipping for everyone).
//What do bartenders in the US earn?
 
2013-01-21 12:30:55 PM

Ostman: Girion47: Ostman: Girion47: Ostman: What's interesting to me are the number of people making reference to "calling the police" in this thread, as a method of calling out scumbag taxi drivers.

Is this just a way of escalating the argument, or are the tips legally required now in some areas? Pretty sure it's the former, but so many have said it I just want to make sure, in case I ever need to get a taxi in the States.

/Not American.
//You tip for everything.
///Also, why tip bartenders for taking a bottle out of the fridge, taking the cap off and handing it to you?

because they could ignore your swill drinking ass to pour for someone else that appreciates the asshole management a bartender has to do.

No need to be touchy about it.

It just seems strange to me that consumers in the US tolerate this. I don't know what the average price of a beer is in a bar where you are, but you can safely add a dollar to it for the tip? Why not just pay the bartender a fair wage and scrap the tip system, which seems to lead to confusion and gradually increasing tip percentages (i.e. it was 15% the one time I was in the US six years ago, now I see people haughtily informed they need to give at least 20% to be "fair" to good staff, in recent tipping threads).

/Also, I presume you used to, or still do, work in a bar?

I know of bars where I can get beers for less than a dollar, or a pint glass of liquor and ice with a splash of mixer for $1.50. So yeah, adding a dollar to the tip isn't a big deal at all.

I've never worked in the food/bar industry.

Fair enough, but not everyone has that luxury. Just to give you an example, I live in the SE of Ireland, and there are a few pubs where I can get a large bottle of Guinness for €3.33 (with 3 for €10 deals).
But unless the entire population of my town can be crammed into those few pubs, you're looking at paying €4+. Say roughly the same pricing for pints of beer.

So what's the average where you live that most people would end up paying ...


about 1.60 Euros an hour. Rest of the income is derived from tips.
 
2013-01-21 12:50:12 PM

Niveras: Nothing about the fact that the cab ride only costs $5? Can't take the 10, 15 minutes to walk that? (Okay, maybe the weather's bad.)

Cost me $20 to go 6km, about an hours walk.


Late to explain, but mine was $5 in 1984-85 dollars. Plus I had luggage, and NO did not have public transpo after a certain time. It would have been about a 4 mile walk from near the Superdome through some sketchy ass neighborhoods after dark. Worth the 5 bucks to me, even though that was the equivalent of 20 draft beers at my local watering hole on Sundays. And I did tip if I wasn't getting ripped off.
 
2013-01-21 01:10:57 PM

Ostman: Fair enough, but not everyone has that luxury. Just to give you an example, I live in the SE of Ireland, and there are a few pubs where I can get a large bottle of Guinness for €3.33 (with 3 for €10 deals).
But unless the entire population of my town can be crammed into those few pubs, you're looking at paying €4+. Say roughly the same pricing for pints of beer.

So what's the average where you live that most people would end up paying. Then add the dollar to the tip and see how expensive it starts to get.


Gee, it's almost like the portion of bill that is an American tip is already factored into the pricing of the goods you buy. :)

I think if informed of how things work elsewhere, 99% of waiters in America would prefer to be treated like professionals with respect, payed well, and not looked down upon (like in Germany). But the average worker in these jobs hardly has the ability to stick it to their bosses and demand change. That gets you fired and replaced. Combine that with a hatred for all things 47% and union and it's a pretty steep climb to enact change.

The wage for waitstaff where I used to work actually went down over around a 25 year period in non-inflation adjusted dollars. They were paying 3.25 an hour when the oldest waitress I worked with was hired. We were all paid 2.15 when I worked there and there was talk of it going down again before I quit. Figuring inflation that is a base wage adjustment of what, at least a 2/3 reduction?
 
2013-01-21 01:19:07 PM

ThurmanMerman: I got into a cab once and the guy drove straight past the address I gave him, and just kept going. I kept yelling, then screaming at him to turn back, and he told me to shut up. I was about 8 months pregnant at the time, and the whole thing scared me shiatless.


So... "shiatless"...?
2.bp.blogspot.com
ok :(
 
2013-01-21 01:51:30 PM
Here in Philly, it is not uncommon for a cabbie to see you've been drinking and take you 12 blocks out of your way. There have been many a time when I have to leap out of the cab and not pay them anything. scumbags.
 
2013-01-21 05:27:20 PM

wambu: TheJoe03: wambu: In college, in a snowstorm I was trying to get to the Philadelphia airport to get home for Christmas. I was running late for the flight and the cabbie took a second fare that was "on the way" He turned the meter off when it got to $4, which he said would have been my fare to the airport if not for the detour. All I had was a $5 bill to my name and had not eaten all day. He was offended that I asked for my change even when I apologized and told him that I needed the money to eat. He said his family had to eat too. I called a cop over and he made the cabbie give me my change. I still like Philadelphia, though.

Maybe you shouldn't be taking a cab when you're that broke. Anyways, I hope you realize that your story makes YOU look like the bad guy, not the cabbie.

I was 17,  stranded in a snowstorm, and trying to get home and had taken the bus and thumbed to Philadelphia from upstate NY.  I wasn't going to stiff the guy, but he didn't even offer me the chance to give him a tip; he just kept the change without asking and I'm the bad guy? What's your point again?


That you were in the wrong, not the cabbie. Also, don't take a cab with only 5 bucks, it's not a bus.
 
2013-01-21 09:15:50 PM

TheJoe03: That you were in the wrong, not the cabbie. Also, don't take a cab with only 5 bucks, it's not a bus.


i.imgur.com
 
2013-01-21 11:14:55 PM

wambu: TheJoe03: That you were in the wrong, not the cabbie. Also, don't take a cab with only 5 bucks, it's not a bus.

[i.imgur.com image 519x355]


At least you can admit now that you were being a whiny little baby.
 
2013-01-22 12:05:13 AM

Ostman: What's interesting to me are the number of people making reference to "calling the police" in this thread, as a method of calling out scumbag taxi drivers.

Is this just a way of escalating the argument, or are the tips legally required now in some areas? Pretty sure it's the former, but so many have said it I just want to make sure, in case I ever need to get a taxi in the States.

/Not American.
//You tip for everything.
///Also, why tip bartenders for taking a bottle out of the fridge, taking the cap off and handing it to you?


Calling police is more like calling a bluff. The cop will probably ask the rider to pay the meter and take it up with court; if the rider complains further, probably call cab dispatch and get a quote for the route and make rider pay that and make case in court.

I am sure the cabby does not want to wait around 30 mins for a cop to show up to settle things, and a cop will not enforce a tip.
 
2013-01-22 04:31:57 AM

Smackledorfer: Ostman: Fair enough, but not everyone has that luxury. Just to give you an example, I live in the SE of Ireland, and there are a few pubs where I can get a large bottle of Guinness for €3.33 (with 3 for €10 deals).
But unless the entire population of my town can be crammed into those few pubs, you're looking at paying €4+. Say roughly the same pricing for pints of beer.

So what's the average where you live that most people would end up paying. Then add the dollar to the tip and see how expensive it starts to get.

Gee, it's almost like the portion of bill that is an American tip is already factored into the pricing of the goods you buy. :)

I think if informed of how things work elsewhere, 99% of waiters in America would prefer to be treated like professionals with respect, payed well, and not looked down upon (like in Germany). But the average worker in these jobs hardly has the ability to stick it to their bosses and demand change. That gets you fired and replaced. Combine that with a hatred for all things 47% and union and it's a pretty steep climb to enact change.

The wage for waitstaff where I used to work actually went down over around a 25 year period in non-inflation adjusted dollars. They were paying 3.25 an hour when the oldest waitress I worked with was hired. We were all paid 2.15 when I worked there and there was talk of it going down again before I quit. Figuring inflation that is a base wage adjustment of what, at least a 2/3 reduction?


I think we just have a cultural misunderstanding. I wouldn't describe any of what bar staff makes as tip, just wages (the tip isn't factored in, it's just their wage from my point of view).
And I'm not saying the way we do it is better either, as I often enough meet waiters / bar staff here who are obviously bored with their job and not helpful in the least; it was a shock when I was in the US how friendly the staff seemed everywhere. So at least they're motivated to give you the best experience possible rather than just show up, mooch around and collect their liveable wage at the end of the week.

Notwithstanding , those wages you mentioned are atrocious. It's not even subsistence income, bordering on Philippine sweat shop bad. But again, I feel it's just my point of view that does it; I can't wrap my head around someone relying on something as...charitable?...as tips to form the majority of their wages.

/Anyway, thanks for explaining it to me, I feel a bit more informed on the US situation for the next time one of these threads appears.
 
2013-01-22 08:18:21 AM

Ostman: Smackledorfer: Ostman: Fair enough, but not everyone has that luxury. Just to give you an example, I live in the SE of Ireland, and there are a few pubs where I can get a large bottle of Guinness for €3.33 (with 3 for €10 deals).
But unless the entire population of my town can be crammed into those few pubs, you're looking at paying €4+. Say roughly the same pricing for pints of beer.

So what's the average where you live that most people would end up paying. Then add the dollar to the tip and see how expensive it starts to get.

Gee, it's almost like the portion of bill that is an American tip is already factored into the pricing of the goods you buy. :)

I think if informed of how things work elsewhere, 99% of waiters in America would prefer to be treated like professionals with respect, payed well, and not looked down upon (like in Germany). But the average worker in these jobs hardly has the ability to stick it to their bosses and demand change. That gets you fired and replaced. Combine that with a hatred for all things 47% and union and it's a pretty steep climb to enact change.

The wage for waitstaff where I used to work actually went down over around a 25 year period in non-inflation adjusted dollars. They were paying 3.25 an hour when the oldest waitress I worked with was hired. We were all paid 2.15 when I worked there and there was talk of it going down again before I quit. Figuring inflation that is a base wage adjustment of what, at least a 2/3 reduction?

I think we just have a cultural misunderstanding. I wouldn't describe any of what bar staff makes as tip, just wages (the tip isn't factored in, it's just their wage from my point of view).
And I'm not saying the way we do it is better either, as I often enough meet waiters / bar staff here who are obviously bored with their job and not helpful in the least; it was a shock when I was in the US how friendly the staff seemed everywhere. So at least they're motivated to give you the best experience ...


It is crazy how little they make, but a good bartender can make upwards of 500 a night in tips.
 
2013-01-22 09:49:04 AM

TheJoe03: wambu: TheJoe03: That you were in the wrong, not the cabbie. Also, don't take a cab with only 5 bucks, it's not a bus.

[i.imgur.com image 519x355]

At least you can admit now that you were being a whiny little baby.


That as you.

[welcometofark.jpg]
 
2013-01-22 12:32:57 PM

Girion47: It is crazy how little they make, but a good bartender can make upwards of 500 a night in tips.


While technically correct, presenting 500 a night as though it were a representative example of what skilled and dedicated bartenders make is dishonest and you know it.
 
2013-01-22 12:51:27 PM

Smackledorfer: Girion47: It is crazy how little they make, but a good bartender can make upwards of 500 a night in tips.

While technically correct, presenting 500 a night as though it were a representative example of what skilled and dedicated bartenders make is dishonest and you know it.


I didn't say it was average, but it isn't unheard of.
 
2013-01-22 02:28:46 PM
This happened to me less than a year ago. I was in NYC and was leaving a bar and headed back to my hotel. I was staying in an easily recognizable hotel (Doubletree) and told the cabbie the name of the hotel, the name of the street that it was on, and the district where it was located. The moment he asked me if he should go left or right I started getting mad. When he pulled to the side of the road to ask another cabbie for directions, I got pissed and started getting on his case about GPS.

After arguing with him for a while I demanded that he drop me off immediately and I begrudgingly paid HALF of what the meter was displaying. We argued about this for a while, but the bottom line is that if I am paying a professional driver and have given that driver ample information, their failure is not on my dime.

However... since it was in the middle of the night and I was no longer in a highly populated area, there were no more cabs. I walked the final mile or so back to the hotel, satisfied that I didn't get stuck paying for incompetence.
 
2013-01-22 03:27:39 PM

wambu: TheJoe03: wambu: TheJoe03: That you were in the wrong, not the cabbie. Also, don't take a cab with only 5 bucks, it's not a bus.

[i.imgur.com image 519x355]

At least you can admit now that you were being a whiny little baby.

That as you.

[welcometofark.jpg]


I'm not complaining or whining, just calling you out. Welcome to fark yourself.
 
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