Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Oregon Live)   3500 ton bridge successfully shifted 60 feet sideways   (photos.oregonlive.com ) divider line
    More: Cool, Sellwood Bridge, The Oregonian, Willamette River, detour  
•       •       •

7352 clicks; posted to Geek » on 20 Jan 2013 at 10:24 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



27 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-01-20 10:26:23 AM  
Ridiculous. Just put a 3D un-printer on one end of the bridge, connect a hose to a 3D printer 60 feet away and press "print". Two espressos later, it's all done.
 
2013-01-20 10:28:30 AM  
And no one thought to timelapse that?
 
2013-01-20 10:51:38 AM  
Fox has a timelapse

They also think the bridge is 2 miles long.
 
2013-01-20 11:16:33 AM  
www.filmenoi2012.in

ONLY 60 feet? Pussies...
 
2013-01-20 11:19:41 AM  
Unimpressed

www.vopus.org
 
2013-01-20 11:38:53 AM  
thoughtzine.com
Made me think of this.
 
2013-01-20 12:01:28 PM  
It's just a jump.. to the left.
 
2013-01-20 12:04:53 PM  

InfrasonicTom: And no one thought to timelapse that?


The video will be posted once the move and hookup is done around the 27th. The most interesting part of the move is one end is being moved more than the other, a first for a structure this big.
 
2013-01-20 12:45:08 PM  
natazha

The most interesting part of the move is one end is being moved more than the other, a first for a structure this big.

Going on fuzzy memories, and too lazy to search the 'tubes for citations, I'm going with "no" on that. A multi-story brick office building (in Philadelphia, I think) was raised off its foundation and moved to a new location on the adjacent side street to make way for a newer building. This was done without disrupting services during the move, and a ninety degree rotation is definitely moving one end more than the other.

Also, another whole building was relocated (somewhere in Texas) a significant distance and had to cross a bridge to get to its new home. Both survived. A much more recent historic firehouse move wasn't so fortunate.

Happy hunting.
 
2013-01-20 12:53:55 PM  

Larva Lump: natazha

The most interesting part of the move is one end is being moved more than the other, a first for a structure this big.

Going on fuzzy memories, and too lazy to search the 'tubes for citations, I'm going with "no" on that. A multi-story brick office building (in Philadelphia, I think) was raised off its foundation and moved to a new location on the adjacent side street to make way for a newer building. This was done without disrupting services during the move, and a ninety degree rotation is definitely moving one end more than the other.

Also, another whole building was relocated (somewhere in Texas) a significant distance and had to cross a bridge to get to its new home. Both survived. A much more recent historic firehouse move wasn't so fortunate.

Happy hunting.


I'm going to go with "yes." I'll be your office building weighed less than 3500 tons, and I'll also bet it's less than 1100 ft long.

"First for a structure this size."
 
2013-01-20 01:04:31 PM  
blame the modmins for no time-lapse....I submitted this with a better headline and an article with time-lapse included
 
2013-01-20 01:07:11 PM  
....although the Fox timelapse is way better.
 
2013-01-20 01:26:13 PM  

AngryDragon: Unimpressed


Yes, sometimes I'd like to show the builders of ancient civilisations what we are capable of today. And then I'd like to show them how durable they built compared to todays constructions.
 
2013-01-20 01:36:29 PM  

InfrasonicTom: And no one thought to timelapse that?


There is a construction cam that does daily, weekly and monthly time lapses all day every day.
 
2013-01-20 01:38:00 PM  

Larva Lump: natazha

The most interesting part of the move is one end is being moved more than the other, a first for a structure this big.

Going on fuzzy memories, and too lazy to search the 'tubes for citations, I'm going with "no" on that. A multi-story brick office building (in Philadelphia, I think) was raised off its foundation and moved to a new location on the adjacent side street to make way for a newer building. This was done without disrupting services during the move, and a ninety degree rotation is definitely moving one end more than the other.

Also, another whole building was relocated (somewhere in Texas) a significant distance and had to cross a bridge to get to its new home. Both survived. A much more recent historic firehouse move wasn't so fortunate.

Happy hunting.


If it was crossing a bridge, it might not have been as big as a bridge.
 
2013-01-20 01:43:24 PM  
img90.imageshack.us

DA BRIDGE IZ OOOOOUUUUUUUUUUWWWWWWWT!
 
2013-01-20 01:46:04 PM  
Awesome timelapse of a 2 storey 100 year old brick tavern being moved to make way for a motorway extension - and then put back again

Link
 
2013-01-20 02:07:38 PM  
Pretty cool. Will I drive over it? Not a chance in hell.
 
2013-01-20 02:54:16 PM  
Point being: a lot of big things have been moved significant distances. This bridge move wasn't extraordinary.

The Cudecom Building move, at a former-record-holding 8000 metric tons (includes moving structure) was dwarfed by the Fu Gang move at 15,140 tons. For weight and distance this bridge move was practically routine, and the length and realignment didn't push any engineering boundaries.

Still, a nicely executed project and fun to watch.
 
2013-01-20 03:50:58 PM  
22 pictures and 20 of them had this for a caption.

"The Sellwood Bridge moved from its former permanent supports to temporary supports Saturday so a new bridge can be constructed in its place across the Willamette River."

Do they have to pay scale or something to caption writers?
 
das
2013-01-20 06:12:22 PM  
Will the new bridge be mobile in 87 years????
 
2013-01-20 08:53:27 PM  
nice, can't wait to not compulsively take my seat belt off when crossing.
 
2013-01-21 12:45:59 AM  
If you see scooter lady from photo #2 crossing the bridge, run the other direction. It was never engineered for that sort of stress.
 
2013-01-21 12:54:58 AM  
If they'd aligned it as they built it the first time, they wouldn't have had to move it 60 feet....


/LOL
 
2013-01-21 01:44:30 AM  
Oregon is a little late to the game. Washington state had moving bridges 70 years ago.
www.technologystudent.com
 
2013-01-21 02:00:25 AM  
Been driving past this construction every week for the past month.

getting a kick and all that
 
2013-01-23 10:15:39 PM  
How not to move a bridge sideways.

img.aktualne.centrum.cz
 
Displayed 27 of 27 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter








In Other Media
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report