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(MSNBC)   Want to taste some 128-year-old Scotch? Then grab some tumblers and a 2-liter of Mountain Dew and head to Antarctica   (msnbc.msn.com) divider line 40
    More: Cool, Antarctica, Sir Ernest Shackleton, South Pole, grabs, taste, Cape Royds  
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4818 clicks; posted to Geek » on 20 Jan 2013 at 5:00 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-20 01:33:52 AM
Might as well mix it with Mountain Dew, it was bottled 128 years ago, not aged 128 years.
 
2013-01-20 01:52:12 AM
What is the Mountain Dew for? Antartica has everything you need (if desired) for your scotch: ice.
 
2013-01-20 01:53:47 AM
Shackelton Shackleton.

Pet peeev.
 
2013-01-20 03:12:09 AM
Quantity > quality.

I'll happily drink Maker's Mark instead.
 
2013-01-20 05:04:27 AM

Gig103: Might as well mix it with Mountain Dew, it was bottled 128 years ago, not aged 128 years.


Where is anyone saying it was aged 128 years?

FTFA Bottled in 1898 after the blend was aged 15 years

Oh wait - no where.
 
2013-01-20 05:05:21 AM

Bucky Katt: What is the Mountain Dew for? Antartica has everything you need (if desired) for your scotch: ice.


1-media-cdn.foolz.us
 
2013-01-20 05:29:24 AM
If they didn't open any of it where was the "aroma" coming from? Is this like "cops bust man with ounce of coke, all 14 grams were checked in as evidence to be used during the trial" deals?
 
2013-01-20 06:03:15 AM
Scott Scotch of the Antarctic
 
2013-01-20 06:16:45 AM
Shackleton's hut on Google Street View. And for extra measure, here's Scott's.

It's a quiet neighbourhood.
 
2013-01-20 06:22:54 AM

gingerjet: Oh wait - no where.


sitting in a bottle counts as aging, it's bottle aging as opposed to barrel/cask aging, but it still counts.
 
2013-01-20 07:54:43 AM
Was this a blend or single malt? Because ima snob.
 
2013-01-20 08:03:41 AM

WhyteRaven74: gingerjet: Oh wait - no where.

sitting in a bottle counts as aging, it's bottle aging as opposed to barrel/cask aging, but it still counts.


No. No it doesn't. It's not wine.
 
2013-01-20 08:44:16 AM

Metastatic Capricorn: No. No it doesn't. It's not wine.


The character of a scotch sitting in a bottle for 100 years will be quite difference from a scotch that was bottled a month ago.
 
2013-01-20 09:08:57 AM

Metastatic Capricorn: WhyteRaven74: gingerjet: Oh wait - no where.

sitting in a bottle counts as aging, it's bottle aging as opposed to barrel/cask aging, but it still counts.

No. No it doesn't. It's not wine.


This.
 
2013-01-20 09:17:44 AM

LordOfThePings: Shackelton Shackleton.

Pet peeev.


Wait until you meet my buddy PendELton.
 
2013-01-20 09:23:21 AM

WhyteRaven74: Metastatic Capricorn: No. No it doesn't. It's not wine.

The character of a scotch sitting in a bottle for 100 years will be quite difference from a scotch that was bottled a month ago.


Nope. Hard liquor, unlike wine, is stable in the bottle. The reason some people love to dig up old whiskeys and try them is not because they change flavor, it's because they stay exactly the same, and it's cool to taste something exactly as your grandfather might have tasted.

I've never had anything 100 years old, but I've had stuff that was sitting in a bottle for nearly as long as I've been alive (grandparent's stock that got stashed somewhere when my grandfather died and grandmother moved to a retirement home). Tastes pretty much the same as stuff bottled today, with a few minor changes in a spirit or two due to recipe or proof changes.

There's a reason scotch people were tripping over themselves to sample this stuff when they first dug it up. It's because they knew it would be a perfectly preserved example of how scotches were styled back then, which is something we apparently have very little information on. And of course, they'll now sell you a more or less perfect replica if you'd like.
 
2013-01-20 09:28:37 AM
Just bought a bottle of Dalwhinnie 15 to celebrate my new job, so I'm getting a kick out of the comments in this thread.

And the scales fell from my eyes...

/Highland boy
//Speyside too
///Maybe I'll understand the appeal of Islay in a couple decades
 
2013-01-20 09:33:19 AM

residentgeek: ///Maybe I'll understand the appeal of Islay in a couple decades


I'm in my mid 20's and I can't get enough of Islay. The peatier and smokier, the better. Liking whiskey that isn't boring isn't a function of age.

\I kid, I like a good speyside too.
\\But a choice between Laphroaig vs. Glenwhatever? That's an easy one.
 
2013-01-20 09:43:16 AM

cptjeff: residentgeek: ///Maybe I'll understand the appeal of Islay in a couple decades

I'm in my mid 20's and I can't get enough of Islay. The peatier and smokier, the better. Liking whiskey that isn't boring isn't a function of age.

\I kid, I like a good speyside too.
\\But a choice between Laphroaig vs. Glenwhatever? That's an easy one.


I'll grant you the Glenwhatever, that's pretty accurate. (Though its accessibility is the reason Glenfiddich has made a name for itself.) But I'm not partial to drinking a campfire. I dunno, it's like overly-hopped beers such as come out of the northwest--a lack of balance.

I had a glass of Oban once, years ago, and I don't recall it doing me a poor turn. Might be my next bottle.
 
2013-01-20 10:08:40 AM
cptjeff: You might also enjoy Ardbeg. And Russian Caravan tea.
 
2013-01-20 10:12:30 AM

residentgeek: cptjeff: residentgeek: ///Maybe I'll understand the appeal of Islay in a couple decades

I'm in my mid 20's and I can't get enough of Islay. The peatier and smokier, the better. Liking whiskey that isn't boring isn't a function of age.

\I kid, I like a good speyside too.
\\But a choice between Laphroaig vs. Glenwhatever? That's an easy one.

I'll grant you the Glenwhatever, that's pretty accurate. (Though its accessibility is the reason Glenfiddich has made a name for itself.) But I'm not partial to drinking a campfire. I dunno, it's like overly-hopped beers such as come out of the northwest--a lack of balance.

I had a glass of Oban once, years ago, and I don't recall it doing me a poor turn. Might be my next bottle.


And I want to drink a campfire. I grew up camping. I love the smell of wood smoke. Mix it with the woods after a rain, and you have the smell of heaven. Put that into whiskey and well, you're speaking my language.

Actually, with the hearty dose of sea air, the image that comes to mind to describe islays as more the taste of a docks in the age of sail. Pitch and tar being burned and melted to be hammered into ropes, sea, fruits and spices being unloaded from far off lands. The pitch and tar image better describe some of the chemically tastes in there that some people hate than a campfire does, IMO.
 
2013-01-20 10:17:02 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: cptjeff: You might also enjoy Ardbeg. And Russian Caravan tea.


The trouble is that I can't afford as much nice scotch as I want to drink. Mental note made however.

Way ahead of you on the tea, though, I'm never short of Lapsang souchong.
 
2013-01-20 10:43:41 AM
No no...not Mountain Dew;  Hawaiian Punch.

You think I'm kidding? Not at all.

Nothing - and I mean  nothing- tastes as good as a 50/50 mixer of Macallan 30 and this stuff:

i.walmartimages.com

Please note: I'm a bit of a Scotch snob. Jonnie Walker Blue is NOT a valid substitute. Nor are any of those crap bourbons you idiot Americans blather on about. If you don't want the Macallan, you can use Glenlivet (NOT Glenfiddich!!!) but that is it.
 
2013-01-20 10:45:27 AM

cptjeff: Quantum Apostrophe: cptjeff: You might also enjoy Ardbeg. And Russian Caravan tea.

The trouble is that I can't afford as much nice scotch as I want to drink. Mental note made however.

Way ahead of you on the tea, though, I'm never short of Lapsang souchong.


Yeah, I don't really see the difference between Lapsang Souchong and Russian Caravan. It's also important to get the stuff from an actual tea shop, not just someone who happens to have tea jars in his shop.

Here in Montreal I get my tea from a place called Marie The on Parc Ave. Excellent stuff.

I'm surprised scotch is expensive for you, I can't see it getting much more expensive than in The People's Republic of Kebekistan and Taxes.
 
2013-01-20 11:02:12 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: cptjeff: Quantum Apostrophe: cptjeff: You might also enjoy Ardbeg. And Russian Caravan tea.

The trouble is that I can't afford as much nice scotch as I want to drink. Mental note made however.

Way ahead of you on the tea, though, I'm never short of Lapsang souchong.

Yeah, I don't really see the difference between Lapsang Souchong and Russian Caravan. It's also important to get the stuff from an actual tea shop, not just someone who happens to have tea jars in his shop.

Here in Montreal I get my tea from a place called Marie The on Parc Ave. Excellent stuff.

I'm surprised scotch is expensive for you, I can't see it getting much more expensive than in The People's Republic of Kebekistan and Taxes.


Scotch is expensive for me because I'm poor, not because the prices are all that absurd. In fact, in DC, they're often downright reasonable.

As for the difference between teas, it's about the difference between a blended scotch and a single malt- Lapsang Souchong is the leaf that gives Russian Caravan its smoky character, but something like Russian Caravan has other leaves in the blend as well to give it other flavors.
 
2013-01-20 11:04:42 AM
I had drank much of a bottle of Johnny Walker Black label that was sitting in a friends parents basement since 1967 and it was VERY VERY different than today's black label. I don't care what anybody says about it not being able to change in the bottle it was very different!
 
2013-01-20 11:40:29 AM

Cretony38: I had drank much of a bottle of Johnny Walker Black label that was sitting in a friends parents basement since 1967 and it was VERY VERY different than today's black label. I don't care what anybody says about it not being able to change in the bottle it was very different!


Different, yes;  aged,no. Have to be in the barrel to barrel age. By definition.
 
2013-01-20 11:52:47 AM

Cretony38: I had drank much of a bottle of Johnny Walker Black label that was sitting in a friends parents basement since 1967 and it was VERY VERY different than today's black label. I don't care what anybody says about it not being able to change in the bottle it was very different!


That's not the scotch changing in the bottle. That's Johnny Walker changing the taste profile of their whiskey to appeal to changing tastes and/or a different demographic. Happens a lot more often than you think- cutting costs is often a big reason, too. Brands get bought and sold, and shifted in quality and price point to target various market segments. You might also get flavor changes when a new master blender comes in with a different idea of how the product should taste.

Despite what those commercials told you a few years back, Jack Daniels' "old number 7" isn't mysterious. It used to be aged for 7 years. Now it's a 4 year old Whiskey. They also cut the proof. Plenty more examples where that came from- if you look at the bottom shelf bourbons around today, most of those used to be respectable but lower performing brands. Than bigger names bought them out and repositioned them, since they had name recognition and followings already, which allows them to charge more money for the same bottom shelf whiskey then they could with a more generic brand.

Some brands make it a big point to remain consistent- Courvoisier maintains a library of brandies going back to Napoleonic times for the blenders to sniff or even sip tiny amounts of so they can ensure the current product stays in line with historical standards. Sometimes brands try to go back and replicate what they would have tasted like way back when- Laphroaig does that with their Quarter Cask. No whiskey survives from when the distillery was founded, so they took a guess, using smaller quarter casks and aging them in their oldest warehouse, right by the sea. It's an outstanding whiskey, but it is different from their standard 10y expression, which is also an outstanding dram.

I'm not surprised that the Johnny Walker was different. They strike me as a brand that wouldn't be too afraid of changing with the trends to remain fashionable. Which is fine, it's a mass market scotch blended to appeal to a wide range of people.
 
2013-01-20 11:54:23 AM

Cretony38: I had drank much of a bottle of Johnny Walker Black label that was sitting in a friends parents basement since 1967 and it was VERY VERY different than today's black label. I don't care what anybody says about it not being able to change in the bottle it was very different!


That's because they changed their process radically since then. It is different now because it was different then.

Link

/bonus: Mars colonies
 
2013-01-20 01:09:45 PM
Considering the very large population of Antarctica, I wonder if leehouse was in on this
 
2013-01-20 02:27:00 PM

whistleridge: Cretony38: I had drank much of a bottle of Johnny Walker Black label that was sitting in a friends parents basement since 1967 and it was VERY VERY different than today's black label. I don't care what anybody says about it not being able to change in the bottle it was very different!

Different, yes;  aged,no. Have to be in the barrel to barrel age. By definition.


I think that's the key. Bottling effectively freezes something like a whisky or scotch as is. Obviously there would be a huge difference between something produced 30 years ago and something produced today if just for the fact that the barrels would have been made from different lots of wood. However, I could see the taste changing on a bottle if it were not sealed properly.

That said, something like Vodka should taste exactly the same even if it was from a 100 year old bottle.
 
2013-01-20 02:53:57 PM
bminusblogs.files.wordpress.com

128 year-old Scotch? How does that compare to 60 year-old moonshine in an old Chevy at the bottom of a lake?
 
2013-01-20 03:06:02 PM

Bucky Katt: What is the Mountain Dew for? Antartica has everything you need (if desired) for your scotch: ice.


I like mine (The Glenlivet 12 year) around room temp.
 
2013-01-20 03:12:14 PM

Sultan Of Herf: Bucky Katt: What is the Mountain Dew for? Antartica has everything you need (if desired) for your scotch: ice.

I like mine (The Glenlivet 12 year) around room temp.


im a big whiskey rocks guy...chilled but no water.

/I also like my red wines cooler than standard serving temp.
 
2013-01-20 04:28:44 PM

kim jong-un: whistleridge: Cretony38: I had drank much of a bottle of Johnny Walker Black label that was sitting in a friends parents basement since 1967 and it was VERY VERY different than today's black label. I don't care what anybody says about it not being able to change in the bottle it was very different!

Different, yes;  aged,no. Have to be in the barrel to barrel age. By definition.

I think that's the key. Bottling effectively freezes something like a whisky or scotch as is. Obviously there would be a huge difference between something produced 30 years ago and something produced today if just for the fact that the barrels would have been made from different lots of wood. However, I could see the taste changing on a bottle if it were not sealed properly.

That said, something like Vodka should taste exactly the same even if it was from a 100 year old bottle.


Blends tend to vary in taste over the years as the single malts that are blended to form the taste can either alter the taste of their product, or simply cease to produce and are replaced by another product.
 
2013-01-20 04:32:40 PM

StrikitRich: [bminusblogs.files.wordpress.com image 250x200]

128 year-old Scotch? How does that compare to 60 year-old moonshine in an old Chevy at the bottom of a lake?


The Mountain Dew levels the playing field.
 
2013-01-20 08:59:44 PM

kim jong-un: Obviously there would be a huge difference between something produced 30 years ago and something produced today if just for the fact that the barrels would have been made from different lots of wood.


Missed this. No, they wouldn't, because that's what the blender does- even within whiskey of the same age there's tremendous variation from barrel to barrel. How a whiskey emerges from the barrel varies widely, even if they start out the same. The density of the wood, the depth of the char, the placement in the warehouse, what warehouse. The blender tastes every barrel on a regular basis to see how it's developing, and picks out a bunch with various different traits and blends them together to create the desired product. Single barrel whiskeys are becoming more popular, but they're not just random barrels- they're nice barrels that are picked out specifically because they came out balanced with no blending needed, and already roughly match the desired flavor profile.
 
2013-01-20 11:23:12 PM

StrikitRich: [bminusblogs.files.wordpress.com image 250x200]

128 year-old Scotch? How does that compare to 60 year-old moonshine in an old Chevy at the bottom of a lake?


The scotch won't blind you.
 
2013-01-21 12:12:05 AM
Gave a bottle of the limited release to a family member, they were pleased.
 
2013-01-21 08:40:37 AM
for the price, rich & rare is best.
 
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