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(New Zealand Herald)   Kim Dotcomm debuts new Mega Upload site. Fark: A year to the day since the botched FBI/NZ police raid that assassinated the last MegaUpload site   (nzherald.co.nz) divider line 64
    More: Interesting, FBI, Kim Dotcom, North Shore, file systems, The Establishment, Prime Minister John Key, New Zealand  
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3144 clicks; posted to Geek » on 19 Jan 2013 at 7:33 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-19 04:38:50 PM
Ha Ha Guy unavailable for comment.

/I, for one, welcome back our old, file-sharing overlord.
 
2013-01-19 04:38:53 PM
Good luck with that...
 
2013-01-19 05:00:30 PM
Distributed servers?  No problem, we have plenty of these:

i1269.photobucket.com

What Hollywood wants, Hollywood gets-- so long as the  bribes campaign contributions keep coming in.
 
2013-01-19 05:09:48 PM
The moment Hollywood gets paranoid again, cops will be knocking again.
 
2013-01-19 05:56:01 PM
eddievercetti: cops will be knocking again

What I understand, the cops are going to find finding the servers a little more difficult this time.
 
2013-01-19 06:03:46 PM
What's Grizz up to?
 
2013-01-19 07:39:25 PM
Well, he's got to do something to keep Mona in his life.
 
2013-01-19 07:51:06 PM

Sgygus: eddievercetti: cops will be knocking again

What I understand, the cops are going to find finding the servers a little more difficult this time.


The servers are on Dantooine
 
2013-01-19 07:53:42 PM
Finally, my, um, friends, can download mountains of Brazilian horsecack tranny porn again! I, um , they will be happy!
 
2013-01-19 08:24:51 PM

TheManofPA: Sgygus: eddievercetti: cops will be knocking again

What I understand, the cops are going to find finding the servers a little more difficult this time.

The servers are on Dantooine


There you see? She can be reasonable.
 
2013-01-19 08:31:02 PM
It's a good thing he can get back to facilitating illegal activity. The other sites that have tried to fill the gap have been kinda meh.
 
2013-01-19 08:47:09 PM
 
2013-01-19 09:01:06 PM
machoprogrammer: FTFA: "Dotcom has explained that he believes Vice President Joe Biden directed attorney Neil MacBride to target the site."

I believe you are a tranny lover who can't wait to get on all fours and take a 10 inch horsecack in the rear.
 
2013-01-19 09:02:05 PM
Kim Dotcom is a wierd dude but I kind of like him for it. I read a profile on wired I think.

Plus he likes cars. Cars are good.

/know nothing about file sharing blah blah blah.
 
2013-01-19 09:22:21 PM
As long as fat german dudes living in NZ get paid a couple of cents for that copy and the person who created the item being shared doesn't, the internet is working as normal.
 
2013-01-19 09:28:23 PM

narkor: As long as fat german dudes living in NZ get paid a couple of cents for that copy and the person who created the item being shared doesn't, the internet is working as normal.


Yeah, I agree. It is preposterous that media executives get paid so much money and the actual artists get paid little for it.
 
2013-01-19 09:37:03 PM
From the site:

What is MEGA User Controlled Encryption?

All files stored on MEGA are encrypted. All data transfers from and to MEGA are encrypted. And while most cloud storage providers can and do claim the same, MEGA is different - unlike the industry norm where the cloud storage provider holds the decryption key, with MEGA, you control the encryption, you hold the keys, and you decide who you grant or deny access to your files, without requiring any risky software installs. It's all happening in your web browser!


At an other point they state that they can by no means decrypt your files. This is something cloud storage providers should be doing from day 0.
 
2013-01-19 09:51:10 PM

traylor: From the site:

What is MEGA User Controlled Encryption?

All files stored on MEGA are encrypted. All data transfers from and to MEGA are encrypted. And while most cloud storage providers can and do claim the same, MEGA is different - unlike the industry norm where the cloud storage provider holds the decryption key, with MEGA, you control the encryption, you hold the keys, and you decide who you grant or deny access to your files, without requiring any risky software installs. It's all happening in your web browser!

At an other point they state that they can by no means decrypt your files. This is something cloud storage providers should be doing from day 0.


it's great. what they don't know can't be subpoenaed from them.
 
2013-01-19 09:51:54 PM

Dante87336: narkor: As long as fat german dudes living in NZ get paid a couple of cents for that copy and the person who created the item being shared doesn't, the internet is working as normal.

Yeah, I agree. It is preposterous that media executives get paid so much money and the actual artists get paid little for it.


This is a valid concern, but don't pretend you're engaging in some sort of moral crusade by pirating stuff.
 
2013-01-19 10:01:18 PM
It would be fun to just upload video of myself tapdancing badly in a robot costume. To ensure a huge bloated file size, I'd use no video or audio compression. Then I'd name it something sinister, daring people to try and crack the encryption.

Just sayin'...
 
2013-01-19 10:04:57 PM

GreenAdder: It would be fun to just upload video of myself tapdancing badly in a robot costume. To ensure a huge bloated file size, I'd use no video or audio compression. Then I'd name it something sinister, daring people to try and crack the encryption.

Just sayin'...


If you're going to do that, go with a RickRoll. Can't go wrong with the classics.
 
2013-01-19 10:10:35 PM
I tried going to the site but it was still down.

https://mega.co.nz/
 
2013-01-19 10:24:20 PM

jaylectricity: I tried going to the site but it was still down.

https://mega.co.nz/


Yeah, talk about a bomb. I was able to create an account about 6 hours ago but none of my attempts to upload a file has worked. This is why Google starts their new stuff with invitations. It keeps the service from being flooded on opening day.
 
2013-01-19 10:28:51 PM

nburghmatt: it's great. what they don't know can't be subpoenaed from them.


Aren't you protected from incriminating yourself? Or does the 5th amendment somehow not apply when computers are involved?
 
2013-01-19 10:37:06 PM

Gunther: nburghmatt: it's great. what they don't know can't be subpoenaed from them.

Aren't you protected from incriminating yourself? Or does the 5th amendment somehow not apply when computers are involved?


Servers can be seized, subpoenas can be issued to show the content of drives. With all of it encrypted, Mega can hand over all the drives they want and all the prosecutor will get is a bunch of unreadable encrypted data.
 
2013-01-19 10:41:16 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Finally, my, um, friends, can download mountains of Brazilian horsecack tranny porn again! I, um , they will be happy!


lol
 
2013-01-19 10:44:10 PM
The Obi-Wan Kenobi of P2P file sharing. I'm surprised he doesn't walk around as a "blue glowie" at this point.
 
2013-01-19 10:45:57 PM
I can't get anything to upload and the site itself is unreliable. I guess the servers are overloaded.
 
2013-01-19 10:51:50 PM
I can't wait for the MPAA and RIAA's fair and reasoned responses.
 
2013-01-19 10:51:57 PM

I May Be Crazy But...: If you're going to do that, go with a RickRoll. Can't go wrong with the classics.


The idea here is to completely avoid copyright violation or illegal activity. But me, in a homemade cardboard robot costume, dancing badly? That's my intellectual property and I can upload it wherever I choose.
 
2013-01-19 11:03:26 PM

Wolf_Blitzer: Dante87336: narkor: As long as fat german dudes living in NZ get paid a couple of cents for that copy and the person who created the item being shared doesn't, the internet is working as normal.

Yeah, I agree. It is preposterous that media executives get paid so much money and the actual artists get paid little for it.

This is a valid concern, but don't pretend you're engaging in some sort of moral crusade by pirating stuff.


This. If you want to do something about artists being screwed, go out and support an indie band's direct distribution or buy a concert video direct from Louie CK. As more artists see they can make money going direct to the consumer, it'll take more and more of that undeserved wealth out of the hands of the middlemen.
 
2013-01-19 11:26:20 PM

Gunther: nburghmatt: it's great. what they don't know can't be subpoenaed from them.

Aren't you protected from incriminating yourself? Or does the 5th amendment somehow not apply when computers are involved?


It's kind of a gray area where computers are concerned. I believe there have been a case or two where people who have had subpoenaed files on an encrypted hard drive and been ordered to turn over the encryption key. If they refused they could be held in contempt of court until they decided to comply. I believe they have to have a reasonable suspicion of exactly what files are encrypted before they can order you to decrypt it, but at least in some cases it's been decided that the 5th amendment doesn't apply there.
 
2013-01-19 11:28:35 PM

GreenAdder: I May Be Crazy But...: If you're going to do that, go with a RickRoll. Can't go wrong with the classics.

The idea here is to completely avoid copyright violation or illegal activity. But me, in a homemade cardboard robot costume, dancing badly? That's my intellectual property and I can upload it wherever I choose.


So long as the music you're dancing to is also entirely your own intellectual property (or at least is owned by someone who deliberately put it into the public domain and is neither used by Disney in any of their animated films nor shares its title with one), you'll be fine.

Buy a violin, a piano and a trumpet, record audio of yourself playing notes at random on each instrument, and combine those three audio feeds with your cardboard Gundam robot dance video.
 
2013-01-19 11:31:54 PM

King Something: So long as the music you're dancing to is also entirely your own intellectual property (or at least is owned by someone who deliberately put it into the public domain and is neither used by Disney in any of their animated films nor shares its title with one), you'll be fine.


Like if I just had a terrible loop playing over and over on my drum machine and/or Kaossilator? Done.
 
2013-01-19 11:36:50 PM
Good on him for not giving up. He never did anything illegal to begin with. Last year people gave him grief for running into the safe room but not locking the door or anyhing. What they fail to grasp is that he never intended to flee. He just wanted to be on camera so they couldn't murder him on the spot.
 
2013-01-20 12:16:48 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: I believe you are a tranny lover who can't wait to get on all fours and take a 10 inch horsecack in the rear.


And I believe you have Joe Biden's cock so far in your mouth that you can't see anything but his ballsack. Your point?
 
2013-01-20 12:24:18 AM
machoprogrammer: "And I believe you have Joe Biden's cock so far in your mouth that you can't see anything but his ballsack. Your point?"

Besides the one on your head?
 
2013-01-20 12:25:52 AM

Neondistraction: Gunther: nburghmatt: it's great. what they don't know can't be subpoenaed from them.

Aren't you protected from incriminating yourself? Or does the 5th amendment somehow not apply when computers are involved?

It's kind of a gray area where computers are concerned. I believe there have been a case or two where people who have had subpoenaed files on an encrypted hard drive and been ordered to turn over the encryption key. If they refused they could be held in contempt of court until they decided to comply. I believe they have to have a reasonable suspicion of exactly what files are encrypted before they can order you to decrypt it, but at least in some cases it's been decided that the 5th amendment doesn't apply there.


That's right - the 5th amendment doesn't apply to encryption keys. It's treated the same way as a physical search, that is to say, if the cops get a warrant to search your warehouse signed by a judge and they can't break into it because it's impervious, you have to turn over the keys or you are in contempt of court. Same thing applies to encrypted data, if the cops can't decrypt it and they have a search warrant for it, then you have to turn over the keys or go to jail.

What the changes made to megaupload really do is just make it harder for people to know what files are being stored without getting individual court orders for users of the service to have them reveal their keys. It doesn't actually protect his company all that much because depending on what jurisdiction his file servers are in, they can still be seized as evidence.
 
2013-01-20 12:40:15 AM

Dante87336: narkor: As long as fat german dudes living in NZ get paid a couple of cents for that copy and the person who created the item being shared doesn't, the internet is working as normal.

Yeah, I agree. It is preposterous that media executives get paid so much money and the actual artists get paid little for it.



Actually, it was probably Dotcom doing exactly that - setting up a system for artists to get paid - that brought the raid. Months before the raid he announced a new system where artists could use Megaupload to sell and distribute their music directly to their fans (cutting out middlemen such as record labels), and it was close to being open for business when the raid happened. It looks very much like the RIAA didn't like the sound of that - a technology which would potentially make them irrelevant - and pressured Washington to conduct the raid.
 
2013-01-20 01:29:46 AM

TwistedFark: Same thing applies to encrypted data, if the cops can't decrypt it and they have a search warrant for it, then you have to turn over the keys or go to jail.


Wait, seriously? You can't say "it's legal but private material unrelated to this case and I don't want you assholes to see it"?

That's... troubling. What's the point of encryption if merely having an encrypted file is grounds to be held until you decrypt it?
 
2013-01-20 01:39:17 AM

Gunther: TwistedFark: Same thing applies to encrypted data, if the cops can't decrypt it and they have a search warrant for it, then you have to turn over the keys or go to jail.

Wait, seriously? You can't say "it's legal but private material unrelated to this case and I don't want you assholes to see it"?

That's... troubling. What's the point of encryption if merely having an encrypted file is grounds to be held until you decrypt it?


The point of encryption is to not let unauthorized individuals steal your stuff. This is similar to a lock on your house. The lock is to keep people from stealing your stuff. However when the police come to your house with a search warrant they are now by definition authorized to enter your house and you are required to let them in. Similarly a search warrant of your files authorizes them to view your files and you are required to let them in. It's really very simple
 
2013-01-20 08:34:21 AM

brandent: Gunther: TwistedFark: Same thing applies to encrypted data, if the cops can't decrypt it and they have a search warrant for it, then you have to turn over the keys or go to jail.

Wait, seriously? You can't say "it's legal but private material unrelated to this case and I don't want you assholes to see it"?

That's... troubling. What's the point of encryption if merely having an encrypted file is grounds to be held until you decrypt it?

The point of encryption is to not let unauthorized individuals steal your stuff. This is similar to a lock on your house. The lock is to keep people from stealing your stuff. However when the police come to your house with a search warrant they are now by definition authorized to enter your house and you are required to let them in. Similarly a search warrant of your files authorizes them to view your files and you are required to let them in. It's really very simple


It's more of a leftover from the paper age.
Before, police could gain access to documents with a hammer and chisel. Now their access depends entirely on the user agreeing to their demands.

It puts you in the debacle of having to choose between serving time for obstruction or serving time for whatever evidence is in that file. They compensate by trying to make the penalty for obstruction into an indefinite sentence.

/It also makes an argument for allowing governments to use more coercive means.
/or mandating that all encryption systems leaves them a spare set of keys.
/the latter of these options will probably defeat the point of encryption in due time.
 
2013-01-20 10:04:41 AM

traylor: From the site:

What is MEGA User Controlled Encryption?

All files stored on MEGA are encrypted. All data transfers from and to MEGA are encrypted. And while most cloud storage providers can and do claim the same, MEGA is different - unlike the industry norm where the cloud storage provider holds the decryption key, with MEGA, you control the encryption, you hold the keys, and you decide who you grant or deny access to your files, without requiring any risky software installs. It's all happening in your web browser!

At an other point they state that they can by no means decrypt your files. This is something cloud storage providers should be doing from day 0.


Most cloud services don't need to 'encrypt' data for dubiously legal means, which means they don't need to spend the cash for more processor cycles for encryption protocols/algorythms/right wordhere.

So they don't. But mega is entirely different in purpose and execution, so they do.
 
2013-01-20 10:57:36 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: machoprogrammer: "And I believe you have Joe Biden's cock so far in your mouth that you can't see anything but his ballsack. Your point?"

Besides the one on your head?


Boy, that escalated quickly.

*sips a High Life*

/the champagne of beers
 
2013-01-20 11:46:38 AM

mongbiohazard: Dante87336: narkor: As long as fat german dudes living in NZ get paid a couple of cents for that copy and the person who created the item being shared doesn't, the internet is working as normal.

Yeah, I agree. It is preposterous that media executives get paid so much money and the actual artists get paid little for it.


Actually, it was probably Dotcom doing exactly that - setting up a system for artists to get paid - that brought the raid. Months before the raid he announced a new system where artists could use Megaupload to sell and distribute their music directly to their fans (cutting out middlemen such as record labels), and it was close to being open for business when the raid happened. It looks very much like the RIAA didn't like the sound of that - a technology which would potentially make them irrelevant - and pressured Washington to conduct the raid.


Distribution hasn't been an issue for 20 years.
The hard part was building up the critical mass so an artist can make a living (or getting rich) by selling their own stuff.

Louis CK was able to make a ton of money off his self produced downloadable video because he has a TV show on Fox, had a TV show on HBO, was on Parks & Rec, etc, etc, etc...

The best way to look at media companies are like Angel and Venture Capital investors. They provide the capital, the skills and the connections for a small band to become a big, famous band. Or they provide a movie with a budget and 2,000 screens and a profile on Entertainment Tonight.

Every hit subsidizes dozes of failed Albums/TV shows/books/movies.

And artists are still able to artistically and financially succeed, Loius CK made the deal to shoot his TV show with a tiny budget in return for creative freedom and ownership. IIRC his budget is 250K an episode. Which isn't even what the blond girl on BBT gets paid per episode on the BBT.
 
2013-01-20 12:42:39 PM

Komplex: Distribution hasn't been an issue for 20 years.



lolwut? 20 years ago we were buying CD's from record stores. Now people have swiftly been migrating to digital distribution and record stores are largely a thing of the past - like Motophoto.

The content distribution platform of the future for music has hardly been decided. Sure the technology will be online and digital, but the particular avenue is still up in the air. iTunes was pretty much the only game in town for a while, now we have Amazon's online store, Spotify, Google Play, etc.. But Dotcom's was supposed to get the artist a bigger cut of the profits then other avenues, and leave the labels completely out. The record industry did NOT like that as it had the potential to erase them from the equation and was being started by an individual who was hostile to them and not a company they could convince to keep including them in the profit stream, anachronistically.
 
2013-01-20 12:47:57 PM

GreenAdder: I May Be Crazy But...: If you're going to do that, go with a RickRoll. Can't go wrong with the classics.

The idea here is to completely avoid copyright violation or illegal activity. But me, in a homemade cardboard robot costume, dancing badly? That's my intellectual property and I can upload it wherever I choose.


In the lime wire days,my band would upload offensive songs but call them back street boys or whatever was popular at the time.
 
2013-01-20 12:49:35 PM
Biden will make sure Hollywood wins and you lose.
 
2013-01-20 01:23:17 PM
Blaming "Hollywood Joe" Biden again are we?

He deserves it.

Looks like a nice service though.  I heard they were expecting a million users, but will have to bump that up because they're halfway there already.  Amazing.
 
2013-01-20 02:45:24 PM

kroonermanblack: Most cloud services don't need to 'encrypt' data for dubiously legal means, which means they don't need to spend the cash for more processor cycles for encryption protocols/algorythms/right wordhere.

So they don't. But mega is entirely different in purpose and execution, so they do.


I suppose that's one way of looking at it. Another is to say other services don't encrypt data because of cost much to the detriment of their users. They don't need to encrypt anything for "dubious" legal reasons, they should do it to provide secure hosting for their users. SpiderOak is a good example of a hosted storage service that has a high security rating simply for the fact that they encrypt by default. Encrypted files/accounts are good for users, full stop. They data is kept private to only those they share their key with.

Dropbox, Skydrive, et al don't do it because they don't want to spend the money. Not because they don't promote non-legal uses for their account. I can upload and share all manner of copyright material in Dropbox, Skydrive, and Google Drive and share it with everyone. And people do this. A lot. But the FBI isn't raiding Google or Microsoft's servers.
 
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