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(Baltimore Sun)   Counties' plan to end homelessness starts with evicting families out of their homes   (baltimoresun.com) divider line 65
    More: Ironic, county officials, mobile home parks, Beechcrest, Howard County, homeless, Econo Lodge, families, county  
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7180 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Jan 2013 at 7:41 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-19 09:54:48 PM
California... super cool to the homeless.
 
2013-01-19 09:57:43 PM

Rik01: My city, during it's period of rapid growth some years ago, bought out a small mobile home park consisting of about 10 units. Nestled in the woods off the main highway, it was a comfortable little place surrounded by wild woods and had been there for decades. No frills. The main road into the place was dirt. No clubhouse, no rec center and the majority of the units used wells for water.

It was comfortably kept by the residents, most of which had lived there for years. They weren't happy about having to relocate, but no one really gave a shiat about maybe 20 people. Not when the land values in the area quadrupled nearly over night.

The land three miles east of them had been sold and developed into a mall, a strip plaza, a Walmart, Sam's, a couple of very high end lawyers offices, an exclusive community and a high end 'retirement' home.

Basically, these folks were toast.

Over two years, the park emptied out, until finially there was one solitary mobile home there and one day, it was gone.

That was about three years ago. The place is still undeveloped, especially since the housing bubble burst. All that's there now are the cement pads and capped well heads with weeds taking over the previously small, nicely kept lawns.

The only winner was the previous owner of the land.

It had been a nice little place. Comfortable, unlike the major mobile home parks in the area with mandatory park groomed lawns, paved roads, rec centers, club houses and rules upon rules to follow.

Actually, I kind of miss it.

Decades ago, my city passed laws concerning mobile homes. You could no longer buy an acre of land and put one in place. You had to have a minimum of 5 acres -- unless you were building a mobile home park. Then you could cram as many in as possible.
But, back then, an acre of land was about $5000. Today an undeveloped acre starts at about $80,000.


Manahawkin, NJ?
 
2013-01-19 10:07:22 PM

phrawgh: PsiChick: phrawgh: smitty04: The chronically homeless will always be living on the streets, it is a mental issue their choice.

/ftfy

Erm, they never actually  chose to have the voices in their heads telling them it's a great idea to wander off and look for the Lost Orb of Phantasia.

If you chose not to decide, you still have made a choice.


...phrawgh, they're mentally ill based on neurobiology. They have about as much choice in that as they have in their skin color. If they can't afford medications, then what the hell is going to help them?
 
2013-01-19 10:09:22 PM
Tsk. Just one more example of the ravages and horribleness of Capitalism, Free Markets, and the obsessive fetish over the protection of private property rights. WHEN oh when will compassionate Socialism be adopted?

Released view of the approved scale model of the proposed apartment complex:

www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org
 
2013-01-19 10:16:49 PM

Loren: In other words, the mobile home park was given to them as a bribe to get what else the developer wanted.


Or some such.
 
2013-01-19 10:20:05 PM

simplicimus: RedPhoenix122: Residents living in and around North Laurel's Beechcrest Mobile Home Park lashed out at Howard County officials Thursday, saying they were not properly notified of the county's plans to build an apartment complex for the chronically homeless.

There's no point in acting surprised about it. All the planning charts and demolition orders have been on display at the local planning department.

Hitchhiker Guide's reference?


I see my work here is done.

/North Laurel resident
//Not Beechcrest
 
2013-01-19 10:42:00 PM
So they got no destination to hold?
 
2013-01-19 10:50:31 PM

5monkeys: Rik01: My city, during it's period of rapid growth some years ago, bought out a small mobile home park consisting of about 10 units. Nestled in the woods off the main highway, it was a comfortable little place surrounded by wild woods and had been there for decades. No frills. The main road into the place was dirt. No clubhouse, no rec center and the majority of the units used wells for water.

It was comfortably kept by the residents, most of which had lived there for years. They weren't happy about having to relocate, but no one really gave a shiat about maybe 20 people. Not when the land values in the area quadrupled nearly over night.

The land three miles east of them had been sold and developed into a mall, a strip plaza, a Walmart, Sam's, a couple of very high end lawyers offices, an exclusive community and a high end 'retirement' home.

Basically, these folks were toast.

Over two years, the park emptied out, until finially there was one solitary mobile home there and one day, it was gone.

That was about three years ago. The place is still undeveloped, especially since the housing bubble burst. All that's there now are the cement pads and capped well heads with weeds taking over the previously small, nicely kept lawns.

The only winner was the previous owner of the land.

It had been a nice little place. Comfortable, unlike the major mobile home parks in the area with mandatory park groomed lawns, paved roads, rec centers, club houses and rules upon rules to follow.

Actually, I kind of miss it.

Decades ago, my city passed laws concerning mobile homes. You could no longer buy an acre of land and put one in place. You had to have a minimum of 5 acres -- unless you were building a mobile home park. Then you could cram as many in as possible.
But, back then, an acre of land was about $5000. Today an undeveloped acre starts at about $80,000.

Manahawkin, NJ?


I suppose we just have to trust in the Lord.
 
2013-01-19 11:11:57 PM
Subby, how many counties? Shouldn't it be county's?
 
2013-01-19 11:24:33 PM
Who will take it from you? We will. And who are we? We are Volunteers of America.
 
2013-01-20 12:26:42 AM
I hate the homeless


ness problem that plagues this city.

/damn you tiny cue cards
 
2013-01-20 03:52:50 AM
It's a mobile home park. It's not a cardboard box, but it's close.
 
2013-01-20 08:28:11 AM

trappedspirit: It's a mobile home park. It's not a cardboard box, but it's close.


This. Trailer parks usually house the chronically homeless. They are full of people who get evicted a lot and find a new trailer park.

The first place I stayed on my own was a trailer like in this park. The rent was week to week lease, so one day they decided they didn't like me and just dropped off a 'get out' slip. I had a week to find a new place. That was a stressful week that will either make or break you. I bounced up to a one bedroom apartment within walking distance to work. From there, I now have my house.

Some of the folks I met in the park felt real house owners were suckers for paying so much more than $2000 for their home. We had a lot of wind last night, I did not think 'I wish I was still in a trailer'.
 
2013-01-20 01:33:27 PM
I've lived in a couple of trailer parks and never owned a trailer. Always rented. I don't presume to know about Maryland, but here in S. Texas they are mainly occupied by people who don't quite have the money to rent a real apartment or house. Rents in SA are pretty crazy; there are a lot of people who can't afford $900/mo for a house or even $725 for an apartment in one of the nicer complexes. Enter trailer parks. Anywhere from $450 - $600/month and you're not on the side of town everyone's getting shot at. There's some Section 8, but by & large they house the working poor; folks who would be at high risk of becoming homeless without these places.

I hope there's somewhere in the county with comparable rents these people can get into, and that the relocation assistance will at least cover security and utility deposits, but I wouldn't hold my breath.
 
2013-01-20 01:36:14 PM
We live in a mobile home. That's a cave that... that goes places. Only we never went anyplace.

/probably not obscure
 
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