If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Slate)   My God. It really *is* full of stars   (slate.com) divider line 54
    More: Cool, Milky Way Galaxy, stars  
•       •       •

9347 clicks; posted to Geek » on 19 Jan 2013 at 1:11 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



54 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2013-01-19 11:44:30 AM
img163.imageshack.us
 
2013-01-19 12:02:05 PM
Someone plug in a piece of fairy cake.
 
2013-01-19 12:16:55 PM
That is super amazing.  Sliding through the image it seems that dark spots are the places that are out of place.  All these stars, but why should it be dark over here.  Is there something in the way?  Was there a big explosion?  Is that the star suburbs?  Rural galactic property?
 
2013-01-19 01:16:04 PM

IronTom: That is super amazing.  Sliding through the image it seems that dark spots are the places that are out of place.  All these stars, but why should it be dark over here.  Is there something in the way?  Was there a big explosion?  Is that the star suburbs?  Rural galactic property?


The dark areas are dust that is blocking out the light of the starts in the background. If you notice, there are larger (meaning closer) stars in front of the dust clouds as well.
 
2013-01-19 01:23:08 PM
You probably think that's a lot of stars, but that's just peanuts to space.
 
2013-01-19 01:35:06 PM
true beauty...
 
2013-01-19 01:37:11 PM
"To coinborrow a phrase: "My God, it's full of stars!""

Fixed that for ya, Phil...yer welcome. :^)
 
2013-01-19 01:43:42 PM
FTFA:

So, whatcha doing today?

Forget I asked, because after you click on this link, your day will be gone. Poof! Vanished, since you will find yourself buried in a magnificent, massive of the center of the Milky Way galaxy.

And when I say massive, I mean it's friggin' HUGE: 24,000 x 14,000 pixels! That's a total of a staggering 330 million pixels. It's a combination of three images (one each in red, green, and blue to produce a true-color final product), so it's actually-and I can't believe I'm typing this-the combination of a billion pixels of information.

Did I mention it's zoomable and scannable? No? Well, there goes your day.


"You Are Here."
 
2013-01-19 01:47:29 PM
And to think, any of those stars could contain life. Well, maybe not if they are that close together.
 
2013-01-19 01:51:27 PM
In before someone mentions God.
 
2013-01-19 02:04:59 PM
brain.

melt.
 
2013-01-19 02:16:13 PM
Whelp, looks like today will be spent watching Cosmos. Thanks subby.
 
2013-01-19 02:44:20 PM
a.tgcdn.net
 
2013-01-19 02:52:24 PM
Why do sites like this (the linked one with the full image) always look like they were made in 1992?

If you can program and debug a custom telescope array, I would imagine you could handle a little html/css.
 
2013-01-19 02:52:57 PM
Swiper! No Swiping!
edamomie.files.wordpress.com

/Oh, maaaan.
 
2013-01-19 02:53:39 PM
Which part of that is the Sea of Fire? You know... the area that Flash, Dale and Dr.Zarkov are pulled through safely to reach the planet Mongo?
 
2013-01-19 02:54:50 PM

IronTom: That is super amazing.  Sliding through the image it seems that dark spots are the places that are out of place.  All these stars, but why should it be dark over here.  Is there something in the way?  Was there a big explosion?  Is that the star suburbs?  Rural galactic property?


90-pound-weakling stars.
 
2013-01-19 02:57:58 PM
My interest in astronomy has lately been focused on the outliers -- rogue planets and stars located in the Milky Way's halo. This is awesome in its own way, though.

I wonder what the planets are like in there. The stars are close enough together that with a few exceptions hovering very close to the stars themselves, the galaxy's core is probably one giant pinball machine.
 
2013-01-19 03:05:10 PM
Wow. I wonder what the night sky would look like on a planet in such a dense stellar neighborhood.
 
2013-01-19 03:17:10 PM

Slow of Wit: Wow. I wonder what the night sky would look like on a planet in such a dense stellar neighborhood.


I bet it would look awesome. Probably peppered with white dots. I would imagine even though those stars appear close, they are still probably a few light years apart (I have no basis for this, just a hunch)
 
2013-01-19 03:17:32 PM
My whole day...gone. Poof!

I had no idea my day was only 35 seconds long.
 
2013-01-19 03:22:46 PM

machoprogrammer: Slow of Wit: Wow. I wonder what the night sky would look like on a planet in such a dense stellar neighborhood.

I bet it would look awesome. Probably peppered with white dots. I would imagine even though those stars appear close, they are still probably a few light years apart (I have no basis for this, just a hunch)


If you can see a smidge of space between the stars, they are definitely light-years apart, at the scale of the picture.
 
2013-01-19 03:25:10 PM

Slow of Wit: Wow. I wonder what the night sky would look like on a planet in such a dense stellar neighborhood.


This is gonna sound like a cop-out but it's rather relative since "look" depends in large part on how your eyes adjust. If it was blinding, your pupils would just constrict, and see less in the process.

Setting aside issues with the planet staying bound to its mother star, I'd say most of the night sky wouldn't look dramatically different, just brighter. The light of the Milky Way is bright enough to cast a shadow in remote areas, but it's completely washed out in the suburbs. In "dark" skies near the core your eyes would adjust; the difference being it would illuminate your surroundings much better -- you probably wouldn't need a flashlight to get around. Meanwhile, even urban areas could probably see thousand of stars, many visible even in daylight. The core might shine as bright as the full moon.
 
2013-01-19 05:45:28 PM
img15.imageshack.us
Fark ton of sun.
 
2013-01-19 06:26:53 PM

Stone Meadow: "To coinborrow a phrase: "My God, it's full of stars!""

Fixed that for ya, Phil...yer welcome. :^)


media.skateboard.com.au
 
2013-01-19 06:40:57 PM
Sometimes I sit around and think --Gee, I wonder why we haven't run into any other life in the universe yet? and then I see stuff like this and think -- oh yeah, that's why.
 
2013-01-19 06:49:15 PM

The Bad Astronomer: Stone Meadow: "To coinborrow a phrase: "My God, it's full of stars!""

Fixed that for ya, Phil...yer welcome. :^)

[media.skateboard.com.au image 452x339]


I've just picked up a fault in the Sarcasm unit. It's going to go 100% failure in 72 hours
 
2013-01-19 07:42:05 PM
So what was the location of that Collector base again?
 
2013-01-19 08:14:36 PM
I feel pretty insignificant relative to other people on this continent on earth. Looking at that picture there are no words to describe how meaningless my worries are. I'm a speck of dust on a speck of dust on a speck of dust ad infinitum.
 
2013-01-19 08:34:10 PM

The Bad Astronomer: Stone Meadow: "To coinborrow a phrase: "My God, it's full of stars!""

Fixed that for ya, Phil...yer welcome. :^)

[thatsthejoke.jpg]

Slate has a sense of humor? Who knew? ;^)

 
2013-01-19 08:34:27 PM
4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-01-19 08:41:23 PM
TY, subby.
 
2013-01-19 09:19:19 PM
Slowly watch the tide turn
Circle years, we could learn
There are only stars that are burning


- family, 1971
 
2013-01-19 09:23:59 PM
H to He, Who Am The Only One
Link
 
2013-01-19 10:19:39 PM

MayoSlather: I feel pretty insignificant relative to other people on this continent on earth. Looking at that picture there are no words to describe how meaningless my worries are. I'm a speck of dust on a speck of dust on a speck of dust ad infinitum.


For what it's worth, the imagination is not bound by anything. Whether or not you're religious, if you weren't fortunate enough to be wealthy and sentient to appreciate such a thought, the picture may as well not exist at all. I could say the same for any advanced civilization that may be out there, but without sentience, why bother to have a universe?

Where this train of thought gets depressing is just how stunted most people's imaginations are -- humans, anyway. Creation myths are laughably retarded, and most modern-day imaginations aren't much more ambitious. Most people are only vaguely aware the Moon and Sun are far away, and really don't contemplate existence much more than a hundred miles above the Earth's surface. Even everyone's favorite sci-fi/adventure franchises don't really extend the scope of their canon beyond a couple hundred boringly similar systems. Here's where some dertards gush about how unrestrained children's imaginations are, but even children likely understate the vast distances involved, and either way there's a difference between shouting out "a kazillion!" and actually have a sense of scale.
 
2013-01-19 10:45:42 PM

dragonchild: MayoSlather: I feel pretty insignificant relative to other people on this continent on earth. Looking at that picture there are no words to describe how meaningless my worries are. I'm a speck of dust on a speck of dust on a speck of dust ad infinitum.

For what it's worth, the imagination is not bound by anything. Whether or not you're religious, if you weren't fortunate enough to be wealthy and sentient to appreciate such a thought, the picture may as well not exist at all. I could say the same for any advanced civilization that may be out there, but without sentience, why bother to have a universe?

Where this train of thought gets depressing is just how stunted most people's imaginations are -- humans, anyway. Creation myths are laughably retarded, and most modern-day imaginations aren't much more ambitious. Most people are only vaguely aware the Moon and Sun are far away, and really don't contemplate existence much more than a hundred miles above the Earth's surface. Even everyone's favorite sci-fi/adventure franchises don't really extend the scope of their canon beyond a couple hundred boringly similar systems. Here's where some dertards gush about how unrestrained children's imaginations are, but even children likely understate the vast distances involved, and either way there's a difference between shouting out "a kazillion!" and actually have a sense of scale.


For that matter I have some idea of scale but really trying to comprehend that image of only a section of our own galaxy is beyond my ability. I'm at a loss to begin to fathom how vast the universe is, and that is awesome.
 
2013-01-19 11:02:46 PM
Their panorama of the whole Milky Way is also great. Link
 
2013-01-19 11:04:33 PM

Nem Wan: Their panorama of the whole Milky Way is also great. Link


Bonus: find the Andromeda galaxy in the same picture!
 
2013-01-19 11:28:24 PM

The Bad Astronomer: Stone Meadow: "To coinborrow a phrase: "My God, it's full of stars!""

Fixed that for ya, Phil...yer welcome. :^)


That was comedy gold.

/Nice article, btw
//Now I have to wash my face. I seem to have something brown on my nose.
 
2013-01-20 12:05:49 AM

MayoSlather: For that matter I have some idea of scale but really trying to comprehend that image of only a section of our own galaxy is beyond my ability. I'm at a loss to begin to fathom how vast the universe is, and that is awesome.


You're in good company. The Bad Astronomer's been doing this more passionately and much longer than any of us here, and it makes his brain hurt.

I try not to take it in all at once; it's too much for my brain.
 
2013-01-20 02:10:09 AM
cinedork.com
yup. it really is...
 
2013-01-20 08:45:17 AM

dragonchild: MayoSlather: For that matter I have some idea of scale but really trying to comprehend that image of only a section of our own galaxy is beyond my ability. I'm at a loss to begin to fathom how vast the universe is, and that is awesome.

You're in good company. The Bad Astronomer's been doing this more passionately and much longer than any of us here, and it makes his brain hurt.

I try not to take it in all at once; it's too much for my brain.


Any who ponder this have been there.
Link
 
2013-01-20 01:44:29 PM
Sentience is the Universe's way of looking at Itself.

Now think about this.

Where did the iron in the hemoglobin in your blood originally come from?
 
2013-01-20 02:45:45 PM

Kittypie070: Sentience is the Universe's way of looking at Itself.

Now think about this.

Where did the iron in the hemoglobin in your blood originally come from?


Dead hookers? At least for me it does.
 
2013-01-20 05:04:54 PM

mrlewish: Kittypie070: Sentience is the Universe's way of looking at Itself.

Now think about this.

Where did the iron in the hemoglobin in your blood originally come from?


Dead hookers? At least for me it does.


Yeah, something like that.

LMAO

/ancient exploded supergiant cores, actually
 
2013-01-20 06:54:20 PM

Kittypie070: /ancient exploded supergiant cores


It was consensual; they were asking for it.
 
2013-01-20 08:54:58 PM
Stellar asplodeygasms and dead hookers in the fridge, okeydokey :D
 
2013-01-21 03:44:39 AM

Krieghund: I seem to have something brown on my nose.


Whenever life gets you down, Mrs. Brown...
 
2013-01-21 03:56:12 AM

Kittypie070: Sentience is the Universe's way of looking at Itself.

Now think about this.

Where did the iron in the hemoglobin in your blood originally come from?


What are you implying mutha farker?  I never doped!
 
2013-01-21 03:56:50 AM
s3-ak.buzzfeed.com
 
2013-01-21 04:00:33 AM

dragonchild: My interest in astronomy has lately been focused on the outliers -- rogue planets and stars located in the Milky Way's halo. This is awesome in its own way, though.

I wonder what the planets are like in there. The stars are close enough together that with a few exceptions hovering very close to the stars themselves, the galaxy's core is probably one giant pinball machine.


A very dangerous pinball machine.
  Stars orbiting the black hole at the center of our galaxy  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EvuV3GdVaY4
 
2013-01-21 10:27:22 AM

SevenizGud: My whole day...gone. Poof!

I had no idea my day was only 35 seconds long.


Does QA have the day off or something?
 
2013-01-21 05:29:12 PM

dragonchild: Setting aside issues with the planet staying bound to its mother star, I'd say most of the night sky wouldn't look dramatically different, just brighter. The light of the Milky Way is bright enough to cast a shadow in remote areas, but it's completely washed out in the suburbs. In "dark" skies near the core your eyes would adjust; the difference being it would illuminate your surroundings much better -- you probably wouldn't need a flashlight to get around. Meanwhile, even urban areas could probably see thousand of stars, many visible even in daylight. The core might shine as bright as the full moon.


if a civilization could evolve in that chaos, they probably don't know how big the universe really is give that the local stars might wash the distant ones out much as our sun does.

Or maybe not.

Can the Hubble telescope see stars a few degrees off the Sun since there's no atmosphere to refract the sunlight?
 
2013-01-21 10:21:09 PM

relaxitsjustme: [s3-ak.buzzfeed.com image 355x236]


Ol' Bert, he looks like he's got hisself a really nice psychotic break going on there :D
 
Displayed 54 of 54 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report