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(Wisconsin State Journal)   Man in Bucky Badger hat robbed bank because he wants to go to prison for free medication and asked for $500 so he could pay off his $250,000 student loan debt   (host.madison.com) divider line 46
    More: Followup, Bucky Badger, student loans, UW-Madison, loans, robbery, prisons, medications, debts  
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5001 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Jan 2013 at 7:30 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-19 07:34:23 AM
See??! Colage are bad!
 
2013-01-19 07:35:14 AM
He has an English and Law degree and he's a custodian? Get a better Job, dude. Then you can pay your bills.
 
2013-01-19 07:38:43 AM
Smart man ... :/
 
2013-01-19 07:45:06 AM
Bootstrappy.
 
2013-01-19 07:53:25 AM
Dumbass.

Dude tried to get $500 thinking no-one would give a shiat. He was wrong. Now playing the planned 'I'm a bit of a retard, look at my hat' excuse.
 
2013-01-19 07:54:44 AM

abhorrent1: He has an English and Law degree and he's a custodian? Get a better Job, dude. Then you can pay your bills.


His Total Fark addiction did him in.
 
2013-01-19 08:01:53 AM
can't afford his prescribed medication
this is amerca under obamacare
 
2013-01-19 08:14:57 AM
Dude did the math:

50 years old, $250,000 debt, that's $12,500 per year (not counting interest) to pay it off by the time he's 70. Estimating a salary of $30,000 per year as a lead custodian, if he made the payments on time, in good faith, with the intention of being out of debt by the time he can still drive, he has $17,500 annually to live on. And that's barring any unforeseen stuff.

He saw that wasn't going to happen, and made the call. He'd rather be in prison than deal with that scenario.

/super quick and dirty math skills
 
2013-01-19 08:18:06 AM
Not news, retard gets a law degree
 
2013-01-19 08:18:32 AM

2and4: Dude did the math:

50 years old, $250,000 debt, that's $12,500 per year (not counting interest) to pay it off by the time he's 70. Estimating a salary of $30,000 per year as a lead custodian, if he made the payments on time, in good faith, with the intention of being out of debt by the time he can still drive, he has $17,500 annually to live on. And that's barring any unforeseen stuff.

He saw that wasn't going to happen, and made the call. He'd rather be in prison than deal with that scenario.

/super quick and dirty math skills


A good lawyer can bill a few hours to cover a student loan.
 
2013-01-19 08:25:46 AM

2and4: Dude did the math:

50 years old, $250,000 debt, that's $12,500 per year (not counting interest) to pay it off by the time he's 70. Estimating a salary of $30,000 per year as a lead custodian, if he made the payments on time, in good faith, with the intention of being out of debt by the time he can still drive, he has $17,500 annually to live on. And that's barring any unforeseen stuff.

He saw that wasn't going to happen, and made the call. He'd rather be in prison than deal with that scenario.

/super quick and dirty math skills


Then again, he could be on Wisconsin's BadgerCare which only allows him to make less than $10,800 a year in return for health care coverage for a chronic medical condition like...  Diabetes.
 
2013-01-19 08:32:43 AM

Shadi: this is amerca under obamacare


coming eventually to a hospital near you....


This bank robber sounds like he gets all his facts from Rush Limbaugh. How do you earn a law degree but be stupid enough to think this is a good plan?
 
2013-01-19 08:35:07 AM

edmo: Shadi: this is amerca under obamacare

coming eventually to a hospital near you....


This bank robber sounds like he gets all his facts from Rush Limbaugh. How do you earn a law degree but be stupid enough to think this is a good plan?


If they kick him out for being stupid, they don't get the lion's share of the $250,000.
 
2013-01-19 08:37:55 AM
Whoever said it in the original thread was right.....those hats WILL get you laid!
 
2013-01-19 08:46:44 AM

Vodka Zombie: 2and4: Dude did the math:

50 years old, $250,000 debt, that's $12,500 per year (not counting interest) to pay it off by the time he's 70. Estimating a salary of $30,000 per year as a lead custodian, if he made the payments on time, in good faith, with the intention of being out of debt by the time he can still drive, he has $17,500 annually to live on. And that's barring any unforeseen stuff.

He saw that wasn't going to happen, and made the call. He'd rather be in prison than deal with that scenario.

/super quick and dirty math skills

Then again, he could be on Wisconsin's BadgerCare which only allows him to make less than $10,800 a year in return for health care coverage for a chronic medical condition like...  Diabetes.


Not bad really.
 
2013-01-19 08:51:18 AM

2and4: Dude did the math:

50 years old, $250,000 debt, that's $12,500 per year (not counting interest) to pay it off by the time he's 70. Estimating a salary of $30,000 per year as a lead custodian, if he made the payments on time, in good faith, with the intention of being out of debt by the time he can still drive, he has $17,500 annually to live on. And that's barring any unforeseen stuff.

He saw that wasn't going to happen, and made the call. He'd rather be in prison than deal with that scenario.

/super quick and dirty math skills


Regular custodians at UW-Milwaukee start at $17/hr. He's gotta be in the $20's at least. That said, drugs like metformin and the like get expensive in a hurry.

/That does make me sound fat.
 
2013-01-19 08:56:32 AM
So remember, folks - dump batsh*t amounts of debt into degree you'll never use, eat poorly and pay huge amounts of money into medical care insurers for how crappy it makes your health, none of whom will likely never actually pay for sh*t. For freedom.™
 
2013-01-19 09:30:46 AM

2and4: Dude did the math:

50 years old, $250,000 debt, that's $12,500 per year (not counting interest) to pay it off by the time he's 70. Estimating a salary of $30,000 per year as a lead custodian, if he made the payments on time, in good faith, with the intention of being out of debt by the time he can still drive, he has $17,500 annually to live on. And that's barring any unforeseen stuff.

He saw that wasn't going to happen, and made the call. He'd rather be in prison than deal with that scenario.

/super quick and dirty math skills


And you forgot that there is, most likely, still interest accruing. So yeah, the likelihood of him paying this off are similar to winning the lottery...

/which is what he'd need to do...
 
2013-01-19 09:32:41 AM

abhorrent1: He has an English and Law degree and he's a custodian? Get a better Job, dude. Then you can pay your bills.

 
2013-01-19 09:37:44 AM
Bucky badger don't care, bucky badger don't give a shiat.
 
2013-01-19 09:54:42 AM

morgen_benner: abhorrent1: He has an English and Law degree and he's a custodian? Get a better Job, dude. Then you can pay your bills.


As someone who supports higher ed, and who even works at UW-Madison...I have to say this sounds like an instance where the university was wrong in admitting him to law school. They probably had a strong sense that there was no way he would be a lawyer (personality quirks), but thought he might be able to pay, and wanted the money. Sad all around.
 
2013-01-19 10:34:39 AM
As a UW-Madison,employee, I'm confused. Full-time staff have an excellent health care plan available. Did he opt out of paying into it, or something?
 
2013-01-19 10:38:47 AM
Damn, the dude gave away my retirement plans.
 
2013-01-19 10:53:36 AM
He sounds... simple. and like he doesn't want to hurt anyone, but he should not have threatened to do so.
 
2013-01-19 11:02:12 AM

Vodka Zombie: 2and4: Dude did the math:

50 years old, $250,000 debt, that's $12,500 per year (not counting interest) to pay it off by the time he's 70. Estimating a salary of $30,000 per year as a lead custodian, if he made the payments on time, in good faith, with the intention of being out of debt by the time he can still drive, he has $17,500 annually to live on. And that's barring any unforeseen stuff.

He saw that wasn't going to happen, and made the call. He'd rather be in prison than deal with that scenario.

/super quick and dirty math skills

Then again, he could be on Wisconsin's BadgerCare which only allows him to make less than $10,800 a year in return for health care coverage for a chronic medical condition like...  Diabetes.


Or he could have signed up for BadgerCare and been waitlisted. A family member was accepted for BadgerCare in 2009 and put on the waitlist. Three plus years later, there are only 4000 people ahead of her on the list so she is moving up!
 
2013-01-19 11:07:00 AM
i49.tinypic.com

Nice formatting.

/I've seen this guy washing windows in Union South a few times.
//He appears more than "a little" autistic to me.
 
2013-01-19 11:09:37 AM

Moron Police: As someone who supports higher ed, and who even works at UW-Madison...I have to say this sounds like an instance where the university was wrong in admitting him to law school. They probably had a strong sense that there was no way he would be a lawyer (personality quirks), but thought he might be able to pay, and wanted the money. Sad all around.


Do you think a school could refuse to admit a qualified candidate on the grounds that he has personality quirks that would make it difficult for him to pursue a career in his chosen field? Because I think any school that did that would run up against a lawsuit pretty quickly.
 
2013-01-19 11:14:42 AM
I do. I don't work directly in admissions, but I'm close enough to see how it can work. There are some fantastically qualified people on paper that we've turned away due to fit. Yes, you have to document some pieces, but it's very possible. If we have concerns about their mental health or ability to relate, don't we have a duty NOT to set them up for failure just because they can pay? I think higher ed does have a responsibility to prospective students.
 
2013-01-19 11:24:20 AM

Moron Police: I do. I don't work directly in admissions, but I'm close enough to see how it can work. There are some fantastically qualified people on paper that we've turned away due to fit. Yes, you have to document some pieces, but it's very possible. If we have concerns about their mental health or ability to relate, don't we have a duty NOT to set them up for failure just because they can pay? I think higher ed does have a responsibility to prospective students.


I say "we turned this autistic guy away because he's a bad fit", and a lawyer hears "we turned this guy away because he's autistic". I think it's less a case of the university letting him in just to draw tuition out of him, and more a case of the university not wanting to invite retaliatory legal action for a slam-dunk case of violating the Americans With Disabilities Act, or something similar.

Admission statistics for the last four years:
2009: 2951 applicants, 278 enrolled students
2010: 2829 applicants, 246 enrolled students
2011: 2870 applicants, 242 enrolled students
2012: 2153 applicants, 215 enrolled students

The UW law school doesn't appear to be in a situation where they need to relax admissions standards to fill seats.
 
2013-01-19 11:55:43 AM

2and4: Dude did the math:

50 years old, $250,000 debt, that's $12,500 per year (not counting interest) to pay it off by the time he's 70. Estimating a salary of $30,000 per year as a lead custodian, if he made the payments on time, in good faith, with the intention of being out of debt by the time he can still drive, he has $17,500 annually to live on. And that's barring any unforeseen stuff.

He saw that wasn't going to happen, and made the call. He'd rather be in prison than deal with that scenario.

/super quick and dirty math skills


a lead custodian at any large public university probably does quite alright for himself, and there is no way on earth the university of Wisconsin doesn't offer a generous health insurance.
the guy is completely full of shiat.
 
2013-01-19 11:56:28 AM

catmandu: Vodka Zombie: 2and4: Dude did the math:

50 years old, $250,000 debt, that's $12,500 per year (not counting interest) to pay it off by the time he's 70. Estimating a salary of $30,000 per year as a lead custodian, if he made the payments on time, in good faith, with the intention of being out of debt by the time he can still drive, he has $17,500 annually to live on. And that's barring any unforeseen stuff.

He saw that wasn't going to happen, and made the call. He'd rather be in prison than deal with that scenario.

/super quick and dirty math skills

Then again, he could be on Wisconsin's BadgerCare which only allows him to make less than $10,800 a year in return for health care coverage for a chronic medical condition like...  Diabetes.

Or he could have signed up for BadgerCare and been waitlisted. A family member was accepted for BadgerCare in 2009 and put on the waitlist. Three plus years later, there are only 4000 people ahead of her on the list so she is moving up!


Yeah.  My brother is somewhere on that list. I don't think it's going to get better any time soon, either.
 
2013-01-19 11:58:35 AM

wombatsrus: abhorrent1: He has an English and Law degree and he's a custodian? Get a better Job, dude. Then you can pay your bills.

His Total Fark addiction did him in.


skinnyhead is that you?
 
2013-01-19 12:02:56 PM

edmo: Shadi: this is amerca under obamacare

coming eventually to a hospital near you....


This bank robber sounds like he gets all his facts from Rush Limbaugh. How do you earn a law degree but be stupid enough to think this is a good plan?


Um......congress is full of lawyers and look how many of them are complete idiots

Exhibit A:
i265.photobucket.com
 
2013-01-19 12:15:32 PM
A little more than half (54%) of the adults in Madison have a college degree, meaning that many semi-skilled positions in this city are filled by college grads, or at least people who've been to college.

I'm willing to bet that this man has other mental health issues that need to be dealt with, as is the case with many in Wisconsin prisons and jails. Our idiot governor promises more mental health help for the uninsured, but given his constant lying and history of ineptitude I'm not holding my breath.
 
2013-01-19 12:17:42 PM

Vodka Zombie:

Yeah.  My brother is somewhere on that list. I don't think it's going to get better any time soon, either.


I ended up on HIRSP (Health Insurance Risk Savings Plan) while on the waitlist. $185 per month with a $2500 deductible. Good times, good times.
 
2013-01-19 12:24:54 PM

LouDobbsAwaaaay: Moron Police: I do. I don't work directly in admissions, but I'm close enough to see how it can work. There are some fantastically qualified people on paper that we've turned away due to fit. Yes, you have to document some pieces, but it's very possible. If we have concerns about their mental health or ability to relate, don't we have a duty NOT to set them up for failure just because they can pay? I think higher ed does have a responsibility to prospective students.

I say "we turned this autistic guy away because he's a bad fit", and a lawyer hears "we turned this guy away because he's autistic". I think it's less a case of the university letting him in just to draw tuition out of him, and more a case of the university not wanting to invite retaliatory legal action for a slam-dunk case of violating the Americans With Disabilities Act, or something similar.

Admission statistics for the last four years:
2009: 2951 applicants, 278 enrolled students
2010: 2829 applicants, 246 enrolled students
2011: 2870 applicants, 242 enrolled students
2012: 2153 applicants, 215 enrolled students

The UW law school doesn't appear to be in a situation where they need to relax admissions standards to fill seats.


Fair enough. It's an all-around tricky situation, particularly with ranked programs, where on one hand, you're trying to admit a class with top metrics, while still being balanced in other areas (diversity, background, experience).
 
2013-01-19 12:26:32 PM

Vodka Zombie: catmandu: Vodka Zombie: 2and4: Dude did the math:

50 years old, $250,000 debt, that's $12,500 per year (not counting interest) to pay it off by the time he's 70. Estimating a salary of $30,000 per year as a lead custodian, if he made the payments on time, in good faith, with the intention of being out of debt by the time he can still drive, he has $17,500 annually to live on. And that's barring any unforeseen stuff.

He saw that wasn't going to happen, and made the call. He'd rather be in prison than deal with that scenario.

/super quick and dirty math skills

Then again, he could be on Wisconsin's BadgerCare which only allows him to make less than $10,800 a year in return for health care coverage for a chronic medical condition like...  Diabetes.

Or he could have signed up for BadgerCare and been waitlisted. A family member was accepted for BadgerCare in 2009 and put on the waitlist. Three plus years later, there are only 4000 people ahead of her on the list so she is moving up!

Yeah.  My brother is somewhere on that list. I don't think it's going to get better any time soon, either.


Especially since Scotty is determined to turn down Federal money to help fund it.
 
2013-01-19 01:35:25 PM

edmo: This bank robber sounds like he gets all his facts from Rush Limbaugh. How do you earn a law degree but be stupid enough to think this is a good plan?


I don't know if a single regular station in Madison carries Rush. The "best" local talent is a former third-rate country DJ. Besides, it's Madison- the only Republicans in town are the ones elected from the Milwaukee 'burbs and the sticks.
 
2013-01-19 02:04:40 PM
Bucky! Nooooooooo!
 
2013-01-19 02:18:35 PM

Moron Police: I do. I don't work directly in admissions, but I'm close enough to see how it can work. There are some fantastically qualified people on paper that we've turned away due to fit. Yes, you have to document some pieces, but it's very possible. If we have concerns about their mental health or ability to relate, don't we have a duty NOT to set them up for failure just because they can pay? I think higher ed does have a responsibility to prospective students.


I understand exactly what you are saying, but it actually sounds quite paternalistic. What about shattered dreams? I'm sure there are people who are totally unsuited for "X" job... BUT have had a dream of being "X" since they were a child. You're setting your judgement on a higher plain than their dreams. Personally, if I ended up in a job I hated due to secret "guidance" from a well-meaning person who had the power to mold my life, I would consider myself a victim and might even consider a 2nd Amendment solution, even years later, as a rebuttal.

You're not a God. Please don't act like one.

Do you really understand any of this? Or is it just whistling by you?
 
2013-01-19 02:42:12 PM

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: Moron Police: I do. I don't work directly in admissions, but I'm close enough to see how it can work. There are some fantastically qualified people on paper that we've turned away due to fit. Yes, you have to document some pieces, but it's very possible. If we have concerns about their mental health or ability to relate, don't we have a duty NOT to set them up for failure just because they can pay? I think higher ed does have a responsibility to prospective students.

I understand exactly what you are saying, but it actually sounds quite paternalistic. What about shattered dreams? I'm sure there are people who are totally unsuited for "X" job... BUT have had a dream of being "X" since they were a child. You're setting your judgement on a higher plain than their dreams. Personally, if I ended up in a job I hated due to secret "guidance" from a well-meaning person who had the power to mold my life, I would consider myself a victim and might even consider a 2nd Amendment solution, even years later, as a rebuttal.

You're not a God. Please don't act like one.

Do you really understand any of this? Or is it just whistling by you?


I get you, and agree that there is a fine line. In the case of law school, being denied entry by any one school still leaves hundreds of other law schools you can apply to. So in that sense, no one person is responsible for shattering dreams. But there's also a duty to the program to admit students who have the metrics that indicate the ability to do the work (the LSAT, GMAT, and other entry tests are valid for their intended use, though I know they're limited and abused). Admitting students who are clearly not capable of doing the work is a disservice to everyone. It sets them up to waste their time and money, it slows down instruction for others, and everyone loses. Now, translating that to a ubiquitous "fit" is significantly more difficult, but if there are warning signs that an applicant is not likely to succeed (personality, character, etc) and in fact could be disruptive to the learning process and everyone else, I do think there's a duty to deny the applicant. I'm just glad I'm not that admissions person. Though, in most programs, it's not a single individual making that decision, but a committee.

I agree that "tracking" people one way or another without consent is morally reprehensible, but denying an individual applicant admission to a particular program doesn't raise to that level. I don't think it's molding their life.
 
2013-01-19 02:47:41 PM

OhioUGrad: edmo: Shadi: this is amerca under obamacare

coming eventually to a hospital near you....


This bank robber sounds like he gets all his facts from Rush Limbaugh. How do you earn a law degree but be stupid enough to think this is a good plan?

Um......congress is full of lawyers and look how many of them are complete idiots

Exhibit A:
[i265.photobucket.com image 850x985]


Yeah, but she can gobble a mean weiner.
i.imgur.com
Try that, Obama!
 
2013-01-19 03:35:14 PM
Could be all that delicious junk food he's been eating.
www.wisconsinmade.com
 
2013-01-19 06:36:40 PM
I work for UW-Madison, so I know how good the insurance plans are. He shouldn't be paying more than $10 or $15 for any medications, even the expensive ones. Assuming, of course, that he signed up for health insurance.

Not that he's making a lot of money. Lead Custodian has a starting wage of just under $12/hr., and it's unlikely that he'd get a raise, ever, because of Scott Walker. And also because of Walker, employees' cost of benefits like health, dental, etc., has doubled in the past year. I'm earning a third again as much as this guy, and my take-home is about the same as when I was making ten bucks an hour as a line cook with no insurance.
 
2013-01-19 11:43:45 PM
People are still unhinged about Walker? Lol. So predictable.

(Voted against the recall and for fiscal responsibility. Working so far, but I'll be generous to those who continue to protest as it MAY not last.)
 
2013-01-20 12:34:38 AM

Chach: People are still unhinged about Walker? Lol. So predictable.

(Voted against the recall and for fiscal responsibility. Working so far, but I'll be generous to those who continue to protest as it MAY not last.)


Walker borrowed more money in 2 years than Doyle did in 8, then "balanced" the budget with it the exact same say Doyle did instead of changing accounting methods like he had promised in the campaign. WI continues to lose jobs while the states around it improve and is now near the bottom. Yeah, he is working out great. snort.
 
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