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(The Sun)   Everyone grab their knickers: 2.9 magnitude earthquake strikes the East Midlands of England, giving residents an early morning shock. Everybody PANIC   (thesun.co.uk) divider line 76
    More: Scary, East Midlands, earthquake strikes, Melton Mowbray, earthquakes, British Geological Survey, tremors, Derbyshire  
•       •       •

2438 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Jan 2013 at 2:21 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



76 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-01-18 12:04:21 PM  
You can barely feel a 2.9.
 
2013-01-18 12:04:47 PM  
There are approx. 200 - 300 earthquakes like this a year in Britain, usually so small you rarely notice them. No big deal. No devastating pictures of lawn furniture.
 
2013-01-18 12:28:56 PM  
What was the great mid-Atlantic quake, like a 5.1 or something?  I barely felt that, first one in my life I ever felt actually, didn't even realize it was a quake until I saw the news.  A 2.9 is absolutely nothing, I don't think that would even get neighborhood dogs barking.
 
2013-01-18 01:12:06 PM  
encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com


/oblig
 
2013-01-18 01:47:08 PM  

Voiceofreason01: You can barely feel a 2.9.


That's what she said
 
2013-01-18 02:00:25 PM  
2.9?
joshomedesign.com
 
2013-01-18 02:22:36 PM  
So, a landwhale ate a bean casserole yesterday?
 
2013-01-18 02:23:59 PM  
"I do believe I felt something that time Charles ... it was somewhat like the earth was moving."

"Righto. Jolly good."
 
2013-01-18 02:26:08 PM  
We should have some sort of benefit for the victims.
 
2013-01-18 02:26:11 PM  

nekom: What was the great mid-Atlantic quake, like a 5.1 or something?  I barely felt that, first one in my life I ever felt actually, didn't even realize it was a quake until I saw the news.  A 2.9 is absolutely nothing, I don't think that would even get neighborhood dogs barking.


*If* you are right on top of the epicenter a 2.9 quake is certainly noticeable. But get a half mile or so away and.. not so much. Of course it also depends on whether it's a shallow or deep quake...
 
2013-01-18 02:26:26 PM  
He stands straight up in the morning and he gives my wife a shock.
 
2013-01-18 02:27:02 PM  
Didn't know they had Taco Bell in England.
 
2013-01-18 02:27:09 PM  
I live in Southern California, I don't notice any thing below 4.0 any more.
 
2013-01-18 02:27:22 PM  
I live near the epicentre, there has been panic, looting and a complete breakdown of law and order.

Well I guess that was what happened, I slept through it.

/at 5am I would probably sleep through a 9.0
 
2013-01-18 02:27:32 PM  
we had a 4.3 off the coast of Dover/Folkestone a few years ago. We felt it 15 miles inland, and my workmate, who lives in folkestone, said the ground vibrated violently for a few seconds. Varying degrees of structural damage and one woman got whiplash. I just remember laying in bed feeling a sense of movement, and a small ornament against our window rattled a bit
 
2013-01-18 02:31:22 PM  
We're all English today!

/Never Forget!
 
2013-01-18 02:31:28 PM  

Spiralmonkey: There are approx. 200 - 300 earthquakes like this a year in Britain, usually so small you rarely notice them. No big deal. No devastating pictures of lawn furniture.


This. It typically takes the frackers to cause a bigger earthquake. That is when they cause a fair amount of damage. The last big one nearly crushed my niece to death when the chimney went through her bedroom and missed her by a foot.
 
2013-01-18 02:33:38 PM  

abhorrent1: We're all English today!


I did forget to brush my teeth this morning ...

/I kid, I kid
 
2013-01-18 02:35:22 PM  
I have only felt one earthquake in my life. It just felt like a big truck going by the house. The weird part was the strange low frequency noise.
 
2013-01-18 02:38:35 PM  

Voiceofreason01: You can barely feel a 2.9.


Depends what type. If it is rolling; the type you hear coming, ya sure.

I went through a 4.1. Just woke up and lying in bed then bam, on the floor, no warning nothing. Whole place shifted 4 feet one way, and back 8 feet, twice and it was over. It basically jolted me off my bed. Hit my head on the side of the nightstand.
 
2013-01-18 02:38:37 PM  

Voiceofreason01: You can barely feel a 2.9.


That's what she said.
 
2013-01-18 02:39:05 PM  
What's with the scary tag? A who gives a fart tag would have been more appropriate.

/ Here in Cali, we eat 6s for breakfast.
// We blame 7s on the taco truck
 
2013-01-18 02:39:16 PM  
Is the UK accustomed to earthquakes?.
 
2013-01-18 02:40:09 PM  

Voiceofreason01: You can barely feel a 2.9.


On the upside, you don't have to brush the snow off the sheep now.
 
2013-01-18 02:44:14 PM  
As a survivor of the noticeable but non-harmful Maryland quake of last year, I stand firmly with my UK brethren.
 
2013-01-18 02:44:16 PM  
I grew up in Toronto, also not known for earthquakes. Every time a small one hit it was big news, and for good reason. The reason is this: earthquakes are neat. Everyone who has lived in a "stable" area desperately wants to experience one. People aren't freaking out because they are frightened, they're freaking out because it's cool and interesting.

My wish was granted in Seattle in 2001. Not a hugely powerful earthquake but it was wicked cool.
 
2013-01-18 02:45:37 PM  

Stantz: we had a 4.3 off the coast of Dover/Folkestone a few years ago 10th of a score ago. We felt it 15 miles 24 kilometers inland, and my workmate, who lives in folkestone, said the ground vibrated juddered violently for a few seconds. Varying degrees of structural primary damage and one woman got whiplash whoopla. I just remember laying in bed feeling a sense of movement transit, and a small ornament against our window rattled clattered a bit

that's better
 
2013-01-18 02:45:44 PM  

Ghastly: I have only felt one earthquake in my life. It just felt like a big truck going by the house. The weird part was the strange low frequency noise.


I've never felt one, I always seem to sleep through them.
 
2013-01-18 02:46:09 PM  
Christchurch, NZ palms it collective faces at you. There are usually several here that size PER DAY (though to be fair there were only 8 last week) You don't even feel them. People check quakes here the way UK checks the weather; Link

UK were always pansies, but damn they are really mutating into a bunch of shrinking violets lately.
 
2013-01-18 02:47:49 PM  
Dear Farkers,
Please help the victims of a massive 2.9 earthquake and donate to the:
Leicestershire Disaster Relief Fund @ makemerich.com
Think of the children.
U. Ben Hadagain
 
2013-01-18 02:49:14 PM  

wurdjunky: What's with the scary tag? A who gives a fart tag would have been more appropriate.

/ Here in Cali, we eat 6s for breakfast.
// We blame 7s on the taco truck


Bullshiat. We haven't had a 6.x in Cali in a long time and the Northridge one that was 6.2 or 6.4 did a lot more damage than anything you've ever had for breakfast.

Yeah, we're used to earthquakes and most of the are below 4 but 6s will be doing quite a bit of damage. The good think is we're not on a subduction fault thus no 8s or 9s for us.
 
2013-01-18 02:50:46 PM  
I don't think I would notice a 2.9. I believe Southern California get ones around that daily but no one notices or gives a shiat.
 
2013-01-18 02:51:23 PM  

Valiente: Voiceofreason01: You can barely feel a 2.9.

On the upside, you don't have to brush the snow off the sheep now.


I've LOL'ed
 
2013-01-18 02:54:15 PM  
England you are a bunch of pussies

i.imgur.com
 
2013-01-18 02:56:13 PM  
EVERYBODY STIFF UPPER LIP.

I spent the first couple of decades on or near the Ring of Fire and never felt an earthquake. I had to move to Ottawa to finally experience one. It wasn't until 10 minutes afterwards that I realised what it was.

/we thought a gas canister had blown up outside
//stood around for a while talking before someone said "Do you think maybe we should evacuate?"
 
2013-01-18 02:59:08 PM  

Corvus: England you are a bunch of pussies

[i.imgur.com image 527x489]


788? Bah. Amateurs.

Sincerely,
Canterbury, New Zealand.
 
2013-01-18 02:59:41 PM  
2.9?

static.flickr.com
 
2013-01-18 03:00:16 PM  
cdn.ricochet.com

/Pray for  Leicestershire.
 
2013-01-18 03:02:20 PM  

Corvus: England you are a bunch of pussies

[i.imgur.com image 527x489]


Ooh! People in Cali are so cool and tough. They can handle their house shaking a little once in a while.
Come to the mid-west and sit in the path of an F4 Tornado. Bring extra underwear in the event you survive, ITG.
 
2013-01-18 03:04:01 PM  
I guess this is where the Calfornicans who were whining when the temperature dipped below 55 earlier this week try to sound tough.

/but yeah, 2.9 isn't much. We had a 3.5 last summer and all I noticed was my fridge rattling.
 
2013-01-18 03:06:19 PM  

abhorrent1: Corvus: England you are a bunch of pussies

[i.imgur.com image 527x489]

Ooh! People in Cali are so cool and tough. They can handle their house shaking a little once in a while.
Come to the mid-west and sit in the path of an F4 Tornado. Bring extra underwear in the event you survive, ITG.


Am I biatching about some strong wind? No.
 
2013-01-18 03:07:36 PM  

abhorrent1: Corvus: England you are a bunch of pussies

[i.imgur.com image 527x489]

Ooh! People in Cali are so cool and tough. They can handle their house shaking a little once in a while.
Come to the mid-west and sit in the path of an F4 Tornado. Bring extra underwear in the event you survive, ITG.


Unlike earthquakes, tornadoes are preventable. Most of the rest of the world learned that years ago, and keep our trailer parks limited to safe low numbers well below the tornado threshold. When you bumpkins will finally figure that out is anybodies guess.
 
2013-01-18 03:08:16 PM  

fireclown: As a survivor of the noticeable but non-harmful Maryland quake of last year, I stand firmly with my UK brethren.


As a fellow survivor of that quake, I learned the correct evacuation procedure is to ask dumb questions to your coworkers, then wander outside and mill around in the parking lot alternately staring at the sky and at your cellphone. After about 30 minutes maybe go back in or go to lunch. Whatever.
 
2013-01-18 03:10:50 PM  

Jument: I grew up in Toronto, also not known for earthquakes. Every time a small one hit it was big news, and for good reason. The reason is this: earthquakes are neat. Everyone who has lived in a "stable" area desperately wants to experience one.


Not me. Houses in Denmark are generally not designed to withstand earthquakes.
 
2013-01-18 03:12:41 PM  
I'm about 15 miles away from epicentre. Din't feel note.
 
2013-01-18 03:15:25 PM  
Waiting for the volcano... everyone else has one. I want one too!
 
2013-01-18 03:17:58 PM  
Hearthquakes 'ardly 'ever 'appen in 'ertfordshire.

Small quakes are common in the UK. Most often they occur in the midlands, it seems.

Charles Hoy Fort collected many descriptions of "anomalous" small quakes and descriptions of "thunder" from the sky which accompanied them. If he had been less of a skeptic and a joker, or if he had had some knowledge of, say, medical semiotics, he might have realized that these sounds did not really come from the sky but were created by the quakes. As it was he was a skeptic and a joker and liked to mock the positivism of nineteenth and early twentieth century science, so he suggested these sounds really did come from the sky and that they may have had nothing to do with the quakes.

The British Isles are still rebounding from the ice cap that covered bits of them during the last glaciation. Scotland is rising, and conversely, the South of England is sinking. This, combined with rising sea levels and erosion, as well as some human activities such as peat cutting, has resulted in a fair amount of land lost to the sea, including some prosperous medieval towns and villages.

Although Britain is not sitting on the kind of subduction zone that produces the most spectacular earthquakes and volcanoes, it is still mildly geologically active, hence the small earthquakes. I don't know of any really big ones in historical times.

There are similar areas in North America where small earthquakes are common and large ones very rare.

We have had a number of earthquakes between 4 and 4.5 in the National Capital Region (or rather, in nearby Quebec) and in my native New Brunswick. I was indoors through all of these, but the building swayed and made a noise like trouble with an elevator in one, and the dishes rattled in another. My parents and neighbours reported that the earthquake sounded like a train going by across the river in this latter case, because they were outside on the patio.

Both the Ottawa River Valley and the Maritime Provinces are also sinking gently because of the rebound of Hudson's Bay and the surrounding tundra and boreal forest from the last glaciation, so I suppose we are experiencing the same sort of geological activity as the UK. There are other places where earthquakes are more violent. The St. Louis area has had bad quakes in the past and will likely have another soon, which is to say within the next couple of centuries, because you can't really predict earthquakes much better than that . The mechanism and type of these earthquakes is quite different from the usual quakes that you get in California or Japan. You can find more details online easily enough.
 
2013-01-18 03:20:54 PM  

Dansker: Jument: I grew up in Toronto, also not known for earthquakes. Every time a small one hit it was big news, and for good reason. The reason is this: earthquakes are neat. Everyone who has lived in a "stable" area desperately wants to experience one.

Not me. Houses in Denmark are generally not designed to withstand earthquakes.


That's a point. I should qualify that we want to feel a little one. :)
 
2013-01-18 03:24:30 PM  
Grew up in Oregon and have experienced a couple minor quakes.

The neatest one was when I lived over my parent's garage and had a water bed. Felt like I was on a giant jell-o mold that someone had slapped towards the bottom.

Now I live in Arizona and although it's a scorching hell during the Summer, there are relatively few to no natural disasters here to worry about.

/unless Yellowstone goes Ka-Blooey
//then everyone in the States is proper farked
///it's a dry, face melting-ish heat
 
2013-01-18 03:25:29 PM  

Jument: Dansker: Jument: I grew up in Toronto, also not known for earthquakes. Every time a small one hit it was big news, and for good reason. The reason is this: earthquakes are neat. Everyone who has lived in a "stable" area desperately wants to experience one.

Not me. Houses in Denmark are generally not designed to withstand earthquakes.

That's a point. I should qualify that we want to feel a little one. :)


I just want to cop a little feel...
 
2013-01-18 03:25:57 PM  
2.9? Your seat vibrates harder than that when you fart.
 
2013-01-18 03:26:03 PM  

ddam: wurdjunky: What's with the scary tag? A who gives a fart tag would have been more appropriate.

/ Here in Cali, we eat 6s for breakfast.
// We blame 7s on the taco truck

Bullshiat. We haven't had a 6.x in Cali in a long time and the Northridge one that was 6.2 or 6.4 did a lot more damage than anything you've ever had for breakfast.

Yeah, we're used to earthquakes and most of the are below 4 but 6s will be doing quite a bit of damage. The good think is we're not on a subduction fault thus no 8s or 9s for us.


Checked the USGS web site. In southern CA, over the last week there have been 8 quakes measuring 2.5+. Over the last month there has been one 4.0 quake.
 
2013-01-18 03:32:14 PM  

neversubmit: Waiting for the volcano... everyone else has one. I want one too!


Volcano insurance
 
2013-01-18 03:32:25 PM  

ddam: wurdjunky: What's with the scary tag? A who gives a fart tag would have been more appropriate.

/ Here in Cali, we eat 6s for breakfast.
// We blame 7s on the taco truck

Bullshiat. We haven't had a 6.x in Cali in a long time and the Northridge one that was 6.2 or 6.4 did a lot more damage than anything you've ever had for breakfast.

Yeah, we're used to earthquakes and most of the are below 4 but 6s will be doing quite a bit of damage. The good think is we're not on a subduction fault thus no 8s or 9s for us.


The early mid-late 80s through the mid 90s were the high times for the big ones in california it seemed. Loma Prieta, Landers, Northridge, Big Bear, Here is a wiki list:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_earthquakes_in_California
 
2013-01-18 03:41:56 PM  

ddam: wurdjunky: What's with the scary tag? A who gives a fart tag would have been more appropriate.

/ Here in Cali, we eat 6s for breakfast.
// We blame 7s on the taco truck

Bullshiat. We haven't had a 6.x in Cali in a long time and the Northridge one that was 6.2 or 6.4 did a lot more damage than anything you've ever had for breakfast.

Yeah, we're used to earthquakes and most of the are below 4 but 6s will be doing quite a bit of damage. The good think is we're not on a subduction fault thus no 8s or 9s for us.


True, but every time I talk to a midwesterner who's never been here they seem to think we wake up to big ones on a daily basis.

Csb time
About 20 years ago i was in a barracks room on Pendleton when we had a small one, probably a 3 or 4. Me an a couple of guys from LA. got a kick when this dude from Indiana comes running down from the 3rd floor screaming "Get out of the building! It's an earthquake!" He was convinced the whole building might come down. All the Cali natives and the longtimers were laughing our asses off while he stood in the grass half naked trying to get his boots on.

/ end csb
 
2013-01-18 03:48:42 PM  

Dansker: Jument: Dansker: Jument: I grew up in Toronto, also not known for earthquakes. Every time a small one hit it was big news, and for good reason. The reason is this: earthquakes are neat. Everyone who has lived in a "stable" area desperately wants to experience one.

Not me. Houses in Denmark are generally not designed to withstand earthquakes.

That's a point. I should qualify that we want to feel a little one. :)

I just want to cop a little feel...


Yes, just as I hit post I realized that statement was a tad ambiguous.
 
2013-01-18 03:49:11 PM  

blatz514: neversubmit: Waiting for the volcano... everyone else has one. I want one too!

Volcano insurance


go on
 
2013-01-18 03:52:02 PM  
On top of the Great Blizzard of 2013? Shiat it's the end of the world...
 
2013-01-18 04:01:58 PM  

dragonhead: I'm about 15 miles away from epicentre. Din't feel note.


Where they are digging up Richard ?
 
2013-01-18 04:13:30 PM  

brantgoose: Although Britain is not sitting on the kind of subduction zone that produces the most spectacular earthquakes and volcanoes, it is still mildly geologically active, hence the small earthquakes. I don't know of any really big ones in historical times.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1884_Colchester_earthquake, which was centred close to Wivenhoe where I grew up, is what passes for a significant earthquake in England.
 
2013-01-18 04:26:58 PM  
2.9?

*yawn*

/SoCal resident
 
2013-01-18 04:37:30 PM  
FTA: "Mr Bukits said that properties in the area, which has a history of earthquakes, would not have suffered any structural damage."

I'm pretty sure that "Bukits" is a variant spelling of "Bucket" and it is pronounced "boo kay."

/just sayin'.

25.media.tumblr.com
Hot -- unlike Hyacinth
 
2013-01-18 04:41:59 PM  

Jument: I grew up in Toronto, also not known for earthquakes. Every time a small one hit it was big news, and for good reason. The reason is this: earthquakes are neat. Everyone who has lived in a "stable" area desperately wants to experience one. People aren't freaking out because they are frightened, they're freaking out because it's cool and interesting.

My wish was granted in Seattle in 2001. Not a hugely powerful earthquake but it was wicked cool.


Git on back to Canuckistan, ya freakin' hoser!

/Just kiddin', youse kin stay
 
2013-01-18 04:57:31 PM  

HammerHeadSnark: FTA: "Mr Bukits said that properties in the area, which has a history of earthquakes, would not have suffered any structural damage."

I'm pretty sure that "Bukits" is a variant spelling of "Bucket" and it is pronounced "boo kay."

/just sayin'.

[25.media.tumblr.com image 500x372]
Hot -- unlike Hyacinth


Won' t some one think of the Royal Doulton with hand painted periwinkles?
 
2013-01-18 05:15:47 PM  

Jument: I grew up in Toronto, also not known for earthquakes. Every time a small one hit it was big news, and for good reason. The reason is this: earthquakes are neat. Everyone who has lived in a "stable" area desperately wants to experience one. People aren't freaking out because they are frightened, they're freaking out because it's cool and interesting.

My wish was granted in Seattle in 2001. Not a hugely powerful earthquake but it was wicked cool.


I work on the 26th floor of a building in San Francisco. There is nothing cool about Earthquakes, and I can happily go the rest of my life without feeling another.
 
2013-01-18 05:19:28 PM  
 
2013-01-18 05:33:51 PM  
sd.keepcalm-o-matic.co.uk
/hot
//as hell
 
2013-01-18 05:36:44 PM  

HammerHeadSnark: FTA: "Mr Bukits said that properties in the area, which has a history of earthquakes, would not have suffered any structural damage."

I'm pretty sure that "Bukits" is a variant spelling of "Bucket" and it is pronounced "boo kay."

/just sayin'.

[25.media.tumblr.com image 500x372]
Hot -- unlike Hyacinth


But not as hot as Rose
i.ytimg.com
 
2013-01-18 05:43:06 PM  

blatz514: [encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com image 260x194]


/oblig


Came for the chair, thank you, thank you.
 
2013-01-18 05:45:38 PM  
2.9? My favorite local bar has been relegated to operating from out of the hulk of a damaged municipal bus, towed onto to a lot that used to be a building. Because the other buildings the bar used to be in collapsed from quakes. The last two consecutive years running.

Those whiners in UK can kiss our collective asses.

/Anyone going through Christchurch, drop by for a pint. Its called the 'Smash Palace', on Healy St. right across from the shell of the big wrecked Victorian Cathedral.
 
2013-01-18 06:01:10 PM  
I suppose we don't pray for Omarion over there, so Pray for Richard Hammond.
 
2013-01-18 06:51:36 PM  
Symptoms of shock:

An extremely low blood pressure
Feeling weak or nauseous
Chest pain
Fast but weak pulse
Profuse sweating
Dizziness, faintness or light-headedness
Moist, clammy skin
Unconsciousness
Rapid, shallow breathing
Feeling anxious, agitated or confused
Blue lips and fingernails
Death
 
2013-01-18 09:01:28 PM  
I used to live 200 feet from a major train line in the Hudson valley. We'd get a tremor every few years, or so I read in the papers, but I probably thought it was just another train.
 
2013-01-18 11:28:50 PM  
Anything under a 5 is a non-event, even in an area where the building codes aren't set up to create quake-resistant buildings. In California, Japan, etc, you probably have to get into the mid 6s before many people will worry or be affected.
 
2013-01-18 11:52:00 PM  

Arnprior Joe: Anything under a 5 is a non-event.


Not for people who have never experienced an earthquake.
 
2013-01-19 08:15:01 AM  

pjc51: brantgoose: Although Britain is not sitting on the kind of subduction zone that produces the most spectacular earthquakes and volcanoes, it is still mildly geologically active, hence the small earthquakes. I don't know of any really big ones in historical times.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1884_Colchester_earthquake, which was centred close to Wivenhoe where I grew up, is what passes for a significant earthquake in England.


More recent and more significant was the Market Rasen earthquake in 2008. That was a 5.2. My in-laws were lying in bed when the chimney stack fell through their bedroom ceiling, they were lucky they only had some scratches from falling plaster. Their greenhouse fell down and they did, in fact, find their garden furniture had moved. And the cat threw up on the kitchen floor, but that may or may not be related. That cat is a manky little bastard.
 
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