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(Herald Sun)   That's not a nugget, THIS is a nugget   (heraldsun.com.au) divider line 73
    More: Cool, Ballarat, gold nuggets  
•       •       •

17507 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Jan 2013 at 9:54 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



73 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-01-18 01:19:32 PM  

Deep Contact: Amazing gold is worth so much. It's only real value is in electronics and optics.
Probably from ancient times when we mined gold for the aliens and they gave us food morsels or beads.


Also used to kill cybermen.
 
2013-01-18 01:20:17 PM  

StoPPeRmobile: Looks like a spoon to me.


There is no spoon
 
2013-01-18 01:21:52 PM  

MaritimeGirl: It's kind of a shame it'll be melted down as it is more impressive as is.


It's more valuable to collectors as a raw nugget.  But it may take longer to find a buyer. Whether he takes the time to maximize return or refines it for quick cash remains to be seen.  Given the patience required to find the thing, I'm betting he'll wait.
 
2013-01-18 01:39:56 PM  
Good for him!
 
2013-01-18 01:59:39 PM  
i220.photobucket.com
i220.photobucket.com
i220.photobucket.com

I like watching her handle big nuggets.
 
2013-01-18 02:00:45 PM  
cdn09.realitynation.com
 
2013-01-18 02:17:10 PM  
Did it threaten to shoot Obama?

Oh..... nugget.
 
2013-01-18 02:22:06 PM  
No pics of nugs yet? I guess all the stoners are watching Scooby Doo.
 
2013-01-18 02:43:30 PM  
Article includes 23 seconds of hardcore Jew porn!
 
2013-01-18 03:33:03 PM  

Jument: TheMysticS: BigLuca: Deep Contact: Amazing gold is worth so much. It's only real value is in electronics and optics.
Probably from ancient times when we mined gold for the aliens and they gave us food morsels or beads.

It is amazing the number of times people, smart people, have told me they back a gold standard because the dollar have value based on people believing it does, but gold has intrinsic value based on it's scarcity.

I then point out the number of materials that are rarer and way cheaper than gold, but ... nope, nothing.

I hear ya.

I've argued for platinum, or rare earth metals. I gave up ever discussing that again, as I could not get them to understand intrinsic values blahblahblah. I forget the name- but there's a d&d module I've played, based on books I can't remember the title to, either- but steel is the main currency, because it's the most useful metal. Gold is worth less than copper.
I dunno- Weave probably knows it, though.

Sheeit, we could use printer ink!

You can't base value on usefulness because water is the most useful thing ever (try going a few days without any) and unless you're in a desert that shiat is farking everywhere.

Actually, air is even more "useful". An economy that used air as a medium of trade would be... inconvenient.


mimg.ugo.com
 
2013-01-18 03:56:15 PM  

Preston Preston:


I was thinking about the shrunk daffy chasing a pearl but you were first with the most
 
2013-01-18 03:57:07 PM  

Jument: TheMysticS: BigLuca: Deep Contact: Amazing gold is worth so much. It's only real value is in electronics and optics.
Probably from ancient times when we mined gold for the aliens and they gave us food morsels or beads.

It is amazing the number of times people, smart people, have told me they back a gold standard because the dollar have value based on people believing it does, but gold has intrinsic value based on it's scarcity.

I then point out the number of materials that are rarer and way cheaper than gold, but ... nope, nothing.

I hear ya.

I've argued for platinum, or rare earth metals. I gave up ever discussing that again, as I could not get them to understand intrinsic values blahblahblah. I forget the name- but there's a d&d module I've played, based on books I can't remember the title to, either- but steel is the main currency, because it's the most useful metal. Gold is worth less than copper.
I dunno- Weave probably knows it, though.

Sheeit, we could use printer ink!

You can't base value on usefulness because water is the most useful thing ever (try going a few days without any) and unless you're in a desert that shiat is farking everywhere.

Actually, air is even more "useful". An economy that used air as a medium of trade would be... inconvenient.


Like Wind Raiders?
 
2013-01-18 04:04:18 PM  
George Babbitt:
Hey, be fair! There's water as well as air in that!
 
2013-01-18 04:23:43 PM  
Came for the Owen Hart pic.

/leaving satisfied.
 
2013-01-18 04:37:41 PM  
A few months back I think it was the discovery channel had a pretty good show about how much the earth was worth. They took all the precious metals calculated how much had been dug and how much was estimated to be still out there. They took a lot into account. I never found out the value it was late and I passed out. But they brought up the fact that there are gold particles in the oceans.
 
2013-01-18 04:46:08 PM  

StoPPeRmobile: Looks like a spoon to me.


Alright, alright, you win. I see you've played nuggety-spoony before.
 
2013-01-18 05:45:04 PM  
olddeegee,

What happened to her? I've not seen her on tv for a couple years.

Also, her boobs look smaller in your pictures than I remember.
 
2013-01-18 09:00:01 PM  
Did someone say Nugget?
marijuana-seeds-weed.com
 
2013-01-18 10:09:39 PM  
Yes, I found this 5.5 kilogram nugget with my Minelab GPX-5000. It's the best in the world, you know. Truly, the $5000 purchase price of Minelab GPX-5000 is well worth it, when you consider that only with the Minelab GPX-5000 will you find $300,000 gold nuggets. Yes indeed.

/Minelab GPX-5000
 
2013-01-19 02:42:27 AM  
I use a Minelab GPX-5000 and before this I used the GPX-4500 and the GPX-4000. I've found quite a few gold nuggets with it too although nothing as large as the recent 177 ounce nugget from last week. But I have SEEN much larger nuggets found by others, some so large that they can't easily be carried or lifted. They end up buying cars and houses or even helicopters with their gold. A friend that uses one found $1.2M worth of gold with his detector within a small area the size of a bathtub last year. In his case it wasn't a single nugget but gold in two large slabs of quartz. One specimen yielded over 14 kilos of gold from a 63 kilogram specimen of quartz. He does it full time of course.

The guy in the media pictures holding that nugget is not the guy who found it. The one who found it has gone to ground. The guy posting with pictures of it is the gold nugget broker that the finder is using to sell the nugget.

Here's some pics of my own:

www.pbase.com
Me exploring an old gold-filled gully about 2 hours from Sydney (pic by my wife).


www.pbase.com
A very large 5+ ouncer.


www.pbase.com
6 Ounces of gold nuggets.


www.pbase.com
2.4 Kilos of gold melted from a specimen and made into ingots for transport.


www.pbase.com
7+ Kilos of gold from a specimen that gave up 14+ kilos in total.


www.pbase.com
My wife with one of her own finds
 
2013-01-19 02:49:27 AM  

whither_apophis: deadsanta: That detector costs between 5-7k with shipping, and gets quite a heap of praise in the article. Viral marketing?

Yeah, something's off about this story. No other metal detector can find an eleven pound hunk of metal under two feet of rock?


from what i heard, it's not a metal detector. it's a gold detector. that's why it costs so much.
 
2013-01-19 04:52:54 AM  

theodopolis13: whither_apophis: deadsanta: That detector costs between 5-7k with shipping, and gets quite a heap of praise in the article. Viral marketing?

Yeah, something's off about this story. No other metal detector can find an eleven pound hunk of metal under two feet of rock?

from what i heard, it's not a metal detector. it's a gold detector. that's why it costs so much.


It's not viral marketing although it's one of the most expensive on the market today. The same company produces detectors that start at about $395 and go up to the GPX which sells locally for about $6K. There's about 15 models in between that they make but the GPX is the only Pulse Induction detector in the range (see below).

The GPX is the best detector in the world for gold (just ask any prospector) but you can find gold nuggets closer to the surface with any metal detector. The GPXs are expensive and they couple probably be sold for a fraction of the price if there was any competition but the manufacturer who makes them has a lot of patents on the machine. The predecessor to the GPX was the SD-2000 which Minelab released almost a couple of decades ago. The SD-2000 was handmade at the Minelab factory and sold for about 4 ounces of gold at the time... the same as the GPX-5000 does today.

The average metal detector can only detect as deep as around 12 inches (1 foot). If you take a coin and relic detector into a goldfield, they can't handle the high iron and mineral content so you'll only be able to pick up on targets near the surface. But so-called "gold detectors" are a bit more specialized... they can handle and ignore the most mineralized soils that other detectors simply can't operate on and in places like Australia, that's the sort of soil where most gold is found. To top it off, the GPX had 10 patents on it when it was released... and it has a depth of over 5 feet and is a P.I. detector (a Pulse Induction machine... whereas most other detectors are VLF - Very Low Frequency). The company that makes them (Minelab) have an ongoing contract with the US Dept of Defense - which is where their name comes from.

Whilst it's called a "Gold Detector", it can be used to search for any metal and for artifacts. It has the ability to discriminate against iron and steel but it's so sensitive that a thunderstorm over 400 miles away can cause interference (in the form of bursts of static when there's a thunder-strike). They are far too sensitive to be used in a town and need to be operated way out in the bush. They are easy to use and although my wife and I have never taken the free training day that comes with the purchase of one, you do get tuition with the machines when purchasing one from a dealer. The Chinese have been counterfeting the GPXs for the last 4 years or so although they don't reproduce the electronics but instead wire the inside of the fake machine to the innards of a cheaper VLF detector so it looks like the counterfeit machines works.

I turned down two offers for 3 months work in the Sudan to teach the gold hunters there how to use them. The pay was half a million dollars but my Aussie passport was worth $1M on the black market there so... no dice. But in 2008, the average GPX-4500 was finding an estimated 12 kilos of gold every 24 hours. The locals would hire them out for "free" but you had to give them half of whatever you found at the end of the following day. It kept people honest because if you didn't turn over enough gold, someone else got to hire the machine instead. It was all pretty amusing until someone near Khartoum uncovered drums nuclear waste with his GPX that had been dumped in the desert by persons unknown. They found some of the world's largest nuggets ever seen before in 2008-2009 but the Africans have no concept of value and sold it all to dealers who immediately melted the nuggets down. I'm not complaining though because it means the nugget in the OP's post is still assured a place in the world as one of the largest to be sold.

www.pbase.com
 
2013-01-19 04:37:30 PM  
20 largest Alaskan nuggets
Link
 
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