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(Daily Mail)   In what could be considered a turnabout is fair play move to customer sites like Angie's List, Nastyclient.com is set up for contractors to name and shame bad clients   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 221
    More: Interesting, Matt Stachel, TripAdvisor, anonymous post, shopkeepers, Better Business Bureau  
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13185 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Jan 2013 at 9:11 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-17 10:57:07 PM

5monkeys: The faucet is backwards and I still can't figure out how they did that. I mean seriously? How do you do that?


I currently live in a place with every single hot and cold water the reverse of what you'd expect. I thought there was no hot water in the shower the first night because I didn't think of turning it to cold to get hot water.

I have no idea how the contractor who remodeled the place before I moved in didn't notice they have everything backwards.
 
2013-01-17 11:01:11 PM
 
2013-01-17 11:01:31 PM
I have 20+ years of painting and tiling experience (my brother is a GC and I assist him often, usually weekends).

I have learned that if a customer wants to stand over your shoulder and watch you work, fine. I personally don't like it, but I find myself asking them politely to please hold off on any questions, comments, critiquing, or judgements until I tell you the job is finished.

Painting is a good example. let's say it takes 5 hours to paint* a bedroom. let's say 4 1/2 hours of that is spent doing prep work and cutting in. the last 1/2 hour is spent rolling. if the customer comes in the room at the 4 1/2 hour mark, they will be dissatisfied with the progress. if they come in at the 5 hour mark, they will be shiatting rainbows and inviting you to stay for dinner.

so, those who have done it for a while know how to 'manipulate the customers perspective'. locate the easiest (least prep-work involved) wall and start on that one. fill those nail holes first, caulk that baseboard first, as soon as the main 'field' surface of that wall is ready, roll a coat of paint on it.

now continue about the room doing your normal prep work, but if the customer peeks in, they see progress; they see the color on the wall.

it still takes you 5 hours to paint that room, but one way, the customer is worried and second-guessing themselves and your ability. the second way, the customer is at ease.

that's why dealing with the people is as important as dealing with the task.
 
2013-01-17 11:04:26 PM
It's easy. Don't do any work for anyone from New York or New Jersey. They expect to get cheated and they will cheat you first instead so as to be the cheater and not the cheatee.

/Florida generalizations are accurate generalizations
 
2013-01-17 11:10:40 PM
and another culprit for the increasingly demanding customer is the home improvement tv shows. your Mike Holmes and Ty Pennington and Trading Places and Bath Crashers, Extreme Makeover, Flip This House... DIY network and HGTV shows are giving customers an unrealistic expectation of what is actually involved in doing a project, doing it right, doing it within budget, and doing it within a reasonable time.
 
2013-01-17 11:15:32 PM
The rationale behind watching the workers do their jobs is simple: I am smart, and practically everyone else on the planet is a blithering retard.

It doesn't matter if I have never done wiring, or plumbing, or whatever else the case may be. I know that presumption of retardedness is universal. I know that if I am not there, they will make a lot of totally stupid, and even inexplicable mistakes. The fact that this is their profession, and they have been doing it for 25 years has NOTHING to do with it. They are still stupid.

So while I am there, I can reduce the number of stupid things done by others somewhat.

Just some examples from years gone by:

A. Hey, Mr. Electrician dude running the new outlet for the clothes dryer. Congrats on putting the box on an interior wall. I was trying to decide whether I wanted to just vent the exhaust indoors, or run the dryer cord across to the other side of the closet.

B. Hey, Mr. Bathtub surround installer dude, you know the lower gasket has a crease in it. Hmmm, maybe there's a reason for that. Have you ever wondered why that might be? No? No foolin'?

C. Hey, Mr. Toilet tank float engineer dude, you see this place where the threads from the drop-rod are? You know, the place where the walls are the thinnest. Where do you imagine would be the worst possible spot for attachment of the dipping prong? And where did you put it.

D. Hey, Mr. Kitchen sink sprayer assembler dude, when you push on the spray diverter, which fulcrum do you imagine takes the most force? So, where would you like to support the fulcrum with a whopping 2mm of useless-grade plastic. No kidding?

E. Hey, Mr. Kitchen door weather strip installer dude, which side of the door do you imagine would be best to install the strip to keep the rain out?

F. Hey, Mr. contracted landscaper worker, about how far away from the structure do you imagine you need to buzzkill ALL that grows with a weedeater before you can call your job good? Oh, about 2 feet should do. Yes, there will be nothing growing near that building, that's for sure.

G. ...list goes on forever....
 
2013-01-17 11:16:40 PM
however, This Old House, and Ask This Old House are both pretty accurately representative of their craft.

Hometime was pretty good also.

and give me Miriam Johnson any day of the week... yummers.

/even when she was pregnant.
 
2013-01-17 11:18:01 PM
So, now wealthy owners of businesses can retaliate against any victim who dares to try to fight back against their awful business practices?

"What? You're upset because we used dollar store peanut butter instead of asphalt to pave your driveway? Shut your lip and pay up before I tell everyone what a complainer you are on Nastyclient!"
 
2013-01-17 11:21:16 PM

thecpt: Good. Now do it for architects.


I'm an architect and I approve of this.

/made plenty of money fixing what other "architects" did
 
2013-01-17 11:21:19 PM

sxacho: It's easy. Don't do any work for anyone from New York or New Jersey. They expect to get cheated and they will cheat you first instead so as to be the cheater and not the cheatee.

/Florida generalizations are accurate generalizations


When I lived in CT I had a friend who was a chimney sweep, a pretty rare specialty. He went to Long Island and swept the Billy Joel/Christie Brinkley chimney. BJ laid low - welcomed him and disappeared. CB skulked suspicously, screeched at BJ from across the compound, and treated Paul like an indentured servant. He told me she was less beautiful afterward, if you can believe that.
 
2013-01-17 11:21:26 PM

calbert: [mlkshk.com image 330x186]


Came to say that. Thanks, calbert.
 
2013-01-17 11:23:11 PM

Smeggy Smurf: thecpt: Good. Now do it for architects.

I'm an architect and I approve of this.

/made plenty of money fixing what other "architects" did


Well, I'm an engineer and, uh... nevermind. You can see where this is going.
 
2013-01-17 11:23:48 PM
calbert



and another culprit for the increasingly demanding customer is the home improvement tv shows. your Mike Holmes and Ty Pennington and Trading Places and Bath Crashers, Extreme Makeover, Flip This House... DIY network and HGTV shows are giving customers an unrealistic expectation of what is actually involved in doing a project, doing it right, doing it within budget, and doing it within a reasonable time.


THIS. My wife watches those shows all the time & drives me absolutely bug fark with "You should do this",like when I was building an 8 foot wide deck extension & she says "I saw that you're supposed to put a half bubble slant on it so the water runs off"
Had to show her how much slant that was on 8 feet & the fact that it's a WOOD deck with 1/4" spaces SO THAT WATER RUNS OFF!
 
2013-01-17 11:23:58 PM

freetomato: sxacho: It's easy. Don't do any work for anyone from New York or New Jersey. They expect to get cheated and they will cheat you first instead so as to be the cheater and not the cheatee.

/Florida generalizations are accurate generalizations

When I lived in CT I had a friend who was a chimney sweep, a pretty rare specialty. He went to Long Island and swept the Billy Joel/Christie Brinkley chimney. BJ laid low - welcomed him and disappeared. CB skulked suspicously, screeched at BJ from across the compound, and treated Paul like an indentured servant. He told me she was less beautiful afterward, if you can believe that.


Did Paul have the chimney sweep hat?
 
2013-01-17 11:24:19 PM

Jument: >> Posts complain of 'cheap-skates' and people who watch contractors while they work

What's wrong with watching your contractor? As long as you don't start stroking your wang, it seems reasonable to me. I've never done it myself but if the job was tricky or I was worried about the contractor's skillz I would watch him (or her, fap).


I've helped installing wooden flooring with a customer that stood over us questing each length, shade, grade of flooring we installed. At one point he was complaining about our use of darker pieces believing that they were not of the same type (species) of wood. It was when he went back into the completed flooring and questioning whether some of the earlier wood was properly matched that we finally called it a day through the first third and requested that he pick out all the wood (not already installed) that he felt did not match correctly, or he believed was of a different species and that we would return the next day to install the remaining pieces.

We returned the next day only to find him more distraught the next day as he had kept only about 1/3 of the wood from each box and had tried to return the rest only to find that the wood was indeed the same spieces and that none of it would retain it's current color once exposed to sunlight- present color being a nonissue.

He backed off for the next third of the install, but started in again thinking that we were wasting wood intentionally by cutting some of the longer ones shorter (neglecting to note that we would go back to the "scrap" as we filled in smaller end pieces or started the next row). He also claimed to find a "damaged" piece that appeared to have had something dragged across it since the install as the neighboring board shared some similar damage- so we had to cut both the offending boards and replace them. That being done, he wanted to with hold his payment until he had time to inspect the completed work.

Next day he said he would pay us- minus the cost of the scrap he had consolidated, packed back into the boxes and attempted to return to the flooring store. Doesn't matter that the store posts a sign reminding customers that up to 20% of a box was typically damaged, or had minor defects that had passed through factory inspectors. Nor did it matter that we had told him up front that we would not be responsible for that same 20% per box which usually was leftover in the form of scrap and defective material.

Took us forever to get him to compensate us for the cost of the 3 leftover boxes- and that was because we threatened to put a lean on his house for failure to pay.

I don't mind customers who poke their heads in at the end of the day to check out a project- I generally request that they wait until I get at least 75% of the job completed - but only after they've been given a chance to voice any concerns up front. Many jobs, such as tile installs or room additions, are just too damned ugly to be viewed at certain stages so it is preferable that the customer wait it out and trust that you will do the job they paid you to do.
 
2013-01-17 11:24:28 PM

SevenizGud: The rationale behind watching the workers do their jobs is simple: I am smart, and practically everyone else on the planet is a blithering retard.

It doesn't matter if I have never done wiring, or plumbing, or whatever else the case may be. I know that presumption of retardedness is universal. I know that if I am not there, they will make a lot of totally stupid, and even inexplicable mistakes. The fact that this is their profession, and they have been doing it for 25 years has NOTHING to do with it. They are still stupid.

So while I am there, I can reduce the number of stupid things done by others somewhat.

Just some examples from years gone by:

A. Hey, Mr. Electrician dude running the new outlet for the clothes dryer. Congrats on putting the box on an interior wall. I was trying to decide whether I wanted to just vent the exhaust indoors, or run the dryer cord across to the other side of the closet.

B. Hey, Mr. Bathtub surround installer dude, you know the lower gasket has a crease in it. Hmmm, maybe there's a reason for that. Have you ever wondered why that might be? No? No foolin'?

C. Hey, Mr. Toilet tank float engineer dude, you see this place where the threads from the drop-rod are? You know, the place where the walls are the thinnest. Where do you imagine would be the worst possible spot for attachment of the dipping prong? And where did you put it.

D. Hey, Mr. Kitchen sink sprayer assembler dude, when you push on the spray diverter, which fulcrum do you imagine takes the most force? So, where would you like to support the fulcrum with a whopping 2mm of useless-grade plastic. No kidding?

E. Hey, Mr. Kitchen door weather strip installer dude, which side of the door do you imagine would be best to install the strip to keep the rain out?

F. Hey, Mr. contracted landscaper worker, about how far away from the structure do you imagine you need to buzzkill ALL that grows with a weedeater before you can call your job good? Oh, about 2 feet should do. Yes, there will be nothing growing near that building, that's for sure.

G. ...list goes on forever....


And you do not do this work yourself, instead of hiring someone inferior.... why, Mr Delicate Hands?
 
2013-01-17 11:24:31 PM

calbert: and another culprit for the increasingly demanding customer is the home improvement tv shows. your Mike Holmes and Ty Pennington and Trading Places and Bath Crashers, Extreme Makeover, Flip This House... DIY network and HGTV shows are giving customers an unrealistic expectation of what is actually involved in doing a project, doing it right, doing it within budget, and doing it within a reasonable time.


Truer words could not be spoken. I watch those from time to time and I always make internal bets with myself about what fell apart first (after the TV crews left).
 
2013-01-17 11:24:47 PM

skwerl: Long ago I learned (from others who knew the score) that half of your potential clients will take up 90% of your time and generate 10% of your income. After 30 years I've taken it to heart and have told many potential clients that I'm not interested in their job/ too busy/ too far away/ whatever. I rarely feel any regret walking away from a job bid.

On the other hand, once I agree to do a job then I'll keep my word regardless of what it takes. I've gone so far as to order the customer off my jobsite until I'm finished. They can come inspect once I'm done.


This is true of MMO players as well. Not sure of exact percentages so I'll just make some up, but something like 10% of the player base generates 80% of the complaints/trouble for the people who maintain and update the game.

I can believe that there really are customers you'd be better off without.
 
2013-01-17 11:29:29 PM

freetomato: And you do not do this work yourself, instead of hiring someone inferior.... why, Mr Delicate Hands?


Oh yeah, grunt labor. I'd be delighted. Should I also tote the shingles onto the roof?
 
2013-01-17 11:30:32 PM

W.C.fields forever: freetomato: sxacho: It's easy. Don't do any work for anyone from New York or New Jersey. They expect to get cheated and they will cheat you first instead so as to be the cheater and not the cheatee.

/Florida generalizations are accurate generalizations

When I lived in CT I had a friend who was a chimney sweep, a pretty rare specialty. He went to Long Island and swept the Billy Joel/Christie Brinkley chimney. BJ laid low - welcomed him and disappeared. CB skulked suspicously, screeched at BJ from across the compound, and treated Paul like an indentured servant. He told me she was less beautiful afterward, if you can believe that.

Did Paul have the chimney sweep hat?


Yes, he did. Hope he still wears that bowler hat and is doing well. Good guy - lost touch with him.
 
2013-01-17 11:31:02 PM

ArkAngel: RatMaster999: Not Alw

One of my daily-visited sites.

/my proposal to my fiancee took second place in the Not Always Romantic story of the year contest
//Triforce of Love


That's awesome! Somehow, I missed knowing about that site. Guess I know what I'll be reading all night.
 
2013-01-17 11:31:44 PM
Oh, and for those who hate the people checking in on you I just don't get it. I worked as basically an IT consultant for years, and while it was rare I had people who'd find reasons to watch me work. I didn't really care. If someone wants to watch me wait for a machine to reimage itself or see how I go about doing the cable management for some workstations whatever. If they offered to help with anything I could always find some menial task for them to do that would just save me time later. They weren't going to do anything interesting, but if they want to take out some trash for me or grab me some water, awesome. I get home sooner, they feel useful, everybody wins. As long as they weren't asking me a question every five minutes I didn't mind them watching at all.

Then again, the only contractors I typically have in my place are either my landlord's hire (in which case if I'm watching them, it's because I don't trust my landlord and has paid off) or because a service provider (oil/gas/cable) requires them to do the work in which case all I know is that I might trust your boss, but I don't know you.

I try to be nice about it, stay out of the way, and occupy myself with my cell phone or something (usually reading Fark), but if I didn't hire you directly I probably just don't trust you. Nothing personal, I've just had stuff stolen by someone a landlord let into my apartment. I always offer that if I can help with anything to let me know, but unless the person doing the work is chatting me up, I just try to stay out of the way while making sure my shiat isn't getting stolen.

/plus if you're cool i typically try to make up for it by offering a beer and/or some food, especially if the job takes a while
 
2013-01-17 11:33:25 PM

freetomato: W.C.fields forever: freetomato: sxacho: It's easy. Don't do any work for anyone from New York or New Jersey. They expect to get cheated and they will cheat you first instead so as to be the cheater and not the cheatee.

/Florida generalizations are accurate generalizations

When I lived in CT I had a friend who was a chimney sweep, a pretty rare specialty. He went to Long Island and swept the Billy Joel/Christie Brinkley chimney. BJ laid low - welcomed him and disappeared. CB skulked suspicously, screeched at BJ from across the compound, and treated Paul like an indentured servant. He told me she was less beautiful afterward, if you can believe that.

Did Paul have the chimney sweep hat?

Yes, he did. Hope he still wears that bowler hat and is doing well. Good guy - lost touch with him.


Check the chimneys for Paulie The Hat!!!!
 
2013-01-17 11:35:22 PM

sxacho: Smeggy Smurf: thecpt: Good. Now do it for architects.

I'm an architect and I approve of this.

/made plenty of money fixing what other "architects" did

Well, I'm an engineer and, uh... nevermind. You can see where this is going.


I see you've met the architects that think skyhooks can help their pretty picture be built.
 
2013-01-17 11:36:51 PM

W.C.fields forever: freetomato: sxacho: It's easy. Don't do any work for anyone from New York or New Jersey. They expect to get cheated and they will cheat you first instead so as to be the cheater and not the cheatee.

/Florida generalizations are accurate generalizations

When I lived in CT I had a friend who was a chimney sweep, a pretty rare specialty. He went to Long Island and swept the Billy Joel/Christie Brinkley chimney. BJ laid low - welcomed him and disappeared. CB skulked suspicously, screeched at BJ from across the compound, and treated Paul like an indentured servant. He told me she was less beautiful afterward, if you can believe that.

Did Paul have the chimney sweep hat?


No, but he's as lucky as lucky can be.
 
2013-01-17 11:40:07 PM

W.C.fields forever: Yes.Exactly..The customer that asks what can I do to help? I say go take in a movie..go shopping.It's a lovely day at the beach..One lady asked can I get you anything? I told her she could cook me a potroast..About 4 hours later I smelled potroast..That was awesome.


I try to be that kind of client.

Am I an asshole client by hanging around because I'm curious about how the stuff you're doing works? Even if I have no skill at it, I'm always wondering how things like furnaces, plumbing and wiring and such functions. Probably why I can get sucked into episodes of This Old House so easily...
 
kab
2013-01-17 11:44:15 PM

SevenizGud: Oh yeah, grunt labor. I'd be delighted. Should I also tote the shingles onto the roof?


I don't know... do you want it done right?

It's pretty simple. If you think you can tackle a job, and the cost of tools is a ton less than hiring someone else, DIY. If you think you don't have the know-how, hire someone.

If you're paying someone else to do simple shiat, and then complaining that it's not done right, you have no one to blame but yourself.
 
2013-01-17 11:45:16 PM

RatMaster999: W.C.fields forever: Yes.Exactly..The customer that asks what can I do to help? I say go take in a movie..go shopping.It's a lovely day at the beach..One lady asked can I get you anything? I told her she could cook me a potroast..About 4 hours later I smelled potroast..That was awesome.

I try to be that kind of client.

Am I an asshole client by hanging around because I'm curious about how the stuff you're doing works? Even if I have no skill at it, I'm always wondering how things like furnaces, plumbing and wiring and such functions. Probably why I can get sucked into episodes of This Old House so easily...


Not at all.I have no problem with questions.check in every hour for like 10 minutes.Its all good.
 
2013-01-17 11:48:04 PM
people watch the contractors work so they don't steal everything that isn't bolted down. You're letting a stranger into your house with hardly any references at all. It's not like the police will do anything if they walk away with some valuable items and do a shiatty job.
 
2013-01-17 11:48:34 PM
oh and I can't wait for the days where audio and video recording equipment will be attached to the contractor/ worker and recording every minute that they're working in your house.

My brother (and his crew, and sometimes I) have been blamed for:

misplaced items that the homeowners think were stolen.

cracked tile in a unused 3rd floor bathroom when we've strictly been working in the basement.

oil stains on the driveway when we parked on the street.

stolen Netflix movies from the mailbox.

food missing from fridge.

TiVo, DVR, or any other household audio/video equipment tampered with.

bath towels used...

the list goes on and on. some people gots the crazy. but they also gots the money and are willing to pay someone to do the work.
 
2013-01-17 11:53:48 PM

coalition: The more complaints that they have about their customers, the worse they are as a contractor.
The more they don't want to be watched, the more they are trying to lie and cheat.

You want a good contractor? Find one who is proud of the work they're doing as they do it, and who has the ethical and common sense business practices to satisfy both his business needs and his customers.



I left the business after growing tired of constantly fighting for my money and being badmouthed by ignorant assholes who don't want to listen. Being a residential contractor is a lot like being a doctor or a lawyer (except for the money lol) - you need a LOT of very specialized knowledge that doesn't translate very well to the common person's understanding.

And one of the biggest reasons people end up feeling like their doctor or their lawyer failed them is because they didn't listen to them. I've had a couple of friends chewed up in divorce court because they wouldn't heed their lawyer's advice to have NO CONTACT with their ex - they disregard that, end up giving the other side all sorts of molehills to build into mountains in court and they lose - and then they rail about their lawyer having not done a thing except take their money. Boo Hoo.

I've worked in grading, with an old school cabinetmaker and casework man, as a framer, roofer and plumber's helper. I have knowledge that the average homeowner does not. But I don't get paid like a doctor so they can ignore what I say and just hope to fark me in the end if they don't like it because I need any work in this economy and they know it.

I had one couple who wanted crown and chair throughout. NP. Except for the two rooms that were part of an addition executed so poorly that there were 1/2" cracks in places where the walls and the ceiling met. I know a lot of tricks in running moulding, none that applied to those rooms. I told them that the walls were so uneven that any moulding job would either look like total crap or cost them so much in my labor and wasted materials. I also pointed out that cracks that large were indicative of serious structural issues that required attention. Then I got the Upsell Vibe, like they think I'm just trying to trick them into a bigger job and rip them off. "No, just do the best you can to cover those cracks, we'll look at that later.", he told me.

Before I started the work, I wrote an email that would serve as our contract. In that email I noted the two rooms and the customer's desire to cover the cracks cosmetically without regard to the appearance of the moulding or the underlying structural issues in the end. I stated that gaps as large as 1/4" were likely to appear in the corners due to the walls and ceiling being out in every plane and the customer's desire to keep costs down. I even made mention of the owner using the term "quick and dirty" in regard the moulding in those rooms.

I sent the "contract" and a list of materials along and we banged out the whole house pretty quick, saving the "funhouse" rooms for last. I don't do "quick and dirty", unless it's for a corporate client and they ask for just that. I won't come into your house and do bad work, it's just not in me. Anybody who has learned how to hang moulding correctly has a sense of pride in it. So we did the best we could - I had my guys save all the cutoff ends from the rest of the house and we made little dummy pieces cut at angles which varied from a standard compound miter cut and noted those differences on the back of each piece and then we played at putting the puzzle together the best we could.

It came out far better than I had hoped. The corners looked great, but the runs were downright serpentine, being attached to serpentine walls and all. But the runs were firmly bedded (we relieved them as best we could with a belt sander on the backside). So they got eight pieces of crown, hung in rooms that had never heard the words plumb, level or square, with near stain grade mitered corners and custom reliefs for a solid bed and they paid for "quick and dirty".

Guess what? All they wanted to talk about when the Final Bill came due was how different the crown in those two rooms looked from the rest of the house. I call it End Of Job Syndrome, when they start clutching their purse and suddenly becoming very interested in the work you have been doing in their home, for a week.

I referred to my email, our contract essentially, and explained that I actually went above and beyond what I quoted in order to not leave them the complete mess I told them it would otherwise be. And that I was eating that. He saw that. She did not. I got paid and He even asked me to look at what was wrong under those rooms. I explained that I'd already looked (to make sure my guys don't fall through some dubious floor) and the additional rooms were supported by 4x4 piers on stacks of stone, with not nearly enough of either in places.

By that point, there was no way I was getting involved in a structural issue with Her and I gave them the number for a Mexican guy who does foundation work. They never called him. If He hadn't been there, I would not have been paid in full. I know that because of all the other jobs where I was not paid as promised.

I had so many problems with EOJ Syndrome that I got away from working for people I do not know. At this point, my customer needs the referral.
 
2013-01-17 11:53:59 PM

calbert: oh and I can't wait for the days where audio and video recording equipment will be attached to the contractor/ worker and recording every minute that they're working in your house.


I'm surprised nobody's made an app for that. With a Bluetooth head-mounted camera it seems like something lots of professions could save a lot of hassle by using.
 
2013-01-18 12:00:00 AM

sethen320: vudukungfu: As an upholsterer, I had a one legged client who had issues with his personal fart catcher.
I mad his seat and he biatched about it, and would not pay me.
So I visited him and asked what the problem was.
He was telling me all about his ass pain and I hoisted up his good leg and pulled the fart catcher out and said, "Well, then. Good day to you, sir", and left.

Bastard was on the floor rolling about screaming he would sue me.

Fark him.

I did a tuck and roll and buttons and head to head tacks and he was biatching about it?
Fark him, and would not assist again....

Dipshiat shouldn't have been napping his drunken ass on the tracks in the first place.
/or maybe it was not paying his track bets.
//It was RI, so either way.
///used it in a Chihuahua whelping box the nest week.

Wtf is a fart catcher?

Can you make extras for the kids in Mississippi?


It's a seat cushion.
 
2013-01-18 12:04:02 AM
I've been on both ends of this issue.

My wife and I subscribe to Angie's List. All of my reviews have been positive because I've gotten great work done.

On Ebay, I sold a camera that was listed as non-working and went into detail about what happened when it stopped working. A guy swooped in at the end of the auction to bid on it, didn't read the title or the description, then trashed my rating complaining that I was a fraud and sold him junk.

All but two of my Yelp reviews were positive. One was for a Mexican restaurant that was terrible. Just awful. And I go to all types of Mexican restaurants and there was nothing redeemable here.
 
2013-01-18 12:05:34 AM
Spent the past 5 years in the trades and yeah, there are some shady people in it.

There are also jerk clients - people who think that if we 'reduce' the price of an insurance job that 1) the insurance company will like them and 2) not raise their rates.
Fools

Or how about the people that you spent 8 months discussing their kitchen remodel and they *still* can't make up their minds?

Glad I'm out.
 
2013-01-18 12:07:05 AM
The site name sounds very pornish.
 
2013-01-18 12:07:20 AM

calbert: oh and I can't wait for the days where audio and video recording equipment will be attached to the contractor/ worker and recording every minute that they're working in your house.

My brother (and his crew, and sometimes I) have been blamed for:

misplaced items that the homeowners think were stolen.

cracked tile in a unused 3rd floor bathroom when we've strictly been working in the basement.

oil stains on the driveway when we parked on the street.

stolen Netflix movies from the mailbox.

food missing from fridge.

TiVo, DVR, or any other household audio/video equipment tampered with.

bath towels used...

the list goes on and on. some people gots the crazy. but they also gots the money and are willing to pay someone to do the work.


I have seen people leave a dollar on the table,just to see if we will take it.All the change i find on the floor to the penny I leave on a table.

A helper took an orange once..There were 8 oranges when we left for work.Now theres 7.

As a flooring guy..By then numerous trades have been thru the house and they become trustworthy with the guys.
 
2013-01-18 12:08:40 AM

marcre3363: One was for a Mexican restaurant that was terrible. Just awful. And I go to all types of Mexican restaurants and there was nothing redeemable here.


Was it called Frontera? Applebee's Mexican experiment. Just awful offal.
 
2013-01-18 12:15:26 AM
I just fell for the old "I'm a ticketed plumber in another jurisdiction" trick, so I'm getting a kick out of this.

&#*$er (won't dignify him with the title "Farker") charged me $450 to ruin $300 worth of fittings and pipe. I count nine code violations, and that's what I can identify myself without help from the building inspector.

Lesson: always watch the contractor.
 
2013-01-18 12:20:48 AM

douchebag/hater: Spent the past 5 years in the trades and yeah, there are some shady people in it.

There are also jerk clients - people who think that if we 'reduce' the price of an insurance job that 1) the insurance company will like them and 2) not raise their rates.
Fools

Or how about the people that you spent 8 months discussing their kitchen remodel and they *still* can't make up their minds?

Glad I'm out.


Don't even get me started about Amateur Kitchen Designers. Those farkers will wear you out. I learned old school cabinetry, and build a very solid cabinet, not just the part you see. But these matherfarkers want to wave a Home Depot Kitchen Design in 3D in my face and ask me why I can't do it for the Home Depot price. Because it's cardboard Kraft-Maid crap with lithographed wood grain glued to cardboard and I don't have the factory to do that. I always suggest they go look at the sample kitchens in Home Depot, judge for themselves how long they have been there and to look at how a Kraft-Maid kitchen really holds up.
 
2013-01-18 12:21:05 AM

Insatiable Jesus: marcre3363: One was for a Mexican restaurant that was terrible. Just awful. And I go to all types of Mexican restaurants and there was nothing redeemable here.

Was it called Frontera? Applebee's Mexican experiment. Just awful offal.


No, it was a local place. I was SO excited because it was in walking distance of home.

Terrible chips and salsa. Margaritas were pure mix, no alcohol. And when the brought my my fajitas, it was what appeared to be horse meat and the platter was so hot that it was burning the meat. I had to stop eating at one point and turn all of the plate because the meat was burning and smelled awful.

On that note, I did view all of the Yelp reviews for my favorite Mexican place. The negative reviews were about the service and the mediocrity of the food. I laughed because they were right. But whenever I go there, it's all the same regulars and we're all treated fine. The chips and salsa are great, the margaritas are potent and the menu specialties are the bomb.
 
2013-01-18 12:21:36 AM

Insatiable Jesus: marcre3363: One was for a Mexican restaurant that was terrible. Just awful. And I go to all types of Mexican restaurants and there was nothing redeemable here.

Was it called Frontera? Applebee's Mexican experiment. Just awful offal.


I'm hoping Plaza Azteca. A chain that's awful.
 
2013-01-18 12:23:23 AM
In CCCP, contractor watch you.
 
2013-01-18 12:25:14 AM

kab: It's pretty simple. If you think you can tackle a job, and the cost of tools is a ton less than hiring someone else, DIY. If you think you don't have the know-how, hire someone.

If you're paying someone else to do simple shiat, and then complaining that it's not done right, you have no one to blame but yourself.


Or I could just point out to them that they are screwing up when they are and I am around. I don't have enough arms and hands to be everywhere at once, or I would do the jobs myself. Just like I would change my own oil, except that I can make 10x the amount in the same time it takes to change it. So I have Manuel do it.
 
2013-01-18 12:29:32 AM

freetomato: When I lived in CT I had a friend who was a chimney sweep, a pretty rare specialty. He went to Long Island and swept the Billy Joel/Christie Brinkley chimney. BJ laid low - welcomed him and disappeared. CB skulked suspicously, screeched at BJ from across the compound, and treated Paul like an indentured servant. He told me she was less beautiful afterward, if you can believe that.


Well, that's what you gotta expect from an uptown girl.
 
2013-01-18 12:36:17 AM
The best contractors I've dealt with don't sit around surfing sites like this. Problem solved. Now, GBTW. I am web-camming yo arse.
 
2013-01-18 12:39:51 AM
calbert: oh and I can't wait for the days where audio and video recording equipment will be attached to the contractor/ worker and recording every minute that they're working in your house.

There is a lot down the block from my house with a partially dug foundation and mounds of dirt. The owner wanted a foundation dug and hired a contractor. He then sat on a shed roof with a clip board and a stopwatch and timed exactly when the guys were working and when they stopped. When the contractor tried to get paid for the portion he'd done, as was in the contract, the guy refused to pay and presented the numbers he had taken. The contractor walked off the job and told the other contractors in town. Because we are a small isolated city, it didn't take long till the customer couldn't find anyone willing to make a contract. The partial hole has been there for 7 years now.

I've been having some work done on my house, and have found a contractor I feel I can trust. The only time I watch closely is when they find something new and unexpected about the house (the North wall is 4 inches wider than the East wall, this window was put in without a frame, etc...), and that is so I can facebook it. Our house was built in stages by people with widely varying skill. Most had more enthusiasm than knowledge, so we find some really interesting ways of doing things.
 
2013-01-18 12:45:24 AM
I have an awesome contractor, he's not cheap but he does good work and fast.
http://www.devengenzo.com/index.html
 
2013-01-18 12:51:49 AM

Your Average Witty Fark User: So now if I try to get their best price, I'm a shiatty client?

I generally only contact companies if they do something well. For example, last month my wife and I had the best waitress we've ever had in our lives. I made it a point to tell her, tip her accordingly, tell the manager, and I contacted the company directly. When something doesn't work out so well, I chalk it up to "shiat happens", and I move on. However, if I ever find my info on this site, you can be goddamned sure I'm going to burn the internet down in my attempt to slaughter the reputation of the asshole who's doing the same to me.


You're not a shiatty client for getting the best price, you're a shiatty client when you leverage other bids to try to get someone who is desperate for their rent money to lowball themselves into work so you can save a couple bucks. You get what you pay for in the construction business. Want it cheap? Expect 9 illegals there to do your drywall in 1 day. Yes it's done, but god help you on the quality.

/not union, either.
 
2013-01-18 12:53:27 AM
My small town is full of "something for nothings" and rip-off artists. Recently fixed a PC, customer complained was still getting blue screen. Looked if over, couldn't reproduce blue screen, and nothing in the logs. Happens two more times. Asked him to photo blue screen, doesn't, then comes in saying he wants his money back, only in cash when he paid with a credit card. Nope, refund on credit card only. He, conveniently, didn't bring it. Finally give him his money back and told him to never come back. He got all beligerent and we threatened to call the cops on him and he left. Town is full of assholes like this.
 
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