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(Parity News)   Korean scientists say new flexible polymer electrolyte is what plants crave - especially plants that want bendable batteries for their consumer electronics   (paritynews.com) divider line 17
    More: Spiffy, plants, polymer electrolyte, Korean, electrolytes, Institute of Science, rechargeable batteries, electronics, Korean scientists  
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1312 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Jan 2013 at 6:46 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-16 06:53:51 PM
That sounds very interesting. Particularly the part where it's not horribly expensive to implement the process.
 
2013-01-16 07:12:52 PM
It's got electrolytes?
 
2013-01-16 07:22:27 PM
Mmmmm.... Brawndo...
 
2013-01-16 07:49:31 PM
>no mention of comparative energy density
It's all well and good as long as it holds more than current technologies. If your tradeoff is much less battery capacity no consumer will really care if it's flexible.
 
2013-01-16 08:16:18 PM
The Windup Girl meets Idiocracy?

I'm trying to handle this.

I'm not doing very well.
 
2013-01-16 08:33:30 PM

Mechanicum: It's all well and good as long as it holds more than current technologies. If your tradeoff is much less battery capacity no consumer will really care if it's flexible.


Not sure about starting capacity, but I would assume the increased stability would have an impact on capacity over the duration of increased battery life.
 
2013-01-16 11:41:07 PM
You're welcome.
 
2013-01-16 11:50:41 PM
So, uh... okay, this is cool, but what kind of consumer electronics need to be able to bend?  All I can think of are things that little kids are going to treat brutally, maybe some kinds of sex toys, and those little "fitness bracelet" things.  I don't really want my phone, TV, clock, radio, laptop, or anything else to get all Persistence of Memory on me.  What am I missing?
 
2013-01-17 12:38:13 AM

dbirchall: So, uh... okay, this is cool, but what kind of consumer electronics need to be able to bend?  All I can think of are things that little kids are going to treat brutally, maybe some kinds of sex toys, and those little "fitness bracelet" things.  I don't really want my phone, TV, clock, radio, laptop, or anything else to get all Persistence of Memory on me.  What am I missing?


Despite you not wanting it, Samsung is hoping to release a flexible screen smartphone, and they are hoping for this year (they were hoping for last year too, but that didn't work out so well

And before you ask why you'd want a flexible screen smartphone when the logic board isn't, imagine having a small phone, maybe the size of a fat pen, and imagine that the screen, should you want/need it, could be unrolled from it, or perhaps held on both ends by solid "posts" that would house the electronics, but telescope apart to reveal the screen

These, if done properly, could be really nice. If done in a half assed way (as it pertains to usability), which to be fair Samsung sucks at good UX design (especially on the first iteration) it could suck donkey balls
 
2013-01-17 01:20:44 AM
24.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-01-17 01:38:29 AM

the_sidewinder: imagine having a small phone, maybe the size of a fat pen, and imagine that the screen, should you want/need it, could be unrolled from it, or perhaps held on both ends by solid "posts" that would house the electronics, but telescope apart to reveal the screen


Honestly, I don't really find pens any more convenient to carry in my pockets than small phones, but I suppose everyone has their own tastes.
 
2013-01-17 01:51:33 AM

Vangor: Mechanicum: It's all well and good as long as it holds more than current technologies. If your tradeoff is much less battery capacity no consumer will really care if it's flexible.

Not sure about starting capacity, but I would assume the increased stability would have an impact on capacity over the duration of increased battery life.


My initial thought was that meant that they could fit in some tight spaces - lining cars, wherever there is space in the electronic, etc. While the FlexiFone(tm) sounds awesome and all, the implications are definitely far reaching, if, as you note, it can hold a GD charge.

Batteries have always been pretty ridged, bulky things and haven't made the same major leaps on as other technology but they will and have to catch up.
 
2013-01-17 06:02:12 AM
and not a single picture of a very bendable Korean =(
 
2013-01-17 11:31:39 AM

Uchiha_Cycliste: and not a single picture of a very bendable Korean =(


I was kind of enjoying the lack of racism for a change... :)


/bring it!
 
2013-01-17 01:11:49 PM

lyanna96: Uchiha_Cycliste: and not a single picture of a very bendable Korean =(

I was kind of enjoying the lack of racism for a change... :)


/bring it!


how could that possibly be racist? I mean it's possibly misogynistic, definitely implying I'd like to see
pictures of pretty, flexible Korean women, but racist? Never!
 
2013-01-17 07:19:51 PM
We already have flexible electrolyte batteries. They're called nonspillable gel-cell lead acid, used all over the place where you don't want liquid sulfuric acid sloshing around. The electrolyte is trapped in a gelatin between the lead plates.

The problem with gel cells is that they slowly lose water when charging, and eventually the gel shrinks and doesn't touch the plates properly anymore, and the battery capacity takes a sudden nosedive. Usually at the worst possible time.

Lithium ion batteries can outgas too. I don't see how their plasticized electrolyte is going to do anything to stop that.
 
2013-01-18 08:50:19 AM
.... ...disappointing thread is disappointing.
 
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