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(Time)   How Dr. Dre convinced the world that you need $300 headphones to listen to your highly compressed MP3s   (business.time.com) divider line 261
    More: Interesting, Dr Dre, Jimmy Iovine, market dominance, NPD Group, LL Cool J  
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9816 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Jan 2013 at 10:00 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-17 05:02:17 AM

TommyymmoT: Uchiha_Cycliste: In case you are wondering, you can't use hearing aids and ride a bike. You know that sound a speaker makes when you blow onto a microphone? It's like that, but a hundred times worse since the speaker is mm away from my ear drum.

Dayum. Thank you for sharing that, really. That never even crossed my mind.
I know that to be true, because when micing an outdoor concert, even a mild breeze across the mics sounds like thunder.
I carry a lot of thin sponge rubber, and tape for just that reason.


You are welcome. In addition, I think it's a common misconception that hearing aids are to hearing loss what glasses are to poor vision and it's quite wrong. The environments in which you can use the aids are really quite limited, especially when you consider that if they get wet they break too. Any wind makes them useless, any water is dangerous. In a loud or crowded room, like a restaurant they pick up whatever is loudest, not what you want to hear. And to top it all off, because they can only amplify a discreet number of frequencies and sound (especially music)is a continuous spectrum, you are not really hearing what is there; and music always sounds like ass with them in. Gotta take em out and turn up the volume. And I have REALLY nice hearing aids too, >$3000 each. (most insurance doesn't help at all, but that's changing as the Boomers need aids) The batteries are hella expensive $15/8 batteries. And I go through 1-2 batteries per week, per ear. With minimal usage. I only put them on when talking with coworkers. Maybe 5% of my work day; unless I have a meeting. Top it all off, it scares the hell out of me to ride my bike with them, just because/in case. So I generally leave them at work where I know I will need them. And am usually unaided at home.

The whole situation sucks, but it's sure better than not hearing. .
 
2013-01-17 05:51:12 AM
Sony MDR-V6. That is all.
 
2013-01-17 06:12:36 AM
I find it funny that full sized headphones are back in fashion. I stopped carrying them years ago because they were too much hassle (taking up space in my backpack, completely useless while jogging). None of that has changed, but a lot of people now carry them. Another fashion accessory I can do without.

/More than £15 for headphones? Outrageous!
 
2013-01-17 06:53:18 AM

hamfast gamgee: I find it funny that full sized headphones are back in fashion. I stopped carrying them years ago because they were too much hassle (taking up space in my backpack, completely useless while jogging). None of that has changed, but a lot of people now carry them. Another fashion accessory I can do without.

/More than £15 for headphones? Outrageous!


They are a pain and they do take up quite a lot of room in my bag, but for me it's worth it as I can't abide the feeling of earbuds or any other in-ear headphones. The smaller ones that only cover part of the ear let in too much noise from outside and are also slightly uncomfortable. So, full-size it is.

That, and having very obvious large headphones on is quite useful for giving out the message that I want to be left alone.
 
2013-01-17 07:09:02 AM

Gordon Bennett: hamfast gamgee: I find it funny that full sized headphones are back in fashion. I stopped carrying them years ago because they were too much hassle (taking up space in my backpack, completely useless while jogging). None of that has changed, but a lot of people now carry them. Another fashion accessory I can do without.

/More than £15 for headphones? Outrageous!

They are a pain and they do take up quite a lot of room in my bag, but for me it's worth it as I can't abide the feeling of earbuds or any other in-ear headphones. The smaller ones that only cover part of the ear let in too much noise from outside and are also slightly uncomfortable. So, full-size it is.

That, and having very obvious large headphones on is quite useful for giving out the message that I want to be left alone.


My problem is that I'm hooked on the sound of open-ear headphones (I even modded my Denons to make them open). Open ears are obviously bad for anything public, so I'm stuck using earbuds for any kind of public use.
 
2013-01-17 07:13:44 AM
Love my $80 Sony active noise cancelling earbuds. Very compact, excellent battery life, sound quality is pretty good, and the active noise cancelling is a great bonus as it effectively cuts out jet noise or ventilation noise. It was great on deployment as it cuts out most of the ambient noise on the ship, which is lways has some constant background noise. Not so good on transient sounds, though.
 
2013-01-17 07:38:57 AM
I can't hear you 'cause I've got these on.

images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com

They might not be the most comfortable, but put them on and all you'll hear is your music (or just your heartbeat if you're not playing anything).
 
2013-01-17 07:58:51 AM
Meh.

How I listen to music:

farm4.static.flickr.com

With a SACD player and in surround sound.
 
2013-01-17 08:04:12 AM
My 12 year old step-daughter wanted a pair of Beats by Dre headpones for Christmas, we bought her a $20 knockoff with some girly decorations on the side and she was thrilled. She shows them off to all of her friends, none of which can tell the difference anyway. It's funny to hear them talk about how much better everything sounds through them though.

Everybody is happy and we saved $280.
 
2013-01-17 08:10:21 AM

Seth'n'Spectrum: I'm an audiophile noob, but I can tell when an audio file is compressed comparing it to a .flac (end result of parents taking you to the symphony every month as a kid).
I got my first pair of non-default headphones last winter, Shure SE115s, for about $60. I'd like to get another pair; does anyone have suggestions for earbuds in a similar price range?

Got a Zune back when iPods didn't do lossless. For some reason, my uncompressed files still sound better played back on my computer with the same earbuds. Is the reason the hardware, or some physical thing (walking/standing/sitting)?


The playback hardware will make a huge difference due to the chipset used, as the way the file is uncompressed might be standard, but the sub-processing on how the file is played makes a huge impact on sound quality.

Most computers have either Creative labs (Sound Blaster), VIA, VGA, Gigabyte, etc. and depending on the quality of the board (if it's built-in) as opposed to a add-in card can also make a difference in reference to multi-channel, high-definition, or surround sound capabilities.

The same applies to portable players, for example: iPods/ Iphones are very mediocre at best, while the Creative Labs Zen or Sony (and other brands) have a much higher end sound quality. (Zune: Audio Chip Wolfram WM8978)

Testing several headphones with multiple players, the difference was huge, as in some headphones would sound bland or too high or too much bass on one player and then sound great on another.

So getting the best sound is NOT going to be about one particular headset, but more about finding the best headset for the particular player (or computer card) that you have.

If I compare my several devices to my phone (Palm Pre2) and tablet (HP Touchpad which has a very high end audio chipset, the Wolfson WN8958 with full high quality sound and full 3D sound capacity, which makes it one of the best sounding tablets out there, if not the best.), the difference is outstanding, via bluetooth, the sound quality from an older device sound like AM radio.

I have the older Zen VIsion M, which was (and still is) considered one of the best MP3 players ever made, and again, the difference between it and many other players is huge.

And if I plug in to my computer with a fairly high end Sound blaster chipset using my Sennheiser, the sound is quite amazing, but again, I need to use decent headphones that work well with the output. This doesn`t mean expensive, just quality which you should easily find in a 40-100$ range set.

There is a huge difference between an under 20$ headset and a (up to) 100$ (on average) one, but beyond that, it really becomes hazardous terrain to judge as I've yet to find a >100$ headset that I can say it worth it, or that they do generate a worthwhile improvement.
 
2013-01-17 08:10:50 AM

Lsherm: Luminiferous Aether: For those of you that have headphones that can truly benefit from it, I highly suggest getting an amplifier.

The hippy that writes for CNET's audio column is always going on about headphone amplifiers.  Of course, he's also always going on about turntables, too.  He gives the distinct impression that if reel to reel tapes were still manufactured, he'd review those, too.  He repeatedly uses words like: warmth, lively, responsive, subtle, lows, highs, and natural.


Fresh, NOS reel to reel tape IS still being manufactured. In fact, it out performs the old tape. Reel to reel beat sthe hell out of ANYTHING. It can even make mp3's sound slightly better. My 1960's Voice of Music record changer beats mp3 sound quality. It's always "what the hell just happened?" when going from digital to turntable. The turntable sounds so much more open and extended.

And yes there is something called extended range. Movie soundtracks have it once you get rid of the Home Theater in a Box and get a higher quality system. It's the sense of being in the room with the orchestra.

I'm not talking spending hundreds of thousands of dollars either. My home system uses a used Harmon Kardon AVR 250 Home Theater receiver/preamp, RCA tube theater amps from the 1960's, and Cerwin Vega e715 speakers, not audiophile by any stretch of the imagination, but I like the way they sound and the frequency response is good. I spent about 2,000 all together.

Mastering on new music is non existent. At least half of it overloaded. My roomie's kid (currently 11 years old) sometimes listens to 80's music, I'll occasionally play the 45 of the same song she's listening to, and she prefers the vinyl copy every time.
 
2013-01-17 08:26:50 AM

Abulafia: There are two completely different types of compression that are being referred to seemingly interchangeably in this thread. Let's just clear up a couple things here: the first occurrence of the word compression comes in the thread name. The compression being referred to here and in a number of the comments in the thread is data compression. This type of compression, used to squeeze a digital signal into a smaller number of bytes, was highly necessary in the early days of digital audio and -- among many other things -- allowed Apple to claim that you could put 1,000 songs in your pocket. They failed to mention that these thousand songs would sound vaguely like oatmeal.

These sorts of data compression algorithms were invented by some very clever people and are based on some fairly accurate psychacoustic masking models, so they are a little amazing in how much they can reduce a song's file size without massively impacting the signal quality... but wow the algorithms can do a real number on fidelity if pushed too hard (which they almost always are). This sort of compression also seems somewhat less necessary these days when portable music players could easily store >1,000 digitally uncompressed songs.


But there's an entirely different sort of compression that's being discussed elsewhere in the comments, namely dynamic range compression. This type of compression reduces the amplitude of the highest level signals and brings up the lowest level signals. It's necessary for LPs because of their inherent lack of a large dynamic range (the difference in the lowest level and highest level signals the record can reproduce). That said, a bit of compression can actually be very musical sounding.

Overuse of dynamic range compression, on the other hand, squashes the sound in a very unpleasant way, resulting in music that lacks dynamics.This makes the music simultaneously unexciting and very fatiguing to listen to. In a terrible turn of events, it also allows mixers and mast ...



No, the frequency response on vinyl is limited to the cartridge. The RIAA curve was to correct the lower bass frequencies because it can cause the needle to jump from the groove.

If you want an example of how bad digital can sound take of a copy of Train's Drop of Jupiter. This song is available as a 45. On my analog copy (I use a Shure V15 III cart with a tube preamp, nothing special, a Stromberg Carlson stereo 14 watt tube amp from the 60's) the cymbals at the toward the end of the song are so clear, you can hear the separate hits. MP3? the cymbals are static in the background.

I haven't heard the improved version of this yet, but on Dire Strait's Money for Nothing, there's an ENTIRE layer of sound effects missing from the digital version, than even my console level 1960's Airline Voice of Music changer picks up.
 
2013-01-17 08:34:02 AM
Recently bought some headphones and did a fair bit of research in my chosen price bracket. Reviews suggested Beats are double the price of equivalent headphones by established manufacturers.

I can also report that a decent set of phones do make a difference with music sourced from MP3s. I doubt most people could tell the difference between a CD and a high quality (320) MP3 file.
 
2013-01-17 08:34:32 AM
Hint: Everything is compressed in some way. Live shows even more so, unless you are talking about an acoustic act in a coffee house. In a live event you're lucky if you've got 40dB of dynamic range available.

Even the audio going to your precious vinyl was compressed at some point in the chain, often in the mastering. You'll get over it.
 
2013-01-17 08:37:21 AM

cannotsuggestaname: I have listened to music through some Beats headphones... and I'll take my Sennheiser 598's, for $100 less, any day of the week.


YES.
 
2013-01-17 08:46:55 AM

FlashHarry: it's sad; there's an entire generation that has never heard an uncompressed piece of music.


Actually, sometimes a little bit of compression can be useful - especially with a classical recording that has a few extreme peaks in an otherwise relatively quiet piece. Getting that to play at proper listening level would otherwise require a truly heroic sound system.

This is a good case for parallel compression, which mixes in a compressed signal at a lower level against the uncompressed signal. The result sounds like moving a few rows up in the concert hall, without killing the dynamic range. It's pretty fiddly, though, and easier to work with in post-processing (though it can be done on-the-fly with analog compressors).

Unfortunately, in pop music it has become standard practice to utterly crush any dynamic range and even intentionally boost the music into clipping, just to make the recording louder than everyone else's. Unfortunately, the result sounds like crap, and listening to it is tiring.

Back to the thread subject, I consider the phrase "Beats Audio" to be an "avoid this product" warning. It's a classic example of celebrity marketing. I'll give Dr. Dre partial credit for ditching the Monster Cable folks (Monster Cable is a separate rant), but that's about all.

/recording hobbyist
 
2013-01-17 08:55:00 AM
I have a set of iFrogz earbuds.  Crappy, I'm sure, but I like them.  But then again, while I wouldn't say I have
a tin ear, my ears are definitely not at all sensitive.

But, I rarely use them.  I do most of my listening in my car (the DC commute is good for something), and
ever since I got my iPod Touch, I've been using a short-range FM transmitter to go though my car stereo.
Currently, I'm using an old iTrip (yard sale find for 25 cents), and it works very well, though it took a lot of
finagling to find an FM frequency that would work reliably and its still subject to odd interference.

And on the occasions that I do listen at home, I have a couple of iPod docks that sound just fine.

/Mostly listens to podcasts anyway, so good sound reproduction is not a concern for me
//Sony headphones are the best.
 
2013-01-17 08:55:08 AM

Artcurus: No, the frequency response on vinyl is limited to the cartridge. The RIAA curve was to correct the lower bass frequencies because it can cause the needle to jump from the groove.


I don't want to start an argument here, but frequency response and dynamic range are two very different and totally independent things. The first is related to the reproducible range of frequencies and the second to the reproducible range of levels. Regardless of any possible differences in frequency response, a vinyl record has a lower dynamic range than a cd, period (typically by at least 50 dB). Mind you, I vastly prefer records! Give me groove hiss over nasty digital artifacts any day.

But this is beside the point, really. The point I was trying to make was that people in this thread were using the word "compression" to refer to two completely different things. It annoyed me a little. I tried to clear it up and probably only won +1 points for pedantry... We all lose today.
 
2013-01-17 08:56:01 AM

Fubegra: FlashHarry: it's sad; there's an entire generation that has never heard an uncompressed piece of music.

Actually, sometimes a little bit of compression can be useful - especially with a classical recording that has a few extreme peaks in an otherwise relatively quiet piece. Getting that to play at proper listening level would otherwise require a truly heroic sound system.

This is a good case for parallel compression, which mixes in a compressed signal at a lower level against the uncompressed signal. The result sounds like moving a few rows up in the concert hall, without killing the dynamic range. It's pretty fiddly, though, and easier to work with in post-processing (though it can be done on-the-fly with analog compressors).

Unfortunately, in pop music it has become standard practice to utterly crush any dynamic range and even intentionally boost the music into clipping, just to make the recording louder than everyone else's. Unfortunately, the result sounds like crap, and listening to it is tiring.



I used to rally against compression more than I do now. There nothing wrong with a little bit. Listening to classical recordings in the car actually makes me wish for a little more compression.
 
2013-01-17 09:23:47 AM

Coco LaFemme: I don't care if I'm listening to .mp3s, .wavs, .flacs, cassettes, or vinyl.....I'm not paying $300 for headphones.  I don't see how anyone could blow that kind of money on such a frivolous product.


Once you realize you are never going to own a home and will never be able to retire. it's an easy choice.
 
2013-01-17 09:26:48 AM

meatofmystery: Beyerdynamic + USB sound card= still less than the cost of sh*t Beats cans


Dingdingdingdingding! We have a winner! My go-to cans are the DT 770 Pro/80, and my second-in-line are Grado SR60. The Beyers are built like tanks - while the velour earpads no longer look new, they're as comfortable as ever, after five years of heavy use.

My usual listening setup involves an E-MU 0404 USB interface; wonderful sound, but it's now discontinued and no release-quality drivers are forthcoming for Windows 7 or later. Needless to say, I won't be buying anything more from Creative. A Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 is in my laptop bag (it works with Win7).

A good clue that a headphone maker actually knows what it's doing is when that company also makes professional microphones. Beyerdynamic, AKG, Shure, Sony, Audio-Technica, and Sennheiser all fit this criterion.

Koss and Grado don't fit this mold, but they're also good brands to consider, and I consider the Grado SR60 (or newer SR60i) to be the best deal in audio.
 
2013-01-17 09:42:18 AM

Fubegra: meatofmystery: Beyerdynamic + USB sound card= still less than the cost of sh*t Beats cans

Dingdingdingdingding! We have a winner! My go-to cans are the DT 770 Pro/80, and my second-in-line are Grado SR60. The Beyers are built like tanks - while the velour earpads no longer look new, they're as comfortable as ever, after five years of heavy use.

My usual listening setup involves an E-MU 0404 USB interface; wonderful sound, but it's now discontinued and no release-quality drivers are forthcoming for Windows 7 or later. Needless to say, I won't be buying anything more from Creative. A Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 is in my laptop bag (it works with Win7).

A good clue that a headphone maker actually knows what it's doing is when that company also makes professional microphones. Beyerdynamic, AKG, Shure, Sony, Audio-Technica, and Sennheiser all fit this criterion.

Koss and Grado don't fit this mold, but they're also good brands to consider, and I consider the Grado SR60 (or newer SR60i) to be the best deal in audio.


The Grado SR80i headphones are only about $20 more and totally worth it.
 
2013-01-17 09:51:58 AM

FlashHarry: it's sad; there's an entire generation that has never heard an uncompressed piece of music.


? I'm sure they've been to concerts.
 
2013-01-17 10:00:25 AM

Fubegra: Koss and Grado don't fit this mold, but they're also good brands to consider, and I consider the Grado SR60 (or newer SR60i) to be the best deal in audio.


I was a bit frustrated with Grado- I picked up a set of SR60i's a couple of years ago for practicing guitar (I play at night after the kids are in bed so no amp for me) and while they sound excellent, they developed a nasty buzz on one side when playing low notes- open E was especially bad. It sounded like something was rattling inside of them. I don't play especially loud, so it was a bit baffling.

I sent them back to Grado and they supposedly fixed them, but within a day or two the buzz was back. I didn't feel like spending the money to send them back again, so I'm just using a hand me down pair of Sony MDR-V6s now. Excellent phones- beat all to hell but they work perfectly.
 
2013-01-17 10:00:25 AM
I'd like to see some cheap earbuds that don't get hard wire.
 
2013-01-17 10:09:06 AM

vharshyde: Dre is not doing anything new. Skullcandy convinced people of the same dreck, using crappy little drivers in their headphones and selling at a markup. Just like the Monster cables that came before, their priduct actually sucks balls, but they are selling a brand on cognitive dissonance. People will buy them, and rather than admitting they got duped out of three hundred bucks, they will staunchly defend it so that they don't look like an absolute fool for being duped.


Uh, my Skullcandy buds cost $7. I'm sure they sell overpriced BS, but not everyone with Skullz is a rube. Some of us are cheapskates.
 
2013-01-17 10:10:48 AM

Seth'n'Spectrum: I'm an audiophile noob, but I can tell when an audio file is compressed comparing it to a .flac (end result of parents taking you to the symphony every month as a kid).
I got my first pair of non-default headphones last winter, Shure SE115s, for about $60. I'd like to get another pair; does anyone have suggestions for earbuds in a similar price range?

Got a Zune back when iPods didn't do lossless. For some reason, my uncompressed files still sound better played back on my computer with the same earbuds. Is the reason the hardware, or some physical thing (walking/standing/sitting)?


Somebody linked this site earlier. It's a good place to start your research. For me ear buds are all about finding the most comfortable ones, aka ones I don't notice are in. That ended up as some Klipsch S4 earbuds. Had some bookshelf Klipsch speakers I was always happy with so was happy to spend my money on a familiar brand. I've heard good things about Sennheiser (and many Farkers seem to be fans of their non-earbud headphones) but I have yet to try a pair.
 
2013-01-17 10:38:47 AM
I've always been rather partial to Beyer cans. I've got a DT 770 Pro pair for editing and mixdown as well as my favorite for Skyping and remote voiceovers:

www.cameratim.com

The Beyer DT 109. I can wear that pair for hours.

I also use a pair of Sony 7506s when I travel or do remote audio 'cause they sound great and fold up pretty well.

lohjinawi.com

As for earbuds, I go Shure.
 
Bf+
2013-01-17 10:46:30 AM
www.camvis.com
yo.
 
2013-01-17 10:50:03 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: [ecx.images-amazon.com image 300x300]

He's just taking it back.


Kind of like the indians and casinos.
 
2013-01-17 11:08:44 AM

dc0012c: I've always been rather partial to Beyer cans. I've got a DT 770 Pro pair for editing and mixdown as well as my favorite for Skyping and remote voiceovers:

[www.cameratim.com image 231x300]

The Beyer DT 109. I can wear that pair for hours.

I also use a pair of Sony 7506s when I travel or do remote audio 'cause they sound great and fold up pretty well.

[lohjinawi.com image 500x500]

As for earbuds, I go Shure.


You no wear glasses.
 
2013-01-17 11:14:45 AM
I have a pair of Sennheiser 558s that I like a lot. Usually I use them with my stereo or computer, but if I am listening to my mp3 player, I connect through a Travagans 'dog bone' amplifier. The sound is pretty good.

If I'm at the gym, I just wear a pair of $20 Koss headphones. Earbuds just don't stay in place when I run.
 
2013-01-17 12:04:16 PM
Maybe I wasn't paying close enough attention, but I haven't seen any love for Bowers and Wilkins in this thread. I got a set of their headphones six months back and take them everywhere. They're the best headphones I've ever had for limiting outside noise that weren't noise-cancellers. They're expensive, but I got mine for free. So, you know...
 
2013-01-17 12:17:12 PM
I'm honestly surprised that hipsters haven't flocked to Koss PortaPros yet: folding headphones with industrial design still the best that 1987 has to offer, but nonetheless the best-sounding audio you can buy for $40 at K-Mart.

But then maybe it's not just looking ridiculous that's important, but the combination of looking ridiculous and paying way too much for the privilege.
 
2013-01-17 12:33:46 PM
Umm..people were buying the Bose noise canceling headphones like crazy years before BBD.
 
2013-01-17 12:56:15 PM
FTFA: "If you're wearing a pair of Beats, it says, 'Music's really important in my life,' says Wood. "I've seen people wearing them at parties with hundreds of people, and they've got their Beats around their neck. It's no different than somebody wearing a Run DMC T-shirt and Adidas shoes, or the guy who always wears a Metallica T-shirt."

No, that is NOT the same. People normally wear shirts and shoes as their every day attire. The same cannot be said for a pair of headphones.
 
2013-01-17 01:00:10 PM
"I've seen people wearing them at parties with hundreds of people, and they've got their Beats around their neck. It's no different than somebody wearing a Run DMC T-shirt and Adidas shoes, or the guy who always wears a Metallica T-shirt."

All of those say you're a douche. You go to douche parties. Stop being a douche.
 
2013-01-17 01:04:30 PM

cannotsuggestaname: I have listened to music through some Beats headphones... and I'll take my Sennheiser 598's, for $100 less, any day of the week.


This; have a pair of MC5 from Etymotic Reasearch that were only $58. Best I've ever had. The only drawback is the FR, even then, it's the fault of Apple for having such sucky audio on their iPod touch.
 
2013-01-17 01:05:11 PM
spacebison.com
 
2013-01-17 01:06:32 PM

Coco LaFemme: I don't care if I'm listening to .mp3s, .wavs, .flacs, cassettes, or vinyl.....I'm not paying $300 for headphones.  I don't see how anyone could blow that kind of money on such a frivolous product.


Unless they have incredible sound quality, balance and durability then...no, you don't.
 
2013-01-17 01:06:52 PM
Headphones are for closers.
 
2013-01-17 01:10:58 PM
SkullCandy {greater than} Beats
 
2013-01-17 01:21:44 PM

thornhill: Meh.

How I listen to music:

[farm4.static.flickr.com image 334x500]

With a SACD player and in surround sound.


That must be a pain in the ass to take on the bus


coolmaterial.com

Not the best sound quality, but they look badass, I got 'em for $20, and the housing is aluminum with a kevlar-wrapped cord.

/You shouldn't be using headphones for anything other than monitoring anyway, if you work in studio production
 
2013-01-17 01:23:37 PM

poot_rootbeer: I'm honestly surprised that hipsters haven't flocked to Koss PortaPros yet: folding headphones with industrial design still the best that 1987 has to offer, but nonetheless the best-sounding audio you can buy for $40 at K-Mart.

But then maybe it's not just looking ridiculous that's important, but the combination of looking ridiculous and paying way too much for the privilege.


A design that has existed for over 25 years...and still beats the piss out of Dre's monstrosities.
 
2013-01-17 01:35:19 PM

Brainsick: thornhill: Meh.

How I listen to music:

[farm4.static.flickr.com image 334x500]

With a SACD player and in surround sound.

That must be a pain in the ass to take on the bus


[coolmaterial.com image 570x456]

Not the best sound quality, but they look badass, I got 'em for $20, and the housing is aluminum with a kevlar-wrapped cord.

/You shouldn't be using headphones for anything other than monitoring anyway, if you work in studio production


Headphones are only used for monitoring when there is no way to use speakers. And even when recordings are done outside of the studio, recording producers and engineers will always try to find a room large enough to setup 5 equidistant speakers.

Despite what some headphone fanatics believe, headphones are just about portability or inability to use speakers. Anyone who thinks they're getting "audiophile" sound from headphones is just delusional.
 
2013-01-17 01:49:11 PM

ScouserDuck: Umm..people were buying the Bose noise canceling headphones like crazy years before BBD.


You can try, but I refuse to associate BBD with anything but Bell Biv Devoe.
 
2013-01-17 01:57:12 PM
Pfffft...where will i put my Shakti stone?

/if you aren't listening to your vinyl using a moon stone rock needle, it sounds like shiat.
 
2013-01-17 02:08:57 PM
Mine, that I got for a little over $100. You can argue it's a waste to listen to MP3s on nice headphones if you like, but these sound much, much better than my old ones...and I'm listening to the same MP3s. Worth the money, IMO.

farm9.staticflickr.com
 
2013-01-17 02:35:10 PM
Right now I'm working on a project at work that involves cranking some of these babies to the 80KHz range.

www.stereophile.com

/Love my job.
 
2013-01-17 02:40:50 PM
This is how I roll....

a4.ec-images.myspacecdn.com
 
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