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(e! Science News)   Next time some teenager asks why learning math is so important, hit 'em with: "to improve the efficiency of teleportation" and see if that grabs their attention   (esciencenews.com) divider line 44
    More: Interesting, quantum teleportation, quantum teleportations, teleportation, applied mathematicses, quantum information, qubits, modern physics, action at a distance  
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2820 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Jan 2013 at 7:00 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-16 05:55:24 PM  
You don't need math for that. You just need to reconfooble the energymotron in order to boost power to the pattern buffer and make sure the Heisenberg compensators are set to prevent interference from particle fluctuations.
 
2013-01-16 06:12:33 PM  

fusillade762: You don't need math for that. You just need to reconfooble the energymotron in order to boost power to the pattern buffer and make sure the Heisenberg compensators are set to prevent interference from particle fluctuations.


I can tell you possess a keen scientifical mind. Of course, your weakness is assuming that the Heisenberg compensators could prevent interference, when researchstatisticians have made it clear that particle fluctuations are not an issue when Van Allen waves cross the tertiary threshold of subsonic orchestration.

/duh
 
2013-01-16 06:18:06 PM  
We have wizards for that. Get Ponder Stibbons on the horn!
 
2013-01-16 06:18:54 PM  
I was told there would be no mass
 
2013-01-16 07:04:26 PM  
wp.patheos.com.s3.amazonaws.com
 
2013-01-16 07:24:52 PM  
From the article it seems that they need a Heisenberg compensator.
 
2013-01-16 07:28:04 PM  
JS Bell would agree.
 
2013-01-16 07:28:22 PM  

SmackLT: fusillade762: You don't need math for that. You just need to reconfooble the energymotron in order to boost power to the pattern buffer and make sure the Heisenberg compensators are set to prevent interference from particle fluctuations.

I can tell you possess a keen scientifical mind. Of course, your weakness is assuming that the Heisenberg compensators could prevent interference, when researchstatisticians have made it clear that particle fluctuations are not an issue when Van Allen waves cross the tertiary threshold of subsonic orchestration.

/duh


The Heisenberg compensators don't prevent interference.  They're quite susceptible to it, in fact, which is why each transporter has three of them.
Subby, try reversing the polarity of the tachyon beam and see if that fixes yer problem.
 
2013-01-16 07:34:30 PM  

serial_crusher: SmackLT: fusillade762: You don't need math for that. You just need to reconfooble the energymotron in order to boost power to the pattern buffer and make sure the Heisenberg compensators are set to prevent interference from particle fluctuations.

I can tell you possess a keen scientifical mind. Of course, your weakness is assuming that the Heisenberg compensators could prevent interference, when researchstatisticians have made it clear that particle fluctuations are not an issue when Van Allen waves cross the tertiary threshold of subsonic orchestration.

/duh

The Heisenberg compensators don't prevent interference.  They're quite susceptible to it, in fact, which is why each transporter has three of them.
Subby, try reversing the polarity of the tachyon beam and see if that fixes yer problem.


Yes, but did you remember Cole's Law?
 
2013-01-16 07:42:39 PM  
Yeah, but when I ask my boy how long it will take to finish his homework, he just shouts "longer than you think, dad! Longer than you think!"
 
2013-01-16 07:45:27 PM  
When I told MIL I used algebra in my job, she said it was because "I was telling the computer what to do."

Indeed I am, but hopefully so are the rest of us, unless Skynet has become self-aware and taken control of my wife's mother.

//Not sure why they picked her, she sucks at math.
 
2013-01-16 07:58:33 PM  
As much of a Star Trek nerd I was as a lad, it bothered me that they used transporters simply as means to teleport around, and not its more obvious value as a means of immortality.

/And no, I didn't have many friends as a lad.
 
2013-01-16 08:00:01 PM  
But Geordi said the pattern buffers were already running at maximum efficiency.
 
2013-01-16 08:04:14 PM  
Would you use a teleporter if it meant the end of your consciousness but a continuation of an identical one wherever you teleported to?
 
2013-01-16 08:05:01 PM  
IT'S LONGER THAN YOU THINK!!!!!

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA ...

/claws out eyes
 
2013-01-16 08:08:37 PM  
Funbags: No no, in the future we'll live as long as now but have magical levels of technology. We'll explore a universe 14 billion light years across with a life-form that has at best two good decades between booting up and the decay of middle-age. Atoms, you see, have an age, and once a carbon atom has been used in an old person it can't be reused. This is why you see piles of old matter everywhere that can't be reused.
 
2013-01-16 08:13:51 PM  

Girion47: Would you use a teleporter if it meant the end of your consciousness but a continuation of an identical one wherever you teleported to?



Since this means you die every time you teleport, then no. I don't care if my future copy is precisely just like I used to be; that doesn't do me any good if I'm dead.
 
2013-01-16 08:22:51 PM  

Girion47: Would you use a teleporter if it meant the end of your consciousness but a continuation of an identical one wherever you teleported to?


media.comicvine.com

In the Invincible comics, the character Robot was a really smart kid who was born super jacked up. That's him on the right. So he cloned himself a good body and downloaded his memories into it. The first thing his new self had to do was kill his old self. Poignant moment in comic bookdom.
 
2013-01-16 08:27:42 PM  
Tell them it will get them laid.

- BRAIN NOW FULLY FUNCTIONAL AND IN OVERDRIVE
 
2013-01-16 08:31:44 PM  

www.smbc-comics.com
 
2013-01-16 09:19:48 PM  
Jobs that require lots of math.

Fighter pilots
Rocket scientists
Football quarterback

Jobs that require little to no math

Toilet cleaner
Low end prostitute
Republican Congressman on the science subcommittee
 
2013-01-16 09:42:18 PM  

GilRuiz1: Girion47: Would you use a teleporter if it meant the end of your consciousness but a continuation of an identical one wherever you teleported to?


Since this means you die every time you teleport, then no. I don't care if my future copy is precisely just like I used to be; that doesn't do me any good if I'm dead.


Who is "you"?
 
2013-01-16 09:42:30 PM  

serial_crusher: SmackLT: fusillade762: You don't need math for that. You just need to reconfooble the energymotron in order to boost power to the pattern buffer and make sure the Heisenberg compensators are set to prevent interference from particle fluctuations.

I can tell you possess a keen scientifical mind. Of course, your weakness is assuming that the Heisenberg compensators could prevent interference, when researchstatisticians have made it clear that particle fluctuations are not an issue when Van Allen waves cross the tertiary threshold of subsonic orchestration.

/duh

The Heisenberg compensators don't prevent interference.  They're quite susceptible to it, in fact, which is why each transporter has three of them.
Subby, try reversing the polarity of the tachyon beam and see if that fixes yer problem.


Idiots. All of you. You clearly know nothing about quantum teleportion.

To achieve quantum teleportion, you first need to recombobulate a Serpinksi measurement of the two particles in some Q-entangled basis on the Poo-dimensional subsystem. This measurement has Poo2 equally probable outcomes, which of course can then be cross-sectionalized using a time-modified flux capacitor. Quantum teleportion can then be achieved by sending the Q-entangled state through the appropriate unitary Poo-gate.

/sheesh
 
2013-01-16 09:58:35 PM  
Two fairly smart friends of mine have both made facebook posts in the last couple of days. One of them posted a picture of a whiteboard with a couple of fairly simple expressions, like:
(5x7y4)3
and a comment about it being awful, prompting a thread of other people chiming in with "might as well be chinese", "I'm terrified of going back to school because of this", and so on.
The other - in his early 30s - posted about being in a pre-algebra class at his community college. Yeah, pre-algebra, not pre-calculus. I had to look up what that actually entailed, and it looks like it's things like fractions, integer roots/exponents, factorization of numbers... 5th to 8th grade math.

It just blows my mind that these simple operations are impossible for a huge number of otherwise-bright 30-somethings. Math education in this country is just a total shambles.
 
2013-01-16 09:59:29 PM  
Next time some teenager asks why learning math is so important, hit 'em with: "to improve the efficiency of teleportation"

I'm gonna stick with "There's an abacus in my pants", thank you.
 
2013-01-16 10:08:53 PM  

Girion47: Would you use a teleporter if it meant the end of your consciousness but a continuation of an identical one wherever you teleported to?


I actually think about this a lot. I really don't know. I certainly wouldn't want to be the first.
 
2013-01-16 10:34:53 PM  
I'd rather them invent a modular gate.

I don't know if I trust them taking apart and putting back together my body again.
 
2013-01-16 10:50:49 PM  

Funbags: As much of a Star Trek nerd I was as a lad, it bothered me that they used transporters simply as means to teleport around, and not its more obvious value as a means of immortality.

/And no, I didn't have many friends as a lad.


They can't use it as a means of immortality, because one, there's nowhere to store the 'pattern'. The buffers are, in cannon, only short term storage, for the duration of the transport. They can sometimes hold it for longer, but this leads to all sorts of problems for them. Second, if you did store that pattern, it wouldn't gain any new experience, so sure, you might be able to make another copy of yourself, but it'd be like reloading your computer's hard drive from an old backup.

Scotty did once store himself in a pattern buffer by looping it back around with an amp or something, but when he was brought back out, it was decades later, and he was totally out of place, having had no experiences since then. He'd have been better off in a stasis chamber.
 
2013-01-16 11:00:22 PM  

Ob:

imgs.xkcd.com
 
2013-01-16 11:27:19 PM  

DemonEater: Two fairly smart friends of mine have both made facebook posts in the last couple of days. One of them posted a picture of a whiteboard with a couple of fairly simple expressions, like:
(5x7y4)3
and a comment about it being awful, prompting a thread of other people chiming in with "might as well be chinese", "I'm terrified of going back to school because of this", and so on.
The other - in his early 30s - posted about being in a pre-algebra class at his community college. Yeah, pre-algebra, not pre-calculus. I had to look up what that actually entailed, and it looks like it's things like fractions, integer roots/exponents, factorization of numbers... 5th to 8th grade math.

It just blows my mind that these simple operations are impossible for a huge number of otherwise-bright 30-somethings. Math education in this country is just a total shambles.


It's taught like shiat.

I didn't learn anything about math until Physics. Then, suddenly, it made sense. Calc II was the easiest math course I ever took. It was also the last one, but that's what happens when you teach math on its own with no practical context.
 
2013-01-16 11:37:17 PM  
Teleportation is not an exact science.
 
2013-01-17 12:47:26 AM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Funbags: No no, in the future we'll live as long as now but have magical levels of technology. We'll explore a universe 14 billion light years across with a life-form that has at best two good decades between booting up and the decay of middle-age. Atoms, you see, have an age, and once a carbon atom has been used in an old person it can't be reused. This is why you see piles of old matter everywhere that can't be reused.


fark old age. it sucks beyond the telling, everything hurts.
 
2013-01-17 01:07:08 AM  

doglover: I didn't learn anything about math until Physics. Then, suddenly, it made sense. Calc II was the easiest math course I ever took. It was also the last one, but that's what happens when you teach math on its own with no practical context.


So much THIS

/luckily I took physics in high school
//Now I'm into audio production which has a sh*t ton of math involved
 
2013-01-17 02:17:48 AM  

DemonEater:
It just blows my mind that these simple operations are impossible for a huge number of otherwise-bright 30-somethings. Math education in this country is just a total shambles.


Most of that starts with exactly the attitude you describe. "I just can't do math!" Every time I hear that, I want to punch someone in the face.

But you're not alone. Math education is a total shambles but it's pedagogical in nature, and therefore fixable.

A Mathematician's Lament (Warning: PDF)
 
2013-01-17 03:43:32 AM  

Rent Party: A Mathematician's Lament (Warning: PDF)


That was an awesome read! Thanks!
/and quite depressing at the same time
 
2013-01-17 04:33:28 AM  

limeyfellow: Jobs that require lots of math.

Fighter pilots
Rocket scientists
Football quarterback

Jobs that require little to no math

Toilet cleaner
Low end prostitute
Republican Congressman on the science subcommittee


assets.amuniversal.com
 
2013-01-17 08:38:49 AM  

Funbags: As much of a Star Trek nerd I was as a lad, it bothered me that they used transporters simply as means to teleport around, and not its more obvious value as a means of immortality.

/And no, I didn't have many friends as a lad.


Well, it's been done before but you don't want to run the risk of ending up like Franklin
 
2013-01-17 10:05:03 AM  

Rent Party: DemonEater:
It just blows my mind that these simple operations are impossible for a huge number of otherwise-bright 30-somethings. Math education in this country is just a total shambles.

Most of that starts with exactly the attitude you describe. "I just can't do math!" Every time I hear that, I want to punch someone in the face.

But you're not alone. Math education is a total shambles but it's pedagogical in nature, and therefore fixable.

A Mathematician's Lament (Warning: PDF)


That was an awesome read. I loved the definition of Pre-Calculus. That class was absolutely worthless when I took it in high school, I can honestly say that it had no flow, and I've never used anything from it.

PRE-CALCULUS. A senseless bouillabaisse of disconnected topics. Mostly a half-baked
attempt to introduce late nineteenth-century analytic methods into settings where they are neither
necessary nor helpful. Technical definitions of 'limits' and 'continuity' are presented in order to
obscure the intuitively clear notion of smooth change. As the name suggests, this course
prepares the student for Calculus, where the final phase in the systematic obfuscation of any
natural ideas related to shape and motion will be completed
 
2013-01-17 11:01:41 AM  
Ah, but do these scientists understand the importance of binaric cant in preparing the anointed for warp-exposure during the teleport?
 
2013-01-17 01:06:11 PM  

Nurglitch: Ah, but do these scientists understand the importance of binaric cant in preparing the anointed for warp-exposure during the teleport?


As long as they keep the neutrino field shear below acceptable levels and don't experience phase cancellation of the binary wave-function algorithm, they should be fine.
 
2013-01-17 04:16:49 PM  

rosonowski: Funbags: As much of a Star Trek nerd I was as a lad, it bothered me that they used transporters simply as means to teleport around, and not its more obvious value as a means of immortality.

/And no, I didn't have many friends as a lad.

They can't use it as a means of immortality, because one, there's nowhere to store the 'pattern'. The buffers are, in cannon, only short term storage, for the duration of the transport. They can sometimes hold it for longer, but this leads to all sorts of problems for them.


Except there was an episode of TNG where something was causing the crew to age abnormally fast (time pockets I think.) They were able to reset everyone by re-loading their patterns from the last time they transported before the incident. So apparently the patterns are stored...


Second, if you did store that pattern, it wouldn't gain any new experience, so sure, you might be able to make another copy of yourself, but it'd be like reloading your computer's hard drive from an old backup.


That makes sense, BUT in the same episode their memories were intact. I suspect, in as much as transporting is possible, this would be the real result though. That said, I'll take it! Hell, I can keep a diary or something and make sure my new copy gets it and can make better decisions based on my experience. I'll have to hire a ghost writer though, since I kind of suck at writing... hmm. Maybe a Cliff's Notes: Telos Edition, just hit the highlights. You know, which stocks I own, which states to avoid lest we have to pay child support, that sort of thing. ;)


Scotty did once store himself in a pattern buffer by looping it back around with an amp or something, but when he was brought back out, it was decades later, and he was totally out of place, having had no experiences since then. He'd have been better off in a stasis chamber.


I think I remember that episode. But the "out of placeness" wasn't just lack of experience, it was that technology had moved on by a few generations. I mean, he could probably have gotten a job in some museum of technology or something!
 
2013-01-17 07:02:00 PM  

Telos: Except there was an episode of TNG where something was causing the crew to age abnormally fast (time pockets I think.) They were able to reset everyone by re-loading their patterns from the last time they transported before the incident. So apparently the patterns are stored...


Didn't they have some technobabble to explain why they situation was unique?  Whatever the thing was that caused that problem had a side effect that they took advantage of, and even then it was risky, not the sort of thing you'd do every day?  I watched that a few months ago, wish I remembered the details.
 
2013-01-18 02:18:05 PM  

serial_crusher: Telos: Except there was an episode of TNG where something was causing the crew to age abnormally fast (time pockets I think.) They were able to reset everyone by re-loading their patterns from the last time they transported before the incident. So apparently the patterns are stored...

Didn't they have some technobabble to explain why they situation was unique?  Whatever the thing was that caused that problem had a side effect that they took advantage of, and even then it was risky, not the sort of thing you'd do every day?  I watched that a few months ago, wish I remembered the details.


Maybe, not sure. I do know that episode is what made me think of using the transporter for immortality. Given that, I don't think they explained anything that made it a one-shot deal.
 
2013-01-18 04:55:00 PM  

Telos: serial_crusher: Telos: Except there was an episode of TNG where something was causing the crew to age abnormally fast (time pockets I think.) They were able to reset everyone by re-loading their patterns from the last time they transported before the incident. So apparently the patterns are stored...

Didn't they have some technobabble to explain why they situation was unique?  Whatever the thing was that caused that problem had a side effect that they took advantage of, and even then it was risky, not the sort of thing you'd do every day?  I watched that a few months ago, wish I remembered the details.

Maybe, not sure. I do know that episode is what made me think of using the transporter for immortality. Given that, I don't think they explained anything that made it a one-shot deal.


There was also the DS9 episode where the transporter crapped out and they had to dump the entire station's memory to store 4 or 5 peoples' patterns.  So, it could also just be economically unfeasible to build that much storage for every person in Starfleet.  I bet rich people have their own clonopoters at home.

/ I wonder if Picard's artificial heart got younger and child-sized when he de-aged?
 
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