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(Yahoo)   Reasons why even free tickets aren't putting butts in seats for NBA games. "Your home team is the Wizards" suspiciously absent from list   (sports.yahoo.com) divider line 128
    More: Interesting, superstar, NBA, home team, Smith College, nba teams, fan loyalty, winter sport, D.J. Augustin  
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1799 clicks; posted to Sports » on 16 Jan 2013 at 3:17 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-16 01:47:57 PM
The interesting thing that he gets back to, that so many articles about sports attendance get back to, is that "It is better to watch on TV than in person".   And sports teams are having a hard time beating that.   Unlike movies, where, if it is a movie that is worth seeing on a VERY large screen, yes, people might have 50, 60, even 70s inch screens at home, but, that still isn't a 30 ft wide movie screen to watch a big action adventure movie..   Most sports seats are not close enough, so that, it is better to "watch" at home in most cases.

I think teams are going to have to get used to the fact that, other than people who are willing to pay for seats within lets say 50-100 feet of the playing area, those other seats are going to be mostly 1/2 empty, or you are practically giving them away.  That has to become "expected", not "shocking", because, the people who sat in those seats, 30, 20, even 10 years ago, now have the 50+ inch TVs and are fine with watching at home, and not spending the money, time, and hassle to get themselves and maybe their families to a game.
 
2013-01-16 02:04:27 PM
I know, I know the answer! Because giving things away for free undermines the whole pricing structure.... people will wait for massive discounts to attend, and won't care if they miss a game because they haven't invested any money in it.

The answer is to discount tickets across the board for the whole season, but cut back dramatically (or even eliminate) special promotional discounts. Have promotional events or giveaways instead.
 
2013-01-16 02:12:58 PM
The Wizards are a punchline around here.  You know who puts butts in seats? The Capitals and the Nationals.

Yes, it's true: Hockey and baseball are the last two great spectator experiences in America. I could be convinced to throw in soccer, but I haven't been to a game in ages.

/Medieval Times does not count
 
2013-01-16 02:15:08 PM
Could it be the focus on Super stars (of which there are only 5-7 in the league) instead of teams has means the average know-nothing fan does not give a crap unless Lebron, Kobe or Lob City are in town?
 
2013-01-16 02:49:38 PM

NuttierThanEver: Could it be the focus on Super stars (of which there are only 5-7 in the league) instead of teams has means the average know-nothing fan does not give a crap unless Lebron, Kobe or Lob City are in town?


This.

It's time for the NBA to contract to 8 or 12 teams.
 
2013-01-16 02:59:07 PM

NuttierThanEver: Could it be the focus on Super stars (of which there are only 5-7 in the league) instead of teams has means the average know-nothing fan does not give a crap unless Lebron, Kobe or Lob City are in town?


This.

The NBA relies on star power more than any of the other "big sports" in America - and it's more than just name recognition. To win in the NBA, it is absolutely mandatory to have a superstar player. There has not been an NBA Championship team in the past several years that did not have either a superstar player or a core group of star players (i.e. any group dubbed "the big three") backing it. Compare this to MLB in which the most recent World Series champions, the San Francisco Giants, are a team with a payroll $65 million less than that of the Yankees. Also compare to the NHL, in which the most recent Stanley Cup winners, the Los Angeles Kings, entered the playoffs as the 8-seed.

Tony Kornheiser and Michael Wilbon have both concurred on-air on Pardon the Interruption that the NBA is the most easily predictable of all the major sports leagues in the United States. They agreed that it is not difficult for a reasonable and knowledgeable basketball fan to take some time before the season begins to analyze the conferences and then pick which teams will make the playoffs with a high degree of accuracy. Rarely is there ever any kind of surprise playoff team or major playoff upset in the NBA. Once again, compare this to:

- the NHL, in which the current champions were the 8th seed in their conference
- MLB, in which the Orioles made the playoffs for the first time in 15 years, the Nationals had the best record in the league, the Athletics won their division on the final day of the season, the Red Sox tanked the season, and the two teams in the World Series had payrolls of $65 million and $59 million less than that of the Yankees
- the NFL, in which the Redskins, Seahawks, Colts, and Vikings stunned everyone by making the playoffs, and in which the team favored to win the super bowl on 3 to 1 odds was defeated at home in two overtimes by a team they were favored over by 9 points

Note that all of the above points are drastically more compelling than:

- LeBron wins, lol

tl;dr - Low ticket sales are not surprising at all because of the consistently and perpetually poor product many teams put on their home courts, and the end result of each season is rarely surprising.

/rant
 
2013-01-16 03:04:40 PM

PowerSlacker: NuttierThanEver: Could it be the focus on Super stars (of which there are only 5-7 in the league) instead of teams has means the average know-nothing fan does not give a crap unless Lebron, Kobe or Lob City are in town?

This.

It's time for the NBA to contract to 8 or 12 teams.


To an extent, you could say they "have".... there are 8-12 "premier" teams.  I would say there are more than 5-7 "mega stars", but, it is still low... only 20-30 at most.  The whole ruckus about the Spurs/Heat game is because the Spurs are one of those teams, and by leaving all their "name" players at home, they became the Raptors, from a fan standpoint.

And we are seeing these "3-4 big stars" teams come together... and those are the prime of the 8-12 "star teams".

The other teams are essentially playing in the "NBA B-League"... and 4-5 of them are lucky enough to be included in the NBA playoffs each year, usually to be thrashed in the first round.
 
2013-01-16 03:10:20 PM

FishyFred: Yes, it's true: Hockey and baseball are the last two great spectator experiences in America. I could be convinced to throw in soccer, but I haven't been to a game in ages.


Baseball?  Really?  Really?
 
2013-01-16 03:17:52 PM

ShawnDoc: FishyFred: Yes, it's true: Hockey and baseball are the last two great spectator experiences in America. I could be convinced to throw in soccer, but I haven't been to a game in ages.

Baseball?  Really?  Really?


What? You don't want to pay $75 to sit in the blazing hot sun for three hours and watch sausages race around the bases on the scoreboard between innings?
 
2013-01-16 03:18:26 PM
"ev-ry-bo-dy clap your hands" dun-dun-dun-dun-dun-dun-dun-dun-dun-dun-dun-dun-dun-dun-dun
 
2013-01-16 03:23:26 PM

ShawnDoc: FishyFred: Yes, it's true: Hockey and baseball are the last two great spectator experiences in America. I could be convinced to throw in soccer, but I haven't been to a game in ages.

Baseball?  Really?  Really?


Granted, you have to like baseball in the first place, but going to a baseball game is wonderful.

Hint: It's not just about the game.
 
2013-01-16 03:26:20 PM
Reason #Potato: You're don't live in one of the cities with a manufactured All-Star roster.
 
2013-01-16 03:27:18 PM

FishyFred: Granted, you have to like baseball in the first place, but going to a baseball game is wonderful.

Hint: It's not just about the game.


I can get just as drunk at Buffalo Wild Wings, and without getting a sun burn or paying $10 for a hotdog.  At at least at Buffalo Wild Wings there's commentary and other stuff to break up the monotony that is pro-baseball.
 
2013-01-16 03:28:36 PM
I will gladly pay a dollar to watch the Wizards lose.
 
2013-01-16 03:29:36 PM

dletter: The interesting thing that he gets back to, that so many articles about sports attendance get back to, is that "It is better to watch on TV than in person".


Not only have TVs and home entertainment systems in general gotten to the point that it's usually a much better experience to simply plop your ass on the living room to watch a game, but I'm not sure anyone under 40 is actually comfortable doing nothing but sitting and watching ONE thing for, say three hours. We stay home to watch a game on our flat screen TVs, and even during actual gameplay instead of just commercial breaks, we're dicking around with our phones, iPads, and god knows what else while generally only keeping one eye on the game itself.

The entire spectator experience of watching live sports needs to change.
 
2013-01-16 03:29:47 PM
Concessions are too damn high!
 
2013-01-16 03:30:45 PM

GiantRex: NuttierThanEver: Could it be the focus on Super stars (of which there are only 5-7 in the league) instead of teams has means the average know-nothing fan does not give a crap unless Lebron, Kobe or Lob City are in town?

This.

The NBA relies on star power more than any of the other "big sports" in America - and it's more than just name recognition. To win in the NBA, it is absolutely mandatory to have a superstar player. There has not been an NBA Championship team in the past several years that did not have either a superstar player or a core group of star players (i.e. any group dubbed "the big three") backing it. Compare this to MLB in which the most recent World Series champions, the San Francisco Giants, are a team with a payroll $65 million less than that of the Yankees. Also compare to the NHL, in which the most recent Stanley Cup winners, the Los Angeles Kings, entered the playoffs as the 8-seed.

Tony Kornheiser and Michael Wilbon have both concurred on-air on Pardon the Interruption that the NBA is the most easily predictable of all the major sports leagues in the United States. They agreed that it is not difficult for a reasonable and knowledgeable basketball fan to take some time before the season begins to analyze the conferences and then pick which teams will make the playoffs with a high degree of accuracy. Rarely is there ever any kind of surprise playoff team or major playoff upset in the NBA. Once again, compare this to:

- the NHL, in which the current champions were the 8th seed in their conference
- MLB, in which the Orioles made the playoffs for the first time in 15 years, the Nationals had the best record in the league, the Athletics won their division on the final day of the season, the Red Sox tanked the season, and the two teams in the World Series had payrolls of $65 million and $59 million less than that of the Yankees
- the NFL, in which the Redskins, Seahawks, Colts, and Vikings stunned everyone by making the playoffs, and in which the ...


Most recent Star-less NBA team to win? The 2004 Detroit Pistons came the closest. ABC about lost their shiat when game 4 of the sweep came around and they had to change all their promos from fellating team Kobe.
 
2013-01-16 03:32:20 PM

FishyFred: ShawnDoc: FishyFred: Yes, it's true: Hockey and baseball are the last two great spectator experiences in America. I could be convinced to throw in soccer, but I haven't been to a game in ages.

Baseball?  Really?  Really?

Granted, you have to like baseball in the first place, but going to a baseball game is wonderful.

Hint: It's not just about the game.


Baseball is fun. When Great American Ballpark was brand new, I was paying $6 to sit in the outfield within earshot of Austin Kearns. Get a few of the guys together, drink beer, watch the game, and enjoy the spectacle that isn't shown on TV. I haven't been in 10 years or so, but my friend is trying to con me into going this year and spend the game by a window in the Machine Room.
 
2013-01-16 03:32:25 PM
Basically the hassle that is to get into the arena waiting in line, being of 'american' proportions 6'1" 250 i find arena and stadium seating to be particularly cramped and uncomfortable and god forbid if i am wedged between two other americans, that can make for an unpleasant experience. 10 bucks for parking (if you are lucky)? 6 dollar beers? hotdog for 5 bucks?

Then I have to watch the nuggets play somebody, I cheer for the Jazz and follow the Hawks (so always plenty of cheap available tickets) but the experience is like getting in line to be probbed and pay premium for the experience doesnt exactly thrill me.

/yes i sound fat but at least im watching the game from home
//still the pepsi center is pretty nice
 
2013-01-16 03:35:48 PM

Contrabulous Flabtraption: "ev-ry-bo-dy clap your hands" dun-dun-dun-dun-dun-dun-dun-dun-dun-dun-dun-dun-dun-dun-dun


NBA games are a fun place to go if you want to watch a grown man stroll down the court while 9 grown men watch. Me may then pass the ball to another grown man who will bounce i around while 9 men watch.

College hoops is where it's at.
 
2013-01-16 03:37:29 PM

dletter: "It is better to watch on TV than in person".


I honestly don't know the answer to this question, but how have regular-season TV ratings been doing the past 10 years or so? If more and more people are staying home and watching it on their big-screen TV's, ratings must be up?
 
2013-01-16 03:41:37 PM

Slow To Return: I honestly don't know the answer to this question, but how have regular-season TV ratings been doing the past 10 years or so? If more and more people are staying home and watching it on their big-screen TV's, ratings must be up?


I should probably clarify this question. For nationally televised games, like Christmas Day, that features matchups of the marquee teams, ratings are undoubtably up, and the games are probably sold out as well. I'm not really talking about those types of games, though. I'm thinking of year-to-year cumulative ratings.
 
2013-01-16 03:42:05 PM

ShawnDoc: sun burn


Unless you're posting from early 1980s Wrigleyville, the majority of games are played at night.
 
2013-01-16 03:43:47 PM

2CountyFairs: FishyFred: ShawnDoc: FishyFred: Yes, it's true: Hockey and baseball are the last two great spectator experiences in America. I could be convinced to throw in soccer, but I haven't been to a game in ages.

Baseball?  Really?  Really?

Granted, you have to like baseball in the first place, but going to a baseball game is wonderful.

Hint: It's not just about the game.

Baseball is fun. When Great American Ballpark was brand new, I was paying $6 to sit in the outfield within earshot of Austin Kearns. Get a few of the guys together, drink beer, watch the game, and enjoy the spectacle that isn't shown on TV. I haven't been in 10 years or so, but my friend is trying to con me into going this year and spend the game by a window in the Machine Room.


Great park. I love going. Now that I live within walking distance, I'm gonna go to even more games.

/goreds
 
2013-01-16 03:44:22 PM
And the correct answer is.

Fans are tired of seeing their team lose the star players to one of the big 4-5 franchises that own 90% of the NBA titles in all of history.

Parity is a great thing to get butts in the seats. Just look at the NFL. If you want to play the road where only a handful of franchises are ever really in contention and soak up all the talent. Then you better be prepared for those teams to subsidize their opponents because the fans will only do it for so long.

People complain about hockey going back to the original 6 ... the reality is the NBA SHOULD do it, because there only exists enough talent in the league to support 6 teams anyways.
 
2013-01-16 03:46:09 PM

tricycleracer: ShawnDoc: sun burn

Unless you're posting from early 1980s Wrigleyville, the majority of games are played at night.


There are tons of games during the day. non nationally televised weekend games usually start at 1:10 or 4:30. and where I live it is still sunny when I get to the park for a 7:10 start.
 
2013-01-16 03:46:12 PM

2CountyFairs: Baseball is fun. When Great American Ballpark was brand new, I was paying $6 to sit in the outfield within earshot of Austin Kearns. Get a few of the guys together, drink beer, watch the game, and enjoy the spectacle that isn't shown on TV. I haven't been in 10 years or so, but my friend is trying to con me into going this year and spend the game by a window in the Machine Room.


What isn't shown on TV?  A drunk fat guy spilling some beer on a lady and getting in a fight with her boyfriend?  A guy in the mascot costume running around the bases?
 
2013-01-16 03:47:48 PM
The best baseball experiences are at the better run minor league teams. Although we go to one NY game a year, and one Red Sox game.
 
2013-01-16 03:49:15 PM
www.onlineworldofwrestling.com
"Yeah, that'll put butts in the seats."
 
2013-01-16 03:50:42 PM
How about: the Seattle team plays in the far-off galaxy of Oklahoma City.
 
2013-01-16 03:52:21 PM

ShawnDoc: 2CountyFairs: Baseball is fun. When Great American Ballpark was brand new, I was paying $6 to sit in the outfield within earshot of Austin Kearns. Get a few of the guys together, drink beer, watch the game, and enjoy the spectacle that isn't shown on TV. I haven't been in 10 years or so, but my friend is trying to con me into going this year and spend the game by a window in the Machine Room.

What isn't shown on TV?  A drunk fat guy spilling some beer on a lady and getting in a fight with her boyfriend?  A guy in the mascot costume running around the bases?


usually? what isn't shown is things that happen away from the ball. oh, and the community spirit. and the cool charity/group events they'll do.
 
2013-01-16 03:52:56 PM
I think basketball would be much more interesting if the league were to raise the height of the baskets by 18"-24".  It would get rid of the showboating slam dunkers that distract from the sport.
 
2013-01-16 03:55:47 PM

GiantRex: - the NHL, in which the current champions were the 8th seed in their conference
- MLB, in which the Orioles made the playoffs for the first time in 15 years, the Nationals had the best record in the league, the Athletics won their division on the final day of the season, the Red Sox tanked the season, and the two teams in the World Series had payrolls of $65 million and $59 million less than that of the Yankees
- the NFL, in which the Redskins, Seahawks, Colts, and Vikings stunned everyone by making the playoffs, and in which the team favored to win the super bowl on 3 to 1 odds was defeated at home in two overtimes by a team they were favored over by 9 points

Note that all of the above points are drastically more compelling than:

- LeBron wins, lol


If your enjoyment of a sport hinges on whether or not the outcomes are exciting (rather than the level of play on the field and the aesthetic pleasure that comes with grown men kicking/passing/throwing a ball around the field), then you're watching sports for the wrong reasons.  You watch NBA basketball because it is the most inclusive major sports league on the planet, an internationally-popular sports league with a low rate of roster turnover, a sports league which rewards its athletes extremely well (and thus attracts the best athletes), a league reserved for the 450 or so best players in the world.  You watch NBA basketball because there is no other sports league on the planet which so instantly calls to mind the term "genetic superfreak".  On the hand, I do not watch the college basketball tournament because, when compared to professional hoops on either side of the ocean, the level of play absolutely sucks.  The idea that "sixty-four different teams have a chance to win the championship" does not even come close to providing interest in the tournament, because that champion would get wrecked by a disinterested Wizards team.

I'll say it over and over: Nobody cared about any of this until football's manufactured, mediocre parity became a blueprint for popularity in American professional sports.  And certainly, "it's popular" doesn't mean it makes a better product.  The period after the ABA merger had the most competitive top-to-bottom basketball in the league's modern history and nobody cared because the league was "too black" and the on-court violence was completely getting out of control.  And then the Lakers and Celtics and Bulls dominated the next two decades and the league flourished in popularity.  What do you want them to do?  As a game, professional basketball relies on an extremely high sample size per game, usually in the range of about 90 to 100 scoring opportunities per team per game.  As a game, basketball relies on a low roster size that allows individuals to have a gigantic impact on the course of a game.  As a business, basketball relies on a long season schedule that usually makes it clear which teams are the best and which ones are the worst.  You can't fundamentally change that.

Even then, I would still say the season could and can be shorter, even if it wouldn't happen.  I'd love to see 62 games and do a 5-5-7-7 format.  However, as the league is currently constructed, when a lower seed beats a heavily-favored team, it actually means something.  When the Grizzlies beat the Spurs in the first round, it meant something.  When the Warriors beat the Mavericks in the first round, it meant something.  And you can say "Well, the Grizzlies and the Warriors didn't have a chance to win anyway", but you can bet your ass the the Mavs and the Spurs did, and they derailed the entire NBA playoffs, for all I'm concerned.  In the NFL, upsets mean absolutely nothing.  It is boring now.  They only mean something if you 1) bet lots of money on the games, and 2) are one of the people who believe the "experts" (lol) when they say that "no one could have ever seen this coming", despite the fact it happens just about every week at this point.

People can continue to bemoan the NBA because "my team doesn't have a shot" or "you know who is going to win", but I know that at the end of the day when the Finals come around, I'm probably going to be watching the two best basketball teams in the league, and I am perfectly okay with that.  I'm not going to say the NBA model is absolutely perfect, but I'll take something closer to the NBA model than the NFL model every single time.
 
2013-01-16 03:56:45 PM

Slow To Return: Slow To Return: I honestly don't know the answer to this question, but how have regular-season TV ratings been doing the past 10 years or so? If more and more people are staying home and watching it on their big-screen TV's, ratings must be up?

I should probably clarify this question. For nationally televised games, like Christmas Day, that features matchups of the marquee teams, ratings are undoubtably up, and the games are probably sold out as well. I'm not really talking about those types of games, though. I'm thinking of year-to-year cumulative ratings.


Why would ratings be up? The difference in 15-20k people showing for a game instead of 30k is negligible at best. Even if you accumulate all the games nationwide over the course of a year youre looking at a 1-2pt blip which is covered by standard deviation.

You also have to take into account more sports bars and homes with large tvs that would get counted as one but are serving multiple viewers.
 
2013-01-16 03:58:24 PM

poisonedpawn78: Parity is a great thing to get butts in the seats. Just look at the NFL. If you want to play the road where only a handful of franchises are ever really in contention and soak up all the talent. Then you better be prepared for those teams to subsidize their opponents because the fans will only do it for so long.


That works for the NFL, but in the NBA, the opposite has historically been true. The most memorable years featured several marquee teams and a bunch of bottom-feeders. In the early 2000s, the Eastern Conference got so muddled that it became virtually unwatchable. Ratings were WAY down.

DoctorOfLove: The best baseball experiences are at the better run minor league teams. Although we go to one NY game a year, and one Red Sox game.


Minor league baseball = the Great American Carnival. Major league teams feature some of that too, but minor league teams exemplify what I meant when I said it's about more than the game.

EnviroDude: I think basketball would be much more interesting if the league were to raise the height of the baskets by 18"-24".  It would get rid of the showboating slam dunkers that distract from the sport.


samdevdiary.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-01-16 03:59:20 PM
At least the Wizards are consistent.

So we've got that going for us.
 
2013-01-16 03:59:33 PM

tricycleracer: Unless you're posting from early 1980s Wrigleyville, the majority of games are played at night.


Angel Stadium.  Plenty of games while the sun is still out.
 
2013-01-16 04:00:29 PM

SuperT: tricycleracer: ShawnDoc: sun burn

Unless you're posting from early 1980s Wrigleyville, the majority of games are played at night.

There are tons of games during the day. non nationally televised weekend games usually start at 1:10 or 4:30. and where I live it is still sunny when I get to the park for a 7:10 start.


I just ran the Rays home schedule through Excel and 21 of 81 games are at 4:10 or earlier.  Not that it matters since it's a dome.  Maybe all the AL East match ups skew them into prime-time.
 
2013-01-16 04:02:49 PM
The product on the court is terrible. Who wants to watch 10 hotdogs play exhibition ball at premium prices? Sure, maybe once every couple of years as a novelty, but that's it. I can't even tell you the team colors for the pro team here yet I love NCAA ball. We need something like the ABA to come along again to shake things up, give a better game on the court, and make the pros relevant again.
 
2013-01-16 04:06:53 PM
The NBA in 10 years:

East

New York
Boston
Brooklyn
Chicago
Detroit
Miami

West

LA Lakers
Dallas
San Antonio
Houston
Portland
Seattle
 
2013-01-16 04:07:18 PM

GiantRex: ShawnDoc: FishyFred: Yes, it's true: Hockey and baseball are the last two great spectator experiences in America. I could be convinced to throw in soccer, but I haven't been to a game in ages.

Baseball?  Really?  Really?

What? You don't want to pay $75 to sit in the blazing hot sun for three hours and watch sausages race around the bases on the scoreboard between innings?


Personally, living in the Detroit area, I'm able to get $5 our $10 tickets a few tinges a year, park in a $5 lot a few blocks from the stadium, have a $5 hotdog, pop, chips meal, grab a couple $5 beers and have a great time for like $30 total.
 
2013-01-16 04:07:49 PM

tricycleracer: SuperT: tricycleracer: ShawnDoc: sun burn

Unless you're posting from early 1980s Wrigleyville, the majority of games are played at night.

There are tons of games during the day. non nationally televised weekend games usually start at 1:10 or 4:30. and where I live it is still sunny when I get to the park for a 7:10 start.

I just ran the Rays home schedule through Excel and 21 of 81 games are at 4:10 or earlier.  Not that it matters since it's a dome.  Maybe all the AL East match ups skew them into prime-time.


Oh yea, the games that take place during the week, are in prime-time, because, well, work. I'm just saying, there are lots of day games.
 
2013-01-16 04:13:56 PM

FishyFred:

That works for the NFL, but in the NBA, the opposite has historically been true. The most memorable years featured several marquee teams and a bunch of bottom-feeders. In the early 2000s, the Eastern Conference got so muddled that it became virtually unwatchable. Ratings were WAY down.


According to ESPN:
2001 league attendance 19,955,981
2012 league attendance 17,100,861
 
2013-01-16 04:14:59 PM
NHL games are much better in person. That being said, I have no problem staying home watching them in HD. Too expensive to go to games on a frequent basis, unless I want to sit up in the clouds. Up there, at least there are windows where one can look out into the Everglades.

\Fark Club Red.
\\More like Club  Dead, amirite??
 
2013-01-16 04:15:14 PM

meanmutton: GiantRex: ShawnDoc: FishyFred: Yes, it's true: Hockey and baseball are the last two great spectator experiences in America. I could be convinced to throw in soccer, but I haven't been to a game in ages.

Baseball?  Really?  Really?

What? You don't want to pay $75 to sit in the blazing hot sun for three hours and watch sausages race around the bases on the scoreboard between innings?

Personally, living in the Detroit area, I'm able to get $5 our $10 tickets a few tinges a year, park in a $5 lot a few blocks from the stadium, have a $5 hotdog, pop, chips meal, grab a couple $5 beers and have a great time for like $30 total.


Sure
But you have to live in Detroit.

So there's that.
 
2013-01-16 04:15:29 PM

Mike_LowELL: Even then, I would still say the season could and can be shorter, even if it wouldn't happen.  I'd love to see 62 games and do a 5-5-7-7 format.


I'd go 58, do a home-and-home against every other team in the league, get a regular-season trophy that sort of means something, then do the playoffs like that. Other than that, I concur.

Mike_LowELL: People can continue to bemoan the NBA because "my team doesn't have a shot" or "you know who is going to win", but I know that at the end of the day when the Finals come around,


I'd also mention that no one thought the Mavericks were going to win the title two years ago.
 
2013-01-16 04:16:00 PM
I went to a Cavaliers game a few years back. It was AWFUL. The arena was about 50% empty, and the crowd just seemed sleepy and more interested in getting nachos and dogs. Crowd actually booed the home team several times. Only got excited on Lebron dunks. It was honestly kind of depressing being there.

//not to mention the city of Cleveland is full of miserable people who go out of their way to make visitors miserable
/// UK alum/fan, so my expectations of home arena atmosphere may be unrealistic
 
2013-01-16 04:18:13 PM

IAmRight: I'd also mention that no one thought the Mavericks were going to win the title two years ago.


That was when Stern got drunk and gave the book to Vince Russo.
 
2013-01-16 04:19:50 PM

IAmRight:
I'd also mention that no one thought the Mavericks were going to win the title two years ago.



Speak for yourself. I predicted they would win and put money on the line saying so. It was a glorious year in basketball.

And im not even a mavericks fan lol.
 
2013-01-16 04:22:06 PM

grimlock1972: Concessions are too damn high!


You can swing $9 for a single crappy lukewarm light beer in a plastic bottle?
 
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