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(Artinfo)   American method of building demolition: massive explosions, giant cloud of dust. Japanese method of building demolition: just remove floors when nobody is looking   (blogs.artinfo.com) divider line 41
    More: Spiffy, Japanese, building demolition, explosions  
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6599 clicks; posted to Video » on 16 Jan 2013 at 11:19 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-16 10:49:10 AM
Pretty cool but how long does it take to do a floor?
 
2013-01-16 10:49:52 AM
I seem to remember reading something a while back that occasionally Hollywood will help pay part of the demo costs because they want to blowup the building in a spectacular way to later be used in a movie.  So, occasionally there is an explanation on why some buildings are brought down in a particular way.
 
2013-01-16 11:05:19 AM
Imagine working in a building nearby. If you didn't know it was going on, you'd wonder why the building didn't look right and would probably start thinking you were crazy.
 
2013-01-16 11:05:30 AM
Yeah, that looks totally affordable.

I can see using it in a crowded downtown area (we already do something similar) but if you're blowing up a building, it's because you have the room to do it and want to save time and money.
 
2013-01-16 11:12:23 AM
They should paint big teeth on the top hat so it looks like "om nom nom nom".
 
2013-01-16 11:12:37 AM
Blowing up a building is awesome but all it leaves is a twisted pile of steel and concrete. This way you can actually recycle the building materials. I bet it's about the same price and takes similar time if you factor in site prep and cleanup times and costs.
 
2013-01-16 11:23:34 AM
Well, considering they've had experience with American urban renewal, I can see why they might be a bit gun shy:

www.whatsontianjin.com
 
2013-01-16 11:24:41 AM
i figured they would start with the top floor and work down.  It seems like that would be easier than starting with the bottom floor or some random floor in the middle - what they actually did.
 
2013-01-16 11:54:32 AM

Lsherm: Yeah, that looks totally affordable.


Ding!

And very, very time efficient!
 
2013-01-16 11:54:57 AM
I agree, subby. The American way is still better. And more fun. And fun to watch.
 
2013-01-16 11:55:15 AM

Lsherm: Yeah, that looks totally affordable.


They're getting all their energy for free (or so they claim at least), which has to help. So that point it just becomes man hours to do this
Plus you can get a dozen construction workers to cut stuff up for the cost of one engineer to do a demo impact survey.
 
2013-01-16 11:56:27 AM

SlothB77: i figured they would start with the top floor and work down.  It seems like that would be easier than starting with the bottom floor or some random floor in the middle - what they actually did.


There's a comment in the story that they use the mass of the building to somehow cover the electricity costs. Presumably they install something like jacks to hold up the building and slowly lower the building, bleeding off the excess into a turbine or something. Honestly I'm pretty curious about how they do that. Any ideas?
 
2013-01-16 11:59:05 AM

SlothB77: i figured they would start with the top floor and work down.  It seems like that would be easier than starting with the bottom floor or some random floor in the middle - what they actually did.


You might want to RTFA.
 
2013-01-16 12:04:20 PM
GIve me the goddam explosion EVERY time. Plus, it gives me another excuse to drink.
 
2013-01-16 12:22:05 PM
I told you those people were sneaky
 
Xai
2013-01-16 12:28:00 PM
If you looked at the cost of a standard demolition this might seem downright cheap.
 
2013-01-16 12:35:03 PM

Xai: If you looked at the cost of a standard demolition this might seem downright cheap.


Would also be easier to recover and sell the valuable materials. I've read that some building are demolished for free because the innards are so valuable.
 
2013-01-16 12:55:41 PM

Lsherm: Yeah, that looks totally affordable.

I can see using it in a crowded downtown area (we already do something similar) but if you're blowing up a building, it's because you have the room to do it and want to save time and money.


Thread over. Came here to say this--it wouldn't make sense to blow up a building when another one is 20 feet away.

Way to compare apples to oranges, subby.
 
2013-01-16 12:58:21 PM
Instant Gratification!!!

www.veredirectory.com.au
 
2013-01-16 01:12:05 PM
But our method is so much more fun!
 
2013-01-16 01:14:50 PM
I'm disappointed that the Japanese method doesn't involve Godzilla.

/or at least Baragon or something.
 
2013-01-16 01:22:29 PM

KarmicDisaster: They should paint big teeth put a huge inflatable Godzilla foot on the top hat so it looks like "om nom nom nom".


Then the time lapse version would be...AWESOME!
instead of looking like someone is Photoshopping away the building one floor at a time.
 
2013-01-16 01:43:09 PM

Arkanaut: I'm disappointed that the Japanese method doesn't involve Godzilla.

/or at least Baragon or something.


Or Giant Fuji:

i3.photobucket.com

Sexy, sexy kaiju.
 
2013-01-16 01:52:11 PM
Or you could just fly airplanes into them and then blame people who hate freedom.

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-01-16 02:16:17 PM
I have been searching for a similar video for quite some time I remember watching once. Same method, but in reverse. Load bearing members were removed one by one and replaced by massive pneumatic/hydraulic rams. Once every member was replaced, the adjoining walls were removed, then the rams dropped the entire building a storey, the process repeated until the building was gone (time-lapse, natch). The demolished building was in a densley packed city so conventional demo methods just wouldn't have worked (even the one depicted in the video).

Haven't seen the video in a while though....
 
2013-01-16 02:21:38 PM
Found it

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jwf9LoS9Xt8
 
2013-01-16 03:40:41 PM
Pretty sneaky Japan...
 
2013-01-16 04:04:48 PM

Stantz: Found it

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jwf9LoS9Xt8


That was the first thing I thought of as well. I figured that's what the article was going to be about. The article's method seems a little odd.. why go to all the effort of building a factory on top of a building to take it apart, when you could just do this? Of course, as someone else mentioned, if there's just no room to take it apart at the ground floor, I suppose the roof factory idea would be the next best thing.
 
2013-01-16 04:09:12 PM

TNel: Pretty cool but how long does it take to do a floor?


I'll have to ask your mom
 
2013-01-16 04:22:16 PM

Arkanaut: I'm disappointed that the Japanese method doesn't involve Godzilla.

/or at least Baragon or something.


Perhaps they figured out a way to harness the power of Godzilla and hes hidden under that cap.
 
2013-01-16 04:24:06 PM
It would have been nice to see a video from the inside to see what's going on.

/Too lazy to look
 
2013-01-16 04:48:21 PM

Tr0mBoNe: Blowing up a building is awesome but all it leaves is a twisted pile of steel and concrete. This way you can actually recycle the building materials. I bet it's about the same price and takes similar time if you factor in site prep and cleanup times and costs.


The man hours involved in disassembly would be significantly higher than the combination of demolition and cleanup. This method is only feasible when absolutely necessary and no other method (demolition) are allowable.
 
2013-01-16 07:02:18 PM

Munchausen's Proxy: Tr0mBoNe: Blowing up a building is awesome but all it leaves is a twisted pile of steel and concrete. This way you can actually recycle the building materials. I bet it's about the same price and takes similar time if you factor in site prep and cleanup times and costs.

The man hours involved in disassembly would be significantly higher than the combination of demolition and cleanup. This method is only feasible when absolutely necessary and no other method (demolition) are allowable.


This way's easier for moving buildings around to freak out bosses on long vacations though.
 
2013-01-16 07:49:56 PM
Chinese method of building demolition:

weburbanist.com
 
2013-01-16 08:41:00 PM

Munchausen's Proxy: Tr0mBoNe: Blowing up a building is awesome but all it leaves is a twisted pile of steel and concrete. This way you can actually recycle the building materials. I bet it's about the same price and takes similar time if you factor in site prep and cleanup times and costs.

The man hours involved in disassembly would be significantly higher than the combination of demolition and cleanup. This method is only feasible when absolutely necessary and no other method (demolition) are allowable.


I am going to assume the majority of the costs are paid off by recycling the materials. Windows, steal supports, wiring, heck even carpeting and other materials are profitable to recycle in particular in bulk, add in that you eliminate permitting and a wide range of other expenses involved with using the explosives. They mostly are looking to do this on buildings 100m or higher that have increased complications. Plus most high rises are right next to other high rises and structural damage is a major concern, plus in heavily populated areas disrupting several blocks worth of traffic is expensive. The only real down side is the time it would take.

Nurglitch: SlothB77: i figured they would start with the top floor and work down.  It seems like that would be easier than starting with the bottom floor or some random floor in the middle - what they actually did.

There's a comment in the story that they use the mass of the building to somehow cover the electricity costs. Presumably they install something like jacks to hold up the building and slowly lower the building, bleeding off the excess into a turbine or something. Honestly I'm pretty curious about how they do that. Any ideas?



When they start at the top floor they use a crane to lower building materials down to ground level internally, the crane generates the energy. (so reverse of how we often think of a crane using energy (or a counterweight) to lift an object, instead if you drop an object you can generate energy (or pick something up).
 
2013-01-16 10:43:26 PM
Not a single "if anyone knows how to shrink an erection, it's the Japanese" joke? Really?
 
2013-01-16 11:00:33 PM

Lligeret: Windows, steal supports, wiring, heck even carpeting and other materials are profitable to recycle in particular in bulk,


Is this new?  I was a floor and carpet layer for about 10 years back in the 80's (got me through high school and college) and not only could we not recycle carpet, incinerators wouldn't take it and the dump would charge you extra.  It was toxic to burn or melt down and unless it was in great condition, there really isn't a market for used carpet.  Anywhere.
 
2013-01-17 06:51:10 AM
That building looked all modern, and shiat. Why are they deleting floors from it?

/I'm drunk
 
2013-01-17 08:37:22 AM

SlothB77: i figured they would start with the top floor and work down.  It seems like that would be easier than starting with the bottom floor or some random floor in the middle - what they actually did.


Nobody explained this one, but they do start at the top. What you're seeing is an illusion. The mushroomy top of that building is a hermetic wrap to prevent dust and debris. It's more clear in the other pictures at the bottom.
 
2013-01-17 06:44:28 PM
Union job
 
2013-01-18 03:30:23 AM
"We've got to make these things smaller!"
 
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