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(Yahoo)   They cited Admiralty Law? The Sovereign Citizens must be wetting themselves   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 16
    More: Florida, U.S. Supreme Court, maritime laws, U.S., Breyers, Sonia Sotomayor, marinas, Fane Lozman  
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15421 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Jan 2013 at 10:12 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-16 10:16:02 AM
5 votes:
Whatever floats your boat.
I'm hoping he sues them for a lot and wins.
They (the city) sound like a bunch of assholes.
2013-01-16 10:36:56 AM
4 votes:
Pamela Ryan, the city attorney for Riviera Beach, said in a statement she was disappointed with the ruling but accepts it, and that the city will revise its marina policies.

Somewhere, a tiny violin is playing for this poor, widdle government seat-warmer trying to bully a citizen.

They need a good slapping down one in a while to remind them they are supposed to be working for us.
2013-01-16 11:06:40 AM
3 votes:
From a better report (NPR yesterday), this was pretty much local government getting pissed off at the guy for torpedoing some luxury redevelopment project. The project proposal was struck down (I'm sure the local gov officials had no financial interest at all), then they suddenly declared he owed some fees. He said fark you, the city seized the house, bought it themselves, then immediately smashed it (with his stuff still inside). Certainly not retaliatory at all.

The worst part is, as usual, nothing will happen to the local officials that screwed this up and the tax payers will pay for everything.


Better NPR story
2013-01-16 11:01:48 AM
3 votes:

ha-ha-guy: /although I guess if they classified it as a vessel perhaps it was easier to seize than if it was considered a residence


That's exactly what they did.

I was listening to this story on NPR and this article left out a few details. First, the reason they wanted him to move his house to begin with was to clear the way for a luxury condominium development. It didn't way whether the city planners involved stood to make any money from the venture, of course.

Then, when all this was over, they offered him $300 in compensation--for the destruction of his house and all of his legal fees.

I'm hoping the guy sues the city board and somehow finds a way to make their members personally liable for the damages.
2013-01-16 11:45:54 AM
2 votes:
I'm solidly liberal and anti-wingnut, but if this decision separates "riverboat" casinos from maritime law, I'm perfectly fine with that.
2013-01-16 11:01:31 AM
2 votes:

ha-ha-guy: I'm confused though, it says it was seized over dockage fees. While it might not be a boat, if you are tied to the dock you have to pay. If he owed the fees, he owed the fees.

/although I guess if they classified it as a vessel perhaps it was easier to seize than if it was considered a residence


Under admiralty law you can get a lien against a vessel for unpaid dockage fees. If it's not paid in time the vessel can then be seized and auctioned off to satisfy the lien. This is what the city did here. They got the lien, seized and auctioned the "vessel," and then bought it at their own auction. Once they had bought it the city demolished it. Basically the city went to admiralty law to get rid of this guy once their earlier eviction efforts had failed.
2013-01-16 12:09:15 PM
1 votes:
They have some nice houseboats around here. Ive always wanted to get one. The one I liked the most here was 2 floors and on the roof had a hot tub.
2013-01-16 11:25:02 AM
1 votes:
The most important part of TFA???
"It is also a victory for the casino industry, which in court papers argued that more than 60 riverboat casinos should not be subject to U.S. maritime laws designed to protect seamen, on top of state laws to license and regulate the gaming business."
The truth, it does come out if you wait long enough.
...now, back to friggin' with the riggin'
2013-01-16 11:13:13 AM
1 votes:

Because People in power are Stupid: That "home" looks like a doublewide on pontoons. Please Florida, do everyone a favor and just sink that eyesore.


They did. Now that he won on the vessel issue he's planning to sue the city about that as well.
2013-01-16 10:56:54 AM
1 votes:
I can get a home loan for a house boat if I want. Seems like the intended use of a hosue boat is occupancy, not travel or transportation.
2013-01-16 10:52:17 AM
1 votes:

ZAZ: Did the city screw itself by proceeding under the wrong law? If the alleged vessel is merely a floating house the city should be able to place a lien for city services and proceed under state law rather than federal law.


I think you are right. There could be, and likely are, a number of state and local laws that this houseboat would or could be subject to. But for whatever reason, the city sued under an admiralty law which only applied to "vessels", and on this point they eventually lost.
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-01-16 10:32:31 AM
1 votes:
Did the city screw itself by proceeding under the wrong law? If the alleged vessel is merely a floating house the city should be able to place a lien for city services and proceed under state law rather than federal law.
2013-01-16 10:29:02 AM
1 votes:

I May Be Crazy But...: Maybe they should try a different tack.


your jib, it has a nice cut.
2013-01-16 10:27:53 AM
1 votes:

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: In a 7-2 decision, the court ruled that a gray, two-story home that its owner said was permanently moored to a Riviera Beach, Florida, marina was not a vessel, depriving the city of power under U.S. maritime law to seize and destroy it.

Since it was a U.S. maritime law the city was trying to enforce, I don't think this would be classified as a sovereignty issue.


well, the sovereign citizens don't know much about sovereignty or admiralty, but somehow they think that using both words in the right combination entitles them to a legal privilege that means no laws and no taxes.

I thought this was more an issue of the complexities that we had to solve back in the day when someone wondered whether a mobile home was a movable or an immovable (real property or personal property). here, though the stakes are very different, they seemed to go down a similar classification analysis of whether this was a vessel or not.

/ but, vessels are not the only things governed by admiralty law. maybe i'll read this opinion. there's probably a lot that the reporter didn't mention. because, it sounds like this house in the middle of a marina or something, and, that's really knocking on the door of watery commerce.
2013-01-16 10:24:32 AM
1 votes:
Maybe they should try a different tack.
2013-01-16 10:21:41 AM
1 votes:
In a 7-2 decision, the court ruled that a gray, two-story home that its owner said was permanently moored to a Riviera Beach, Florida, marina was not a vessel, depriving the city of power under U.S. maritime law to seize and destroy it.

Since it was a U.S. maritime law the city was trying to enforce, I don't think this would be classified as a sovereignty issue.
 
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