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(Russia Today)   Thousands apply for 200 jobs at Target in New Mexico. Store execs wonder how so many Walmart employees managed to all get off work at the same time   (rt.com) divider line 44
    More: Interesting, New Mexico, Target, same time, University of San Diego, Glassdoor  
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1172 clicks; posted to Business » on 16 Jan 2013 at 9:38 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-16 10:02:28 AM
Woah, slow down, meistro!  There's a NEW Mexico?
 
2013-01-16 10:14:30 AM
How many of them were legal?
 
2013-01-16 10:31:29 AM
Wasn't there some McDonald's job a while back that got like 18,000 applications?

What a sad depressing future we live in. I always wondered why those dystopian movies depicted societies with only two groups. One being extremely wealthy, the other in abject poverty. Now I know why (the writers were gawdammed geniuses).
 
2013-01-16 10:56:27 AM
+1 to submitter. I lol'd.

This just shows people are out there, trying like heck to get SOMETHING. Target wouldn't be a first choice for a lot of folks (understandably). Desperate times.
 
2013-01-16 11:08:55 AM
I guess I'm not that impressed by "thousands" - I mean I think it's a damn shame if every one of those people were unemployed (I assume a significant portion were). But at the same time it's not incredibly insane for a single regular position to get 20 or more applicants for any job. So when it hits the news that there will be 200 jobs available (thus greatly increasing the number of people aware of the openings) even 10 applicants per spot puts you in to the thousands.
 
2013-01-16 11:22:25 AM

nekom: Woah, slow down, meistro!  There's a NEW Mexico?


Yeah, and it's better you don't know about it
www.funnydictionary.com
/hot
 
2013-01-16 11:23:17 AM
Meh, we had 1 opening here that we interviewed 10 people for before we finally found somebody worth a damn.  No idea how many resumes we got but passed on.
 
2013-01-16 11:23:59 AM

Fizpez: I guess I'm not that impressed by "thousands" - I mean I think it's a damn shame if every one of those people were unemployed (I assume a significant portion were). But at the same time it's not incredibly insane for a single regular position to get 20 or more applicants for any job. So when it hits the news that there will be 200 jobs available (thus greatly increasing the number of people aware of the openings) even 10 applicants per spot puts you in to the thousands.


that's some great math skillz lou.
 
2013-01-16 11:28:51 AM

serial_crusher: Meh, we had 1 opening here that we interviewed 10 people for before we finally found somebody worth a damn.  No idea how many resumes we got but passed on.


When I hear that what it translates as is "we passed on a lot of candidates that would have probably done a great job, but we, like other companies, have decided that training an employee isn't something we want to do anymore"
 
2013-01-16 11:37:18 AM
Subby apparently has never worked for Wal-Mart or Target, otherwise he would know they treat employees the same. Target just has better PR... and Kool-Aid.
 
2013-01-16 11:41:05 AM
CSB: I applied for a low-level management job with Target when we first moved to NM on a whim. Got called in to interview. This was years ago, so my memory is fuzzy, but it was an insanely long process where they sent you to five or six different individuals to be asked the same questions over and over. I fared pretty well until it was all over and I was speaking with the HR lady. She was talking about sending me to one store clear across town for training. I asked which store on my side of town would I likely go to once triaining was completed. She said it could be any of the stores in Albuquerque. I told her that I "am not going to drive past a Target store on my way to my job at a Target store." She actually seemed shocked.

Dodged a bullet there. Got a job in construction instead and loved it.
 
2013-01-16 11:42:53 AM

Girion47: serial_crusher: Meh, we had 1 opening here that we interviewed 10 people for before we finally found somebody worth a damn.  No idea how many resumes we got but passed on.

When I hear that what it translates as is "we passed on a lot of candidates that would have probably done a great job, but we, like other companies, have decided that training an employee isn't something we want to do anymore"


bingo. The common excuses are, "but we are critical", "we have too much pressure from management", "a noob couldn't do what we do" etc... Unless it's a hotshot startup type company, mature business processes aren't that complicated. I guess people think, I will hire this guy because he gave a great interview, not realizing that many times, the guy is coached, not experienced.
 
2013-01-16 11:43:32 AM

Girion47: serial_crusher: Meh, we had 1 opening here that we interviewed 10 people for before we finally found somebody worth a damn.  No idea how many resumes we got but passed on.

When I hear that what it translates as is "we passed on a lot of candidates that would have probably done a great job, but we, like other companies, have decided that training an employee isn't something we want to do anymore"


We are pretty lax in our training, but that's not the issue.  Any good developer can drop in and know what he's doing.
We can't "train" you from scratch to the equivalent of a CS degree.  We certainly wouldn't pay a salary commensurate to the title of "Senior Software Engineer" if that's what we were doing.

/ We're a .NET shop, so we get a lot of applicants who have maybe written a few Visual Basic apps in some corporate IT department, but have no clue about scale or performance.  Hiring those folks in the past has proven to be a Big Mistake.
 
2013-01-16 12:00:04 PM

andhravodu: Girion47: serial_crusher: Meh, we had 1 opening here that we interviewed 10 people for before we finally found somebody worth a damn.  No idea how many resumes we got but passed on.

When I hear that what it translates as is "we passed on a lot of candidates that would have probably done a great job, but we, like other companies, have decided that training an employee isn't something we want to do anymore"

bingo. The common excuses are, "but we are critical", "we have too much pressure from management", "a noob couldn't do what we do" etc... Unless it's a hotshot startup type company, mature business processes aren't that complicated. I guess people think, I will hire this guy because he gave a great interview, not realizing that many times, the guy is coached, not experienced.


Yeah, we're on the smallish end of that spectrum.  Development team just grew from 4 to 6 (after dropping from 8 to 4 during some layoffs a year and a half ago).  So yeah, we were overloaded enough that having people take the time to teach somebody the difference between a HashSet and a List would have probably driven us out of business.

The guy who's coached through an interview is definitely a concern.  We ask everybody the same set of questions, so it would be easy to do if word got out, but we don't have any evidence that it has.  I'd hate to be in an environment like Amazon where coaching through the interview is an expected part of the process.  Every time I've been stupid enough to apply to them, their interview process has reminded me what a bad idea that would be.

Anyhow, regardless of how selective we were in hiring them, more than 10 people applied for that 1 job, so I don't find it surprising that "thousands of" people would apply for 200 jobs.
 
2013-01-16 12:14:37 PM

serial_crusher: andhravodu: Girion47: serial_crusher: Meh, we had 1 opening here that we interviewed 10 people for before we finally found somebody worth a damn.  No idea how many resumes we got but passed on.

When I hear that what it translates as is "we passed on a lot of candidates that would have probably done a great job, but we, like other companies, have decided that training an employee isn't something we want to do anymore"

bingo. The common excuses are, "but we are critical", "we have too much pressure from management", "a noob couldn't do what we do" etc... Unless it's a hotshot startup type company, mature business processes aren't that complicated. I guess people think, I will hire this guy because he gave a great interview, not realizing that many times, the guy is coached, not experienced.

Yeah, we're on the smallish end of that spectrum.  Development team just grew from 4 to 6 (after dropping from 8 to 4 during some layoffs a year and a half ago).  So yeah, we were overloaded enough that having people take the time to teach somebody the difference between a HashSet and a List would have probably driven us out of business.

The guy who's coached through an interview is definitely a concern.  We ask everybody the same set of questions, so it would be easy to do if word got out, but we don't have any evidence that it has.  I'd hate to be in an environment like Amazon where coaching through the interview is an expected part of the process.  Every time I've been stupid enough to apply to them, their interview process has reminded me what a bad idea that would be.

Anyhow, regardless of how selective we were in hiring them, more than 10 people applied for that 1 job, so I don't find it surprising that "thousands of" people would apply for 200 jobs.


I definitely understand small companies being picky as they have unique struggles. Re: coaching, chances are, if you go through a staffing firm, (including employees, not just temps) they will tell the new guys what to expect in the Interview etc.. This doesn't mean to suspect any new hires. If a person is able to go through the questions, connect the dots and get a measure of understanding as to what's expected, that's basic competence for me.
 
2013-01-16 12:17:02 PM
7000 applied for 200 jobs, in comparison if it were one job, as so many in this thread have theorized, that would be like 350 applying for one job.
 
2013-01-16 12:20:53 PM

AiryAnne: 7000 applied for 200 jobs, in comparison if it were one job, as so many in this thread have theorized, that would be like 350 applying for one job.


math is hard...
 
2013-01-16 12:23:36 PM

AiryAnne: 7000 applied for 200 jobs, in comparison if it were one job, as so many in this thread have theorized, that would be like 350 applying for one job.


Uh, I hope you're not in Accounting.
 
2013-01-16 12:28:57 PM

Nexzus: AiryAnne: 7000 applied for 200 jobs, in comparison if it were one job, as so many in this thread have theorized, that would be like 350 applying for one job.

Uh, I hope you're not in Accounting.


7000 / 200 = 35. I hope you are not a college graduate
 
2013-01-16 12:34:42 PM

andhravodu: Nexzus: AiryAnne: 7000 applied for 200 jobs, in comparison if it were one job, as so many in this thread have theorized, that would be like 350 applying for one job.

Uh, I hope you're not in Accounting.

7000 / 200 = 35. I hope you are not a collegeFourth grade graduate

 FTFY
 
jgi
2013-01-16 12:42:00 PM
Look, if 7000 people applied for 200 jobs we're talking like .0286 people per job (200/7000=.0286), which just goes to show you that management expects 1 person to do the job of 4 people. America is crazy!
 
2013-01-16 01:05:43 PM

oldcub: CSB: I applied for a low-level management job with Target when we first moved to NM on a whim. Got called in to interview. This was years ago, so my memory is fuzzy, but it was an insanely long process where they sent you to five or six different individuals to be asked the same questions over and over. I fared pretty well until it was all over and I was speaking with the HR lady. She was talking about sending me to one store clear across town for training. I asked which store on my side of town would I likely go to once triaining was completed. She said it could be any of the stores in Albuquerque. I told her that I "am not going to drive past a Target store on my way to my job at a Target store." She actually seemed shocked.

Dodged a bullet there. Got a job in construction instead and loved it.


Did you ever drive past a house under construction on your way to your construction job?

Seriously, you were being a douche.  Was Target supposed to re-assign some other low-level manager so that you could minimize your commute?
 
2013-01-16 01:06:10 PM

andhravodu: Nexzus: AiryAnne: 7000 applied for 200 jobs, in comparison if it were one job, as so many in this thread have theorized, that would be like 350 applying for one job.

Uh, I hope you're not in Accounting.

7000 / 200 = 35. I hope you are not a college graduate


I think I've been Trotsky'ed.
 
2013-01-16 01:09:13 PM

jgi: Look, if 7000 people applied for 200 jobs we're talking like .0286 people per job (200/7000=.0286), which just goes to show you that management expects 1 person to do the job of 4 people. America is crazy!


www.patentspostgrant.com
 
2013-01-16 01:16:28 PM

serial_crusher: We certainly wouldn't pay a salary commensurate to the title of "Senior Software Engineer" if that's what we were doing.


Right. Hiring "Junior Software Engineer Assistant Interns" for $12.75/hour isn't something you're doing.

But it's also not something that IBM, MS, Oracle, Cerner, local governments, or anyone really, is doing any more either. At least not in the US.

Then, after a few years where every $12/hour entry-level job is in Bangalore, guess who is ready for a mid-level role?
 
2013-01-16 01:25:27 PM

Nexzus: andhravodu: Nexzus: AiryAnne: 7000 applied for 200 jobs, in comparison if it were one job, as so many in this thread have theorized, that would be like 350 applying for one job.

Uh, I hope you're not in Accounting.

7000 / 200 = 35. I hope you are not a college graduate

I think I've been Trotsky'ed.


That's rotsky for you. get your farkism's right
 
2013-01-16 01:55:02 PM

Lawnchair: Then, after a few years where every $12/hour entry-level job is in Bangalore, guess who is ready for a mid-level role?


Then they will demand more visas because they can't fill the jobs with Americans.
 
2013-01-16 01:57:46 PM

DrewCurtisJr: Lawnchair: Then, after a few years where every $12/hour entry-level job is in Bangalore, guess who is ready for a mid-level role?

Then they will demand more visas because they can't fill the jobs with Americans.


Don't worry. By then, the Indian companies with sweetheart government deals will be ready to buy out the American ones that have been bled dry.
 
2013-01-16 02:06:42 PM

BarkingUnicorn: oldcub: CSB: I applied for a low-level management job with Target when we first moved to NM on a whim. Got called in to interview. This was years ago, so my memory is fuzzy, but it was an insanely long process where they sent you to five or six different individuals to be asked the same questions over and over. I fared pretty well until it was all over and I was speaking with the HR lady. She was talking about sending me to one store clear across town for training. I asked which store on my side of town would I likely go to once triaining was completed. She said it could be any of the stores in Albuquerque. I told her that I "am not going to drive past a Target store on my way to my job at a Target store." She actually seemed shocked.

Dodged a bullet there. Got a job in construction instead and loved it.

Did you ever drive past a house under construction on your way to your construction job?

Seriously, you were being a douche.  Was Target supposed to re-assign some other low-level manager so that you could minimize your commute?


I assumed they would be able to search for open positions in a specific area of town. I may have been a jerk, but I was exhausted from a five-hour interview process, upset that nobody there thought to mention the lack of consideration for commute time at the beginning, and had other options. I thought I was doing both of is a favor.
 
2013-01-16 02:10:44 PM

oldcub: CSB: I applied for a low-level management job with Target when we first moved to NM on a whim. Got called in to interview. This was years ago, so my memory is fuzzy, but it was an insanely long process where they sent you to five or six different individuals to be asked the same questions over and over. I fared pretty well until it was all over and I was speaking with the HR lady. She was talking about sending me to one store clear across town for training. I asked which store on my side of town would I likely go to once triaining was completed. She said it could be any of the stores in Albuquerque. I told her that I "am not going to drive past a Target store on my way to my job at a Target store." She actually seemed shocked.

Dodged a bullet there. Got a job in construction instead and loved it.



The stupid is strong with this one.
 
2013-01-16 02:21:07 PM

andhravodu: if you go through a staffing firm, (including employees, not just temps) they will tell the new guys what to expect in the Interview etc.. This doesn't mean to suspect any new hires. If a person is able to go through the questions, connect the dots and get a measure of understanding as to what's expected, that's basic competence for me.


Yeah, I had a job at a Too Big to Fail bank before it drove me insane and I moved to the small company I'm at now.  The recruiter gave me a "study sheet" with the exact questions they'd ask and told me not to let anybody know I had it.
Once I was there it was a pretty common joke that everybody had seen that cheat sheet and that still a bunch of people couldn't muster it.
If you had seen some of the people who did pass that test though... not so good.

We hire outside recruiters on a contract basis.  Not really "staffing firms", but one person who comes in to recruit for our various open spots.  My "we interviewed a ton of people before we found a smart one" experience did also coincidentally end with the recruiter being fired, and the new recruiter sending us good people all of a sudden.
 
2013-01-16 02:39:06 PM
In my experience with hiring people.....if you've got 35 applicants for a single position....

30 are not qualified. They don't have experience. They don't have qualifications. They didn't manage to fill out the paperwork correctly. They misspell common words on their application/resume/cover letter. They can't carry on a basic conversation with you. They show up to the interview inappropriately dressed. etc, etc....
 
2013-01-16 02:52:14 PM

oldcub: CSB: I applied for a low-level management job with Target when we first moved to NM on a whim. Got called in to interview. This was years ago, so my memory is fuzzy, but it was an insanely long process where they sent you to five or six different individuals to be asked the same questions over and over. I fared pretty well until it was all over and I was speaking with the HR lady. She was talking about sending me to one store clear across town for training. I asked which store on my side of town would I likely go to once triaining was completed. She said it could be any of the stores in Albuquerque. I told her that I "am not going to drive past a Target store on my way to my job at a Target store." She actually seemed shocked.


One side of ABQ to the other is, well, not quite nothing but nearly. At Walmart, past a certain low level, store management is always hired from outside their community. They're swapped around so often that many of them just live in Residence Inns. This helps exclude people with families (= more time in the store). And it keeps people from having any interests at all except the glory of Walmart.

To me, it's one of the biggest differences between Walmart and the early-80s K-Mart of my youth. Big chain, sure. But, the K-Mart manager's son was a Scout with me. He had worked his way up in the same store since high school. He was manager for over 20 years. Hired people who needed hired, did his best not to be a jerk in scheduling, was active in the Chamber of Commerce, etc, etc. Or, as post-Sam Walmart would call him, "soft".
 
2013-01-16 03:07:26 PM
A few years ago my old boss was a complete bible thumping holier than thou tool. He hired his buddies from church to some of the better jobs and paid them well. Then after 3 months he would get a $300 bonus for recomending them. The rest of the people there never got anyone they recomended hired because he was such an ass. If I or someone else he didnt hire screwed up we would get our as chewed out for our mistake. But if one of his buddys screwed up he would gather the whole group together and yell at them because the "team" screwed up. He hired a lot of worthless motherfarkers, so we had to go to a lot of those team screwed up meetings. He was such an insperation to us all he said he would fire us all and have at least 30 people each to replace us that would be happy to work for him. Glad he got fired for sexual harrasment. But took the comapny long enough to get rid of him.
 
2013-01-16 03:35:46 PM
serial_crusher: "Anyhow, regardless of how selective we were in hiring them, more than 10 people applied for that 1 job, so I don't find it surprising that "thousands of" people would apply for 200 jobs."

The math in this thread assumes each position could be applied for individually, as in 5 to 10 people each applied 200 times. However, for most retail positions you fill out one company-wide application. So it is possible thousands of people did apply to work at Targé.

/applications for management positions may differ
//object in mirror may be closer than they appear
 
2013-01-16 03:35:48 PM

Fizpez: So when it hits the news that there will be 200 jobs available (thus greatly increasing the number of people aware of the openings) even 10 applicants per spot puts you in to the thousands.


Yes but looking at it another way, 8500 people will be turned away and jobless.
 
2013-01-16 04:27:42 PM
a search of Google for this story only pulls RT (an anti-US, Israel & EU news org, state-owned by Russia), right wing hack sites like World Net Daily, and Fark.

hmmmmmmmm.
 
2013-01-16 05:41:20 PM

dumbobruni: a search of Google for this story only pulls RT (an anti-US, Israel & EU news org, state-owned by Russia), right wing hack sites like World Net Daily, and Fark.

hmmmmmmmm.


How about an Albuquerque news station: Link

That one says hundreds, but it was on the first day of a four day job fair, plus they were taking internet applications, so thousands wouldn't surprise me.
 
2013-01-16 06:51:08 PM

sure haven't: Wasn't there some McDonald's job a while back that got like 18,000 applications?

What a sad depressing future we live in. I always wondered why those dystopian movies depicted societies with only two groups. One being extremely wealthy, the other in abject poverty. Now I know why (the writers were gawdammed geniuses).


Yay Clinton. At least he got that Chinese campaign money.
 
2013-01-16 08:37:32 PM

Lawnchair: serial_crusher: We certainly wouldn't pay a salary commensurate to the title of "Senior Software Engineer" if that's what we were doing.

Right. Hiring "Junior Software Engineer Assistant Interns" for $12.75/hour isn't something you're doing.

But it's also not something that IBM, MS, Oracle, Cerner, local governments, or anyone really, is doing any more either. At least not in the US.

Then, after a few years where every $12/hour entry-level job is in Bangalore, guess who is ready for a mid-level role?


That's proving to be a bit of a problem in aviation, everyone is interested in hiring middle time pilots but very few operators are willing to train someone up to the level they need so you've got a moderately high number of people who get their licence and then don't ever find work.

Then again the new pilots don't help, a lot of the time once a pilot gets enough hours to make a bit more money they jump ship and end up costing the company that trained them a good pile of cash.
 
2013-01-16 09:33:30 PM
As someone who just got a rejection for employment notice from "Tarjay" today, I'm getting a slightly almost kickish effect out of this.

/Nowhere near either Mexico, New or Old
 
2013-01-16 09:39:23 PM

change1211: Then again the new pilots don't help, a lot of the time once a pilot gets enough hours to make a bit more money they jump ship and end up costing the company that trained them a good pile of cash.


Why don't those companies offer the trainees more money to stay? Top pay for top talent, and all that? If that isn't how the game is played, very little fault lies with the pilots.
 
2013-01-17 12:30:58 AM

Sergeant Grumbles: Why don't those companies offer the trainees more money to stay? Top pay for top talent, and all that?


Because that required long term (multi year planning) and from the top down in companies they can't figure out how to incentivize people for that long term of a view. So people only plan quarter to quarter and if they can make some number at the end of the quarter to get a bonus they will.

I read an interesting article recently about how we should have capital gains taxes but their percentage goes down the longer you hold the asset. So if you're investing in an R&D lab for 6 years it gets taxed at 20%,19%, etc down to 14%. Instead now with the same rate (and some idiots that want to get rid of it) it encourages people to get things off the books as soon as possible.
 
2013-01-18 10:33:49 PM
We had 189 applicants for an entry-level position that was posted online for 3 weeks. We've interviewed 4 so far, and may interview all 189 candidates if it means getting an employee who actually fits the position.
 
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