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(NBC News)   At least the escape chutes work properly, which is about all that work properly on the Boeing 787   (worldnews.nbcnews.com) divider line 61
    More: Fail, Boeing, Japan, emergency landing, All Nippon Airways, Japan Airlines, critical system, model aircraft, error messages  
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4461 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Jan 2013 at 1:22 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-16 12:27:54 AM
If it's Boeing, I'm not going...


/Actually I think I'd prefer going in a 747, 37 or 57 than an Airbus.

And I've flown in the Russian copy of the DC10, that's how brave I am.
 
2013-01-16 12:54:02 AM
Funny how the bugs are not the revolutionary composite materials. Sensors talking to the computers, windows, batteries, all stuff that should have been the fairly routine part of building a plane.

/unless the decided to re-design everything because they be out of a job if they didn't.
 
2013-01-16 01:10:58 AM
It's against the law to tamper with, disable, or destroy smoke defectors.
 
2013-01-16 01:16:06 AM
So, we still calling these normal issues with a new plane?
 
2013-01-16 01:24:00 AM
The escape chute works like a dream.
 
2013-01-16 01:24:27 AM

WhyteRaven74: So, we still calling these normal issues with a new plane?


Yep... It takes a while to work all the bugs out of a completely new airframe.

I'll not worry overmuch unless one of them drops an engine or otherwise actually *fails*, or .. if this crap is still going on this time next year.
 
zez
2013-01-16 01:24:38 AM
Thank goodness Boeing is too big to fail, they employ a lot of people in St. Louis.
 
2013-01-16 01:24:38 AM

LordOfThePings: It's against the law to tamper with, disable, or destroy smoke defectors.


I like to fondle them.
 
2013-01-16 01:25:15 AM

LordOfThePings: It's against the law to tamper with, disable, or destroy smoke defectors.


It's more appropriate to send them off to a gulag.
 
2013-01-16 01:27:48 AM
They can't even get the side-mounted passenger howitzer to work properly. How am I supposed to enjoy my flight if I know they can't even randomly fire passengers into the tarmac during landing and takeoff?
 
2013-01-16 01:27:50 AM

jimmyego: LordOfThePings: It's against the law to tamper with, disable, or destroy smoke defectors.

I like to fondle them.


go on ...
 
2013-01-16 01:37:33 AM
Where is the scarebus guy?
 
2013-01-16 01:42:21 AM
Where was the component made? The 787 was a victim of Boeing Management outsourcing and trying to 'break the unions' like the 777 before it. My guess is the system was a faulty low bid chinese or southeast asia part.
 
2013-01-16 01:45:20 AM
Dreamliner? More like Nightmareliner, amirite?
 
2013-01-16 01:46:37 AM
Screamliner.
 
2013-01-16 01:46:41 AM
Did Airbus buy some free beer for Drew within the past few months. So much Dreamliner hate going on right now.
 
2013-01-16 01:50:28 AM
"Japan after error messages indicated there was a problem with the plane's batteries and smoke in the plane."

It runs on batteries? Well there's your problem right there... I know jet fuel's expensive and all, but that's a lot of D-cells.
 
2013-01-16 01:50:44 AM

whither_apophis: Funny how the bugs are not the revolutionary composite materials. Sensors talking to the computers, windows, batteries, all stuff that should have been the fairly routine part of building a plane.

/unless the decided to re-design everything because they be out of a job if they didn't.


Boeing outsourced all that stuff. The 787 was intended to be a revolution in the development of commercial aircraft. The various technologies were already around, but this is the first time it's all being put together in this fashion. The whole thing has been farmed out to a bunch of different subs and they're all doing their own thing and then bringing it together to create the whole plane. A friend of mine works for one of the subcontractors involved in the testing of various aircraft systems. A LOT of the subsystem integration tests are done as computer-based simulations in order to save time and money. Whenever he tells me stories about some of the goings-on, I just politely listen and nod my head (while mentally making a note to never fly on a 787). Right now, they're involved in re-testing when the re-works come back through the process. He told me that they get paid no matter how many times this happens. Even though they've already passed the subsystems that eventually fail and come back for re-work, they still get paid to re-test everything. What a scam. I told him that this allows for a serious lack of accountability. He said that it's just a part of doing business. In other words, even when all the testing paperwork looks right, it's still a crapshoot as to whether or not a successful test was really successful.
 
2013-01-16 01:55:26 AM
That is all I care about on a plane. Who cares what ELSE works, if you can't get out if the stuff DOESN'T work.
 
2013-01-16 01:56:21 AM

Oznog: "Japan after error messages indicated there was a problem with the plane's batteries and smoke in the plane."

It runs on batteries? Well there's your problem right there... I know jet fuel's expensive and all, but that's a lot of D-cells.


Obviously you are not an aironaughtical engineer. The batteries are charged via wind turbine.
 
2013-01-16 02:09:31 AM
So is there a lemon law?
 
2013-01-16 02:14:28 AM
There's no such thing as bad publicity.
 
2013-01-16 02:18:42 AM
Fark Me To Tears

Who doesn't want to beta test a commercial jet with their life?
 
2013-01-16 02:29:50 AM
Once is an accident, twice is coincidence, three times is a problem... Perhaps Boeing should produce more 777s instead; they're certainly safer. And start building the 767 again. I'll take either of those over an Airbus or Dreamliner.

/flew on an A320 a few days ago
//quite comfortable, 737s can sometimes be uncomfortable for tall people
 
2013-01-16 02:32:58 AM
Boeing is a vital part of the American economy. Sales of Boeing planes are a decent factor in narrowing the trade deficit. I hate to see them do poorly, especially on this otherwise great new product.
 
2013-01-16 02:35:04 AM
Good thing they saved money by going Non-union building them in south Carolina.
 
2013-01-16 02:38:07 AM

Paris1127: Once is an accident, twice is coincidence, three times is a problem... Perhaps Boeing should produce more 777s instead; they're certainly safer. And start building the 767 again. I'll take either of those over an Airbus or Dreamliner.

/flew on an A320 a few days ago
//quite comfortable, 737s can sometimes be uncomfortable for tall people


Boeing just increased the production rate on 777s and is still building 767s and is ramping up the 767 lines for the tanker contract.

The 757 is the one they don't make anymore.

/prefers Boeing control philosophy
//but A320 over 737 for the extra inch of seat width due to the wider fuselage
 
2013-01-16 02:44:51 AM
Scarebus vs. ScreamLiner

Fight !
 
2013-01-16 02:56:25 AM
Someone need to tell this plane flights are non-smoking now.
 
2013-01-16 03:12:14 AM

TV's Vinnie: Did Airbus buy some free beer for Drew within the past few months. So much Dreamliner hate going on right now.


Considering the last week or two has been "Another new plane built using suspect practices goes up in smoke. This is not a repeat." I'd say it's concern, rather than hate.
 
2013-01-16 03:16:00 AM

HiFiGuy: Boeing is a vital part of the American economy. Sales of Boeing planes are a decent factor in narrowing the trade deficit. I hate to see them do poorly, especially on this otherwise great new product.


Is this still the case now that they are "Maed in China"?
 
2013-01-16 03:44:26 AM

powhound: Oznog: "Japan after error messages indicated there was a problem with the plane's batteries and smoke in the plane."

It runs on batteries? Well there's your problem right there... I know jet fuel's expensive and all, but that's a lot of D-cells.

Obviously you are not an aironaughtical engineer. The batteries are charged via wind turbine.


i1.kym-cdn.com

TURBINES DO NOT WORK THAT WAY!
 
2013-01-16 03:46:17 AM
Any sufficiently advanced and complex collection of technology systems is going to have teething problems.

They just don't usually resemble Shane MacGowan's.

Perhaps a sign of the apocalypse is when the number of headlines for a smoky Dreamliner forced landing matches the number of female teachers having sex with their male teenaged students headlines.

I know it's a false analogy, but I also know "false analogy" doesn't mean a tracking error while doing it doggy-style.
 
2013-01-16 03:52:09 AM

Valiente: Any sufficiently advanced and complex collection of technology systems is going to have teething problems.

They just don't usually resemble Shane MacGowan's.

Perhaps a sign of the apocalypse is when the number of headlines for a smoky Dreamliner forced landing matches the number of female teachers having sex with their male teenaged students headlines.

I know it's a false analogy, but I also know "false analogy" doesn't mean a tracking error while doing it doggy-style.


However, as stated up the thread, it's not the complex stuff that's failing. It's things like batteries, glue, and the carpet.
 
2013-01-16 04:01:23 AM
This sounds like a classic outsourcing train wreck. This sort of thing is happening in every industry throughout the American economy. The new paradigm for everything is to fire every single American worker who was doing something, bring together a poorly planned, mismatched train wreck of pieces built overseas, throw the thing together, profit massively, and ignore the resulting catastrophic failure.
 
2013-01-16 04:02:28 AM

digistil: Valiente: Any sufficiently advanced and complex collection of technology systems is going to have teething problems.

They just don't usually resemble Shane MacGowan's.

Perhaps a sign of the apocalypse is when the number of headlines for a smoky Dreamliner forced landing matches the number of female teachers having sex with their male teenaged students headlines.

I know it's a false analogy, but I also know "false analogy" doesn't mean a tracking error while doing it doggy-style.

However, as stated up the thread, it's not the complex stuff that's failing. It's things like batteries, glue, and the carpet.


Q? A!
 
2013-01-16 04:10:46 AM
I hope everything was OK in the bukkake lounge.
 
2013-01-16 04:14:19 AM
Haven't we been wondering why the software industry is the only one who gets away with releasing unfinished crap that will maybe be patched later? Well, they aren't anymore.

/looking forward to my flight to Japan in three months
//wonder what plane will be used
 
2013-01-16 04:34:27 AM

lucksi: Haven't we been wondering why the software industry is the only one who gets away with releasing unfinished crap that will maybe be patched later? Well, they aren't anymore.


But to be perfectly fair, there's plenty of software involved in any modern airliner.
 
2013-01-16 04:35:21 AM
Well what do you expect from an airplane built with public money?
 
2013-01-16 05:33:20 AM

HiFiGuy: Boeing is a vital part of the American economy. Sales of Boeing planes are a decent factor in narrowing the trade deficit. I hate to see them do poorly, especially on this otherwise great new product.


I'm not even going to Google this, but I'll bet Boeing is infested with union workers.

1. Made in the U.S.A.
2. Sucks
3. Located on a coast
 
2013-01-16 06:11:55 AM

bmihura: 1. Made in the U.S.A.


Not exactly...
img267.imageshack.us
 
2013-01-16 07:29:54 AM
Hypothetically speaking.... what if these arent manufacturing defects at all, and these problems are more the side effect of some type of union wage dispute or something?
 
2013-01-16 07:36:25 AM

Circusdog320: So is there a lemon law?


It's called JAL suing Boeing for non-delivery of a functional aircraft. Two mega legal departments go toe-to-toe in a massive litigation-royalle. Boeing tries to pass the blame onto a subcontractor, and JAL noting that their contract is with Boeing. And in that contract one of the deliverables was A FUNCTIONAL AIRCRAFT THAT PASSES ALL APPLICABLE SAFETY REGULATIONS.

And hopefully, at some point, whoever was responsible for this clusterfark of an airplane getting placed in a room with a knife and a towel.
 
2013-01-16 07:37:01 AM

Alonjar: Hypothetically speaking.... what if these arent manufacturing defects at all, and these problems are more the side effect of some type of union wage dispute or something?


Except that Boeing deliberately didn't use Union labor.
 
2013-01-16 07:46:17 AM
fox business news blamed it on the unions, some silly blonde stated that boing is not in business to create jobs, and the engineers are like spoiled children who want a trophy even if they don't win.
 
2013-01-16 07:52:01 AM
I mentioned this last week, but the new reports are  totally instilling confidence in my flight to LAX tomorrow on a United 787...
 
2013-01-16 08:23:30 AM
From the article:  ANA said it evacuated 129 passengers and eight crew members from the Dreamliner after measuring instruments in the flight's cockpit indicated there was a battery malfunction and the pilot smelled something strange.

The copilot had probably eaten one of these a few hours before the flight:
www.donmiguel.com
 
2013-01-16 09:16:50 AM

Evil Twin Skippy: Alonjar: Hypothetically speaking.... what if these arent manufacturing defects at all, and these problems are more the side effect of some type of union wage dispute or something?

Except that Boeing deliberately didn't use Union labor.


I dont mean Boeing, I mean the maintenance/ground crews.
 
2013-01-16 09:31:46 AM

Alonjar: Evil Twin Skippy: Alonjar: Hypothetically speaking.... what if these arent manufacturing defects at all, and these problems are more the side effect of some type of union wage dispute or something?

Except that Boeing deliberately didn't use Union labor.

I dont mean Boeing, I mean the maintenance/ground crews.


Except that you are talking about ground crews working in a completely different country for a completely different organization, and in the case of Japan, one in which failure to do one's job successfully often prompts thoughts of suicide.
 
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