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(Slate)   Everyone who thinks they found life in a meteorite take one step forward. Not so fast, guy who thinks SARS and the flu came from space   (slate.com) divider line 42
    More: Silly, meteorites, SARS, chemical analysis, olivine, flu  
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2174 clicks; posted to Geek » on 15 Jan 2013 at 5:32 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-15 05:13:11 PM
Phil Plait is writing for Slate.

Slate is owned by the Washington Post (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Mockingbird)

The Washington Post is owned by Donald Graham, an "invitee" of the Bilderberg Group (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_E._Graham) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bilderberg_Group) "an annual, unofficial, invitation-only conference of approximately 120 to 140 guests from North America and Western Europe, most of whom are people of influence.[2][3] About one-third are from government and politics, and two-thirds from finance, industry, labour, education and communications.[2] Meetings are closed to the public."

Plait has past ties to NASA, and NASA has performed many missions for the CIA, even today, flying the WB-57 over Afghanistan based only 2,000 miles from where this meteor "landed"

Look, I'm just asking questions and pointing out some connections, but I do take Plait's desire that we discount the extraterrestrial life in that "meteorite" seriously.

People might ask, why is Phil so concerned over something he claims is certainly not true? Who would stand to gain if citizens of the world ignored this obvious hoax invasion?
Anyway, at the least, I am glad this discussion can finally be held in the open.
 
2013-01-15 05:24:34 PM
So... swine flu is caused by...

PIGS
IN
SPA-ACE!
 
2013-01-15 05:36:44 PM
You can see the peanut right there
 
2013-01-15 05:42:21 PM
That lunkhead
 
2013-01-15 06:03:19 PM
RoyBatty Your logic, as always, is unassailable.
 
2013-01-15 06:05:43 PM

The Bad Astronomer: RoyBatty Your logic, as always, is unassailable.


I just spent the last several weeks rewatching the X-Files. I'm still suffering a bit of withdrawal.
 
2013-01-15 06:08:07 PM
Just be careful not to drop the meteorite

1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-01-15 06:14:52 PM
Through Kaplan Test Prep, the Washington Post, that is the CIA/Bilderberg group has been able to subtly alter young American perceptions for generations. Is it any wonder that a nation that would have been alarmed by this meteorite in 1947 is now barely aware of it?

And that message of non-chalance, trust "government scientists" is overtly relayed by Phil Plait in his blog.

Once more we have to understand that the "The FBI most important media asset was Walter Winchell."
 
2013-01-15 06:16:52 PM
Wait, the "academic" journal called Phil Plait a "wannabe astronomer"? I've heard some petty criticisms thrown his way, but to accuse him of not actually being an astronomer is pretty lol-worthy. Didn't he work on COBE, Hubble, and Fermi, amongst other things?
 
2013-01-15 06:32:32 PM
I found life in an old jar of miracle whip in the back of my fridge. Does that count?
 
2013-01-15 06:35:05 PM
Not only does that headline use a tired cliché, but it doesn't even make any sense.
 
2013-01-15 06:38:37 PM
As long as it doesn't contain a symbiote that'll make me disco-dance down the street, we cool.
 
2013-01-15 06:40:05 PM

ArcadianRefugee: Not only does that headline use a tired cliché, but it doesn't even make any sense.


How could an alien lifeform (virus) have evolved to be able to infect us?
 
2013-01-15 06:42:22 PM

GRCooper: ArcadianRefugee: Not only does that headline use a tired cliché, but it doesn't even make any sense.

How could an alien lifeform (virus) have evolved to be able to infect us?


Do viruses even qualify as a life form?
 
2013-01-15 06:43:50 PM
"In other words, all the diatoms shown in the paper are from known species on Earth. That makes it somewhat less likely they are native to space. And by somewhat, I mean completely. Like, zero chance they are from space."

So, he doesn't understand panspermia.

If microbial life is truly carried by comets from planet to planet, then the chances of any microbial life being unique to one planet is slim. With every planet the microbes become abundant on, which ends up breaking into asteroids and comets for whatever reason, then those land on other planets, which in turn become populated and then spread to other planets when the planet meets its end, you'd expect to find the same microbes on various planets from that kind of exponential growth.
 
2013-01-15 06:49:53 PM
That's just a big ol' frozen chunk of poopy.
 
2013-01-15 06:54:52 PM

The Jami Turman Fan Club: GRCooper: ArcadianRefugee: Not only does that headline use a tired cliché, but it doesn't even make any sense.

How could an alien lifeform (virus) have evolved to be able to infect us?

Do viruses even qualify as a life form?


They carry genetic material, reproduce, and evolve, so the argument can be made as such.
 
2013-01-15 07:09:38 PM
memeimages.com

/Patient zero
 
2013-01-15 07:22:48 PM

GRCooper: They carry genetic material, reproduce, and evolve, so the argument can be made as such.


Well, sort of. They can't actually reproduce by themselves. They have to hijack the cellular resources of living cell to reproduce. In fact, they have to hijack the resources of a living cell to do just about any active chemistry associated with life, since they have no active metabolism or energy production mechanism of their own. It's exactly like asking "is a strand of DNA / RNA alive?", since that is essentially what they are.

Then to make it even more blurry, there's prions. Which are just proteins. Not even any genetic material in the conventional sense. But they can reproduce, (make exact copies of themselves using surrounding material), and they are also shown to evolve based on environmental conditions.
 
2013-01-15 07:30:50 PM

RoyBatty: Look, I'm just asking questions and pointing out some connections, but I do take Plait's desire that we discount the extraterrestrial life in that "meteorite" seriously.


...when we find extraterrestrial life in that meteorite, you can take it seriously.
 
2013-01-15 07:37:59 PM

J. Frank Parnell: "In other words, all the diatoms shown in the paper are from known species on Earth. That makes it somewhat less likely they are native to space. And by somewhat, I mean completely. Like, zero chance they are from space."

So, he doesn't understand panspermia.

If microbial life is truly carried by comets from planet to planet, then the chances of any microbial life being unique to one planet is slim.


So, you don't understand genetic drift and ring species.

Even if the microbes from a fragment of a comet gave the earth life billions of years ago, and those microbes' descendants still lived on that comet today, and that same comet dropped another fragment onto the earth today...the microbes from that comet would be vastly different from those found on Earth today, since both microbes have undergone billions of years' worth of speciation in vastly different environments. Any cometary fragment with life on it today would contain microbes that are dissimilar from any microbes that have spent billions of years in an earth environment.

/I mean, if ensatina salamanders can evolve so that daughter species can't interbreed in different parts of California alone, how different would cometary microbes be from earthen microbes?
 
2013-01-15 07:39:04 PM

GRCooper: The Jami Turman Fan Club: GRCooper: ArcadianRefugee: Not only does that headline use a tired cliché, but it doesn't even make any sense.

How could an alien lifeform (virus) have evolved to be able to infect us?

Do viruses even qualify as a life form?

They carry genetic material, reproduce, and evolve, so the argument can be made as such.


To qualify as life, a body must be able to maintain an internal metabolism. Viruses can't do that, so aren't considered alive.
 
2013-01-15 07:53:26 PM

IlGreven: GRCooper: The Jami Turman Fan Club: GRCooper: ArcadianRefugee: Not only does that headline use a tired cliché, but it doesn't even make any sense.

How could an alien lifeform (virus) have evolved to be able to infect us?

Do viruses even qualify as a life form?

They carry genetic material, reproduce, and evolve, so the argument can be made as such.

To qualify as life, a body must be able to maintain an internal metabolism. Viruses can't do that, so aren't considered alive.


Not a biologist, so I'm just gonna say a virus is listed as "non-cellular life", so I stand by "argument could be made" and you argument is with Phylogenetics, not me :-)

In any case, my original point wasn't whether a virus is alive or not, but whether SARS is likely to have dropped from space (re: the headline).
 
2013-01-15 08:10:17 PM
The Bad Astronomer:

I'm so sorry you had to spend time out of your day addressing this hoax, but thank you.
 
2013-01-15 08:13:05 PM
I've read the papers by Fred Hoyle (and other writings of his) about viruses from space and other things like the life forms in the stratosphere. it is all fascinating and at the time it was written, it had a lot of merit. NASA, for example, did not sample the parts of the stratosphere that the Russians did, and Hoyle was arguing that shiatty budgeting for NASA was preventing Americans from debunking a very plausible bunch of papers from Russian scientists.

That said...those theories are all over. The work Hoyle did for them was extremely important even today, though, since he pioneered the ways that we discovered sugars and other life-related molecules in nebulae. Also, the Gaia Hypothesis has been important as a foundation for systems theory and environmental science. again though, Hoyle's really good work is over. I know his contributions because I study and teach science history, not science-in-action.

This other dude is just Hoyle's most famous and persistent acolyte, though, and an unfortunately well-funded torch-bearer for out-of-date ideas.
 
2013-01-15 08:38:18 PM

GRCooper: ArcadianRefugee: Not only does that headline use a tired cliché, but it doesn't even make any sense.

How could an alien lifeform (virus) have evolved to be able to infect us?


I was referring more to the headline's cliché use, since it is only initially asking for people to step forward if they think they have found life, not if they have found life.
 
2013-01-15 08:47:25 PM
This whole story is a cover up. The real threat is SPORE ! Adam Chance unavailable for comment.
 
2013-01-15 08:59:23 PM
Of course all this stuff came from space.

WE'RE IN SPACE
 
2013-01-15 09:11:44 PM

GRCooper: In any case, my original point wasn't whether a virus is alive or not, but whether SARS is likely to have dropped from space (re: the headline).


Hoyle's original theory was not based on what a virus is made out of. At the time they didn't have a very good picture of what was inside of viruses. His theory was kind of cool. European epidemiology maps showed a fairly obvious distribution of diseases within nations, as if diseases were being spread from person to person, house to house. however, some maps showed weird distributions of diseases that didn't make sense if they spread that way.

Hoyle and some other investigators looked at maps of the continent as a whole and found that the maps simply didn't look the same for all of Europe as they did for the regional studies. Diseases like the flu seemed to be spread by a stronger pattern than person-to-person contact. in fact, wind seemed important somehow. So, one possible explanation was that viruses were travelling through the atmosphere. Hoyle thought that this might confirm one of his theories: that individuals little bits of junk DNA were made in space, where they could combine to form viruses. then our solar system would pass through those clouds of dust that contained viruses and the bits of viruses.

it was just a freaky co-incidence that the epi maps of the time, from European health agencies, looked like the epi maps that his giant space could theory would have required.
 
2013-01-15 09:26:10 PM
Came for Andromeda Strain, leaving feeling very, very old.
 
2013-01-15 09:34:34 PM
Back when I was freelancing as a frozen drink recovery specialist (read Icee Pirate) for the Somali Hydration Corps we found a virus that we later found was from space.

Off the horn of Africa we hijacked a shipment of Chinese knock-off Icee machines bound for Abu Dhabi. We set the Chinamen adrift and set to chewing some khat and eating some dik dik jerky when we noticed what we thought at first was a langostino climbing on the shoulder of a passed out Jumbutu. (Too much khat and Jumbutu keels over like a poached rhino.)

Jumbutu jumped up and the thing ran under a console.

Jumbutu said he had seen what looked like an egg or coccoon in one of the boxes in the one of the cargo holds so we went and checked it out. When we checked out the box there was indeed some sort of egg inside, but it had hatched between the first time Jumbutu saw it and when we opened the box the second time. We immediately got the manifest and what we found was very frightening to us. It listed the contents of that box as "Space Herpes".

The Chinese space program had apparently found these eggs growing on the outside of one of its secret space laboratories where they were doing research into growing tiger penises in zero gravity. (Apparently null grav tiger penis is to Viagra as Viagra is to aspirin.) Chinese genetic testing (margin of error ± 63%) revealed the macroviral "Space Herpe" was a virus-based organism that was not of Earth origin.

We ended up battling a squad of Chinese Marines in a weird battle where time seemed to follow no rules; speeding up and slowing down all willy-nilly. The whole trip was frought with danger and, in fact, at one point we were nearly "nutted" by an evil princess. It was all very off-putting.

After that heist I retired from Icee piracy. I recently moved to Detroit to drive a cab. I am leaving that life of conflict far, far behind me.
 
2013-01-15 09:37:48 PM
images.zap2it.com
 
2013-01-15 10:09:07 PM

Bennie Crabtree: I've read the papers by Fred Hoyle (and other writings of his) about viruses from space and other things like the life forms in the stratosphere. it is all fascinating and at the time it was written, it had a lot of merit. NASA, for example, did not sample the parts of the stratosphere that the Russians did, and Hoyle was arguing that shiatty budgeting for NASA was preventing Americans from debunking a very plausible bunch of papers from Russian scientists.

That said...those theories are all over. The work Hoyle did for them was extremely important even today, though, since he pioneered the ways that we discovered sugars and other life-related molecules in nebulae. Also, the Gaia Hypothesis has been important as a foundation for systems theory and environmental science. again though, Hoyle's really good work is over. I know his contributions because I study and teach science history, not science-in-action.

This other dude is just Hoyle's most famous and persistent acolyte, though, and an unfortunately well-funded torch-bearer for out-of-date ideas.


They also get quoted by AIVAS in one of Anne McCaffery's Pern novels, in relation to Thread.
 
2013-01-15 11:19:22 PM

Toshiro Mifune's Letter Opener: As long as it doesn't contain a symbiote that'll make me disco-dance down the street, we cool.


Hm... What he said, but the opposite.
 
2013-01-15 11:29:51 PM
The Bad Astronomer: ...

Looks like you were hitting the Tranya before 'shopping that image.
 
2013-01-16 12:02:38 AM

Bondith: They also get quoted by AIVAS in one of Anne McCaffery's Pern novels, in relation to Thread.


Cool!
 
2013-01-16 01:29:07 AM
Reminds, the series finale to Fringe is coming up this week, I must buy some red licorice.
 
2013-01-16 01:29:36 AM

GRCooper: How could an alien lifeform (virus) have evolved to be able to infect us?


i131.photobucket.com
 
2013-01-16 04:28:32 AM

The Jami Turman Fan Club: GRCooper: ArcadianRefugee: Not only does that headline use a tired cliché, but it doesn't even make any sense.

How could an alien lifeform (virus) have evolved to be able to infect us?

Do viruses even qualify as a life form?


On earth, it's questionable, but from outer space? Willing to make an exception, considering most planets are barren wastes of rock or gas. Something scooting around there would be crazy news.

And rhinovirus is a pretty successful, smart virus. Doesn't kill the hosts so its offspring lives longer.
 
2013-01-16 06:49:16 AM

StopLurkListen: The Bad Astronomer:

I'm so sorry you had to spend time out of your day addressing this hoax, but thank you.


You still have a little bit in one nostril.
 
2013-01-16 09:24:26 AM
Well fark, I was excited about that one briefly.
 
2013-01-16 10:09:19 AM

MFAWG: Came for Andromeda Strain, leaving feeling very, very old.


Time to drink up, for defense.
 
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