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(The Next Web)   Old and busted: Telling you to where to plug in the keyboard before pressing F1. New hotness: I'm sure your sysadmin will be delighted to assist you in figuring out where to insert the Windows installation disc   (thenextweb.com) divider line 17
    More: Fail, Windows, library, BSoD, optical discs, Windows installation, introduction, error messages  
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5871 clicks; posted to Geek » on 15 Jan 2013 at 3:07 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2013-01-15 03:49:21 PM
2 votes:

meanmutton: I don't know why anyone really would WANT an optical drive.


People still own a lot of media stored on disks.
Some people like to OWN their software instead of just leasing it.
Slow download speeds can make for long frustrating waits.
People like to back up files.
Some folks don't trust the "cloud" and who can blame them?
There are a lot more reasons but that should give you the general idea.
2013-01-15 03:36:49 PM
2 votes:

styckx: Why are people making ROMs for a closed source OS? How much improvement can you possibly do without any source code?


I read that error as the boot loader not finding the OS code, so they're probably not trying to mess with Windows Phone 8, so much as trying to boot some other OS on the hardware.
2013-01-15 10:49:30 PM
1 votes:

ProfessorOhki: rickane58: Twilight Farkle: But if you have physical posession of a readable disc, your rights under that license cannot be unilaterally revoked by the vendor, say, by shutting down the activation server. (What happened last week at a certain large software vendor was wonderful, and I hope it sets a de facto industry precedent as the first generations of online-activation-required software reach EOL, but they were under no obligation to do so.)
I have no clue what you're talking about. Can you be a little less obtuse? I would like to know more...

I assume they're referring to this: Link and didn't read any follow ups.


That. Adobe decided that it was shutting down the CS2 activation servers, and graciously distributed the goods. The original intention was that distribution be limited to the original purchaser/registered user.

Mad_Radhu:
There's a lot of people who bought boxed copies of Assassin's Creed 2 who would disagree vehemently with you on that point. For modern software that requires authentication (Photoshop, Windows, Office, etc) having the software on disk makes the activation process for the software no different than if you had just downloaded the install files. Hell, for a lot of software, you can just download the ISO and burn a disk any time you want a new one, so there's absolutely nothing special about having a physical disk.


I should have been more clear - "the possession of installation media that obviated the need for remote authentication/activation" - it's just that posession of the physical install media used to guarantee that you could install the software even if the underlying company had ceased to exist decades ago.

Steam's something of an odd man out. Valve has sworn up and down on their mothers' graves that if they ever shut down, they'll deactivate the activation requirements for their own software. The problem with that promise is that the instant the ink dries on the acquistion papers or the filing for bankruptcy, that decision ceases to be theirs to make. Offline mode works pretty well, modulo the bugs/quirks and/or interference by third-party DRM schemes.

As DRM goes, Steam's is among the most user-friendly, and as game distributors, Valve is head-and-shoulders above the competition when it comes to customer service. I'm a satisifed customer, but every time I install a new game, I'm reminded that the day will eventually come when it's no longer playable.

Irony: Knowing the expectations of a licensee of a $60 game ought to be lower than those of a licensee of a $1000 software suite, and yet still feeling more bitterness over the eventual fate of a Half-Life 2 license than a CSx license.
2013-01-15 09:24:41 PM
1 votes:

Mad_Radhu: Twilight Farkle: But if you have physical posession of a readable disc, your rights under that license cannot be unilaterally revoked by the vendor, say, by shutting down the activation server. (What happened last week at a certain large software vendor was wonderful, and I hope it sets a de facto industry precedent as the first generations of online-activation-required software reach EOL, but they were under no obligation to do so.)

There's a lot of people who bought boxed copies of Assassin's Creed 2 who would disagree vehemently with you on that point. For modern software that requires authentication (Photoshop, Windows, Office, etc) having the software on disk makes the activation process for the software no different than if you had just downloaded the install files. Hell, for a lot of software, you can just download the ISO and burn a disk any time you want a new one, so there's absolutely nothing special about having a physical disk.


Even for most of my Steam games, I bought the disk because I live in the country and my internet connection is shiatty.  I just upgraded to a Windows 8 clean install a few days ago, and for shiats and giggles I fired up Steam and attempted to reinstall all my games at once.  260GB of games was going to take a week.

I had all that on a backup hard drive, so I was good.  But if I can get the initial 16GB or whatever out of the way by getting a DVD version of a Steam game I'll do it.

The only game this strategy has failed on was The Witcher 2, which, because of the shiattiest programming known to man, had to download a new 12GB file EVERY FARKING TIME THEY UPDATED THE GAME.  I quit playing it for months while they worked out the kinks.
2013-01-15 08:55:03 PM
1 votes:

Twilight Farkle: But if you have physical posession of a readable disc, your rights under that license cannot be unilaterally revoked by the vendor, say, by shutting down the activation server. (What happened last week at a certain large software vendor was wonderful, and I hope it sets a de facto industry precedent as the first generations of online-activation-required software reach EOL, but they were under no obligation to do so.)


There's a lot of people who bought boxed copies of Assassin's Creed 2 who would disagree vehemently with you on that point. For modern software that requires authentication (Photoshop, Windows, Office, etc) having the software on disk makes the activation process for the software no different than if you had just downloaded the install files. Hell, for a lot of software, you can just download the ISO and burn a disk any time you want a new one, so there's absolutely nothing special about having a physical disk.
2013-01-15 08:28:02 PM
1 votes:

seanpg71: styckx: Why are people making ROMs for a closed source OS? How much improvement can you possibly do without any source code?

I read that error as the boot loader not finding the OS code, so they're probably not trying to mess with Windows Phone 8, so much as trying to boot some other OS on the hardware.


The Windows Phone 8 handsets are similar to a Galaxy S3 under the hood, so I've been wondering why it took this long for someone to try to put Android on them. The OS has SecureBoot to try to stop such shenanigans, but those kinds of security measures have rarely stopped anyone in the past.
2013-01-15 07:54:06 PM
1 votes:

rufus-t-firefly: I worked in a call center many years ago. I've never talked crap about unskilled computer users - everyone has to learn - but sometimes...

My favorite was a guy who called and, when I asked him what brand of computer he had, he said it was a "Compa-Q." Pronouncing the "Q" as...well, "Q."

His problem? He had put a 3.5" disk in the CD tray and the tray was stuck.


The mispronounciation of the name isn't out of the ballpark, as Compaq's logo is, in various forms, a giant "Q".
passion.compaq.free.fr
It's a reasonable mistake to make, really, especially if you're using the same symbol in the name to represent the letter "Q".
2013-01-15 06:06:03 PM
1 votes:

TheAlmightyOS: hate to break it to you, but even if you have a particular copy of a software on a disk you do not "own" that software. What you bought is a Software License. The medium does not change this

/pet peeve of mine


Sorry to have hit your pet peeve. I DO realize I have bought a software license. When I retire an old computer and upgrade to a new machine I like to have the program disks. I dislike having to go online and explain what I am doing and justify why I should be allowed to load and run a program I have paid for (the license!) on my new machine. It's getting harder to do with all the protections companies have been putting in place. I understand why the companies are doing it, but it wastes my time and their time; I'm not making copies to sell or give away.
I also like to have the disks if a program gets corrupted and needs wiping and reloading. Download speeds can be frustratingly slow when it comes to large programs. Ain't nobody got time for that.
2013-01-15 05:29:15 PM
1 votes:
I worked in a call center many years ago. I've never talked crap about unskilled computer users - everyone has to learn - but sometimes...

My favorite was a guy who called and, when I asked him what brand of computer he had, he said it was a "Compa-Q." Pronouncing the "Q" as...well, "Q."

His problem? He had put a 3.5" disk in the CD tray and the tray was stuck.
2013-01-15 04:53:20 PM
1 votes:

Harvey Manfrenjensenjen: it won't be long when the only common ports you'll see are USB (and Thunderbolt on Macs) and perhaps HDMI. RJ45 and VGA are too thick.


I wouldn't be surprised if it narrowed down to all USB3 and mDP. HDMI is serviceable, but DisplayPort / mini DisplayPort are going into laptops and graphics cards, and handle higher resolutions. Right now the Ethernet jack is the biggest port on a laptop when it comes to height, but unless we switch to fiber (like TOSLINK or something) you can't fully replace the Ethernet jack's function as a hard-line connection.
2013-01-15 04:35:00 PM
1 votes:

Harvey Manfrenjensenjen: We ditched parallel and 9-pin serial ports in most laptops a decade ago.


Something for which Prolific and FTDI give their most sincere thanks.
2013-01-15 04:06:16 PM
1 votes:

styckx: Why are people making ROMs for a closed source OS? How much improvement can you possibly do without any source code?


Not sure about Windows 8, but back in the WinMo 2003, 2005, and 6 days, you could download the SDK and OS kernel (WinCE at the time) and customize it as you saw fit Basically like Android, though not open-sourced.
2013-01-15 04:04:46 PM
1 votes:

Unoriginal_Username: unlikely: Aren't there manufacturers shipping machines without optical disk readers now? Maybe the new iMac or something?

From the fate of the Floppy, I'm guessing that if Apple's killed them, everyone else is not far behind.

Our director ordered two dell xps laptops. No optical drive or nic


So...with no network interface, how do you work?
2013-01-15 03:56:03 PM
1 votes:

red5ish: Some people like to OWN their software instead of just leasing it.


You realize that even WITH a disc, it's the exact same? But I digress because that is a can of worms.
2013-01-15 03:34:21 PM
1 votes:
This is just the updated EFI equivalent to this generally fear inducing message, correct?


NTLDR is missing
Press Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart
2013-01-15 03:31:40 PM
1 votes:

TNel: So they are making their own ROM and getting this message that nobody outside of that ROM will ever see.... this is news how? Stop screwing with the phones and use them the way they were designed.


Because it's funny.

Lighten up, Francis.

/and no, I, for one, will not stop "screwing around" with my phone.
//make me.
2013-01-15 02:18:36 PM
1 votes:
Aren't there manufacturers shipping machines without optical disk readers now? Maybe the new iMac or something?

From the fate of the Floppy, I'm guessing that if Apple's killed them, everyone else is not far behind.
 
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