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(The Next Web)   Old and busted: Telling you to where to plug in the keyboard before pressing F1. New hotness: I'm sure your sysadmin will be delighted to assist you in figuring out where to insert the Windows installation disc   (thenextweb.com) divider line 62
    More: Fail, Windows, library, BSoD, optical discs, Windows installation, introduction, error messages  
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5866 clicks; posted to Geek » on 15 Jan 2013 at 3:07 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-16 12:04:05 AM

Hacker_X: The funny thing is there is no reason to ditch ethernet ports just to make a machine thinner. 3com solved that problem at least a decade ago. They had PCMCIA ethernet cards with what they called xjack connectors on them.

You juck press on the connector, it pops out, and you plug your ethernet cable straight down into it. When you are done you unplug, press the connector back in and it clicks into place and stays there hidden and protected.

Ruggidize the connector by making it a full metal frame instead of plastic (except for the insulation between pins) and build it into modern laptops/netbooks/tablets and the problem is solved. I don't know if everybody in the industry just forgot about that design or doesn't want to pay a licensing fee or what but there is the solution. Gigabit ethernet connections with a connector that is still only a few millimeters thick.


I remember those; I also remember people always damaging them because they forgot to click them back in before shoving the laptop in their bag and/or having the network cable pulling it at an odd angle and damaging the connector over time. Even a metal frame is going to be so small that it's going to fatigue pretty quickly. At least with those old 3Com cards if it were damaged all you had to do was swap out the card. If they are embedded you'd have to take the whole computer out of commission for a while as it's being worked on. So it's probably easier to just get larger laptops with Ethernet ports for the power users (they're probably still getting those anyway) and issue USB adapters for the few people who might actually need them for their thin laptops when traveling; and if you have a lot of people going between your offices, have each site keep some handy to offer visitors. Tossing them a new adapter to replace the one they lost is a lot easier and cheaper than repair work and lost time for the IT guy and the user. Ultimately, though, since I don't design laptops I'm not the one you need to convince anyway.
 
2013-01-16 01:04:13 AM
Or they could make a thin RJ45 connector advance, preferably with magnetic non-insertion contacts so it can't be bent.
 
2013-01-16 04:24:41 AM
Obligatory:
i.imgur.com
 
2013-01-16 06:09:20 AM

Lsherm: Mad_Radhu: Twilight Farkle: But if you have physical posession of a readable disc, your rights under that license cannot be unilaterally revoked by the vendor, say, by shutting down the activation server. (What happened last week at a certain large software vendor was wonderful, and I hope it sets a de facto industry precedent as the first generations of online-activation-required software reach EOL, but they were under no obligation to do so.)

There's a lot of people who bought boxed copies of Assassin's Creed 2 who would disagree vehemently with you on that point. For modern software that requires authentication (Photoshop, Windows, Office, etc) having the software on disk makes the activation process for the software no different than if you had just downloaded the install files. Hell, for a lot of software, you can just download the ISO and burn a disk any time you want a new one, so there's absolutely nothing special about having a physical disk.

Even for most of my Steam games, I bought the disk because I live in the country and my internet connection is shiatty.  I just upgraded to a Windows 8 clean install a few days ago, and for shiats and giggles I fired up Steam and attempted to reinstall all my games at once.  260GB of games was going to take a week.

I had all that on a backup hard drive, so I was good.  But if I can get the initial 16GB or whatever out of the way by getting a DVD version of a Steam game I'll do it.

The only game this strategy has failed on was The Witcher 2, which, because of the shiattiest programming known to man, had to download a new 12GB file EVERY FARKING TIME THEY UPDATED THE GAME.  I quit playing it for months while they worked out the kinks.


Pro-tip: copy the games out of the steam folder to a different drive. Format, reinstall steam and copy the games back to the correct folder.
 
2013-01-16 08:03:15 AM

TNel: So they are making their own ROM and getting this message that nobody outside of that ROM will ever see.... this is news how? Stop screwing with the phones and use them the way they were designed.


They were designed to make me buy more things
 
2013-01-16 08:30:33 AM

biyaaatci: PirateKing: I got this one the other day:

[i.imgur.com image 217x171]

Good to know.

You were using a version of Dreamweaver by Macromedia the other day?


I know. You'd think a global Fortune 300 company wouldn't cheap out like that, I got UPGRADED a few months ago to Macromedia Dreamweaver 8.
 
2013-01-16 08:39:57 AM
When it comes to Windows OS on Windows phones, Microsoft were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn't stop to think if they should.
 
2013-01-16 11:58:27 AM

DerAppie: Lsherm: Mad_Radhu: Twilight Farkle: But if you have physical posession of a readable disc, your rights under that license cannot be unilaterally revoked by the vendor, say, by shutting down the activation server. (What happened last week at a certain large software vendor was wonderful, and I hope it sets a de facto industry precedent as the first generations of online-activation-required software reach EOL, but they were under no obligation to do so.)

There's a lot of people who bought boxed copies of Assassin's Creed 2 who would disagree vehemently with you on that point. For modern software that requires authentication (Photoshop, Windows, Office, etc) having the software on disk makes the activation process for the software no different than if you had just downloaded the install files. Hell, for a lot of software, you can just download the ISO and burn a disk any time you want a new one, so there's absolutely nothing special about having a physical disk.

Even for most of my Steam games, I bought the disk because I live in the country and my internet connection is shiatty.  I just upgraded to a Windows 8 clean install a few days ago, and for shiats and giggles I fired up Steam and attempted to reinstall all my games at once.  260GB of games was going to take a week.

I had all that on a backup hard drive, so I was good.  But if I can get the initial 16GB or whatever out of the way by getting a DVD version of a Steam game I'll do it.

The only game this strategy has failed on was The Witcher 2, which, because of the shiattiest programming known to man, had to download a new 12GB file EVERY FARKING TIME THEY UPDATED THE GAME.  I quit playing it for months while they worked out the kinks.

Pro-tip: copy the games out of the steam folder to a different drive. Format, reinstall steam and copy the games back to the correct folder.


Don't even need to do that. Steam doesn't care about the registry so you can dump the whole folder to a backup.
 
2013-01-16 03:53:08 PM

DerAppie: Pro-tip: copy the games out of the steam folder to a different drive. Format, reinstall steam and copy the games back to the correct folder.


That's essentially what I did - I just use Acronis for backups.
 
2013-01-16 06:33:26 PM

Harvey Manfrenjensenjen: Hacker_X: The funny thing is there is no reason to ditch ethernet ports just to make a machine thinner. 3com solved that problem at least a decade ago. They had PCMCIA ethernet cards with what they called xjack connectors on them.

You juck press on the connector, it pops out, and you plug your ethernet cable straight down into it. When you are done you unplug, press the connector back in and it clicks into place and stays there hidden and protected.

Ruggidize the connector by making it a full metal frame instead of plastic (except for the insulation between pins) and build it into modern laptops/netbooks/tablets and the problem is solved. I don't know if everybody in the industry just forgot about that design or doesn't want to pay a licensing fee or what but there is the solution. Gigabit ethernet connections with a connector that is still only a few millimeters thick.

I remember those; I also remember people always damaging them because they forgot to click them back in before shoving the laptop in their bag and/or having the network cable pulling it at an odd angle and damaging the connector over time. Even a metal frame is going to be so small that it's going to fatigue pretty quickly. At least with those old 3Com cards if it were damaged all you had to do was swap out the card. If they are embedded you'd have to take the whole computer out of commission for a while as it's being worked on. So it's probably easier to just get larger laptops with Ethernet ports for the power users (they're probably still getting those anyway) and issue USB adapters for the few people who might actually need them for their thin laptops when traveling; and if you have a lot of people going between your offices, have each site keep some handy to offer visitors. Tossing them a new adapter to replace the one they lost is a lot easier and cheaper than repair work and lost time for the IT guy and the user. Ultimately, though, since I don't design laptops I'm not the one you need to c ...


A few thoughts come to mind. One is the old dangle approach where you would have a thin connector you would plug in attached to a cable with the full size ethernet socket at the other end of the short cable. As I recall everybody hated those because they kept losing the cable and every manufacturer used a different connector. That could be remedied these days if everybody would just agree on one pinout. Then they could all make theirs the same and everybody would still buy them from monoprice for one tenth of what the OEMs wanted for a replacement.

A second though is to use the xjack style connectors but instead of making them spring loaded to pop out make it so it is spring loaded to auto retract. You have to pull it out and hold it when plugging in the connector. When you unplug the cable the spring pulls the jack back into the side of the laptop. Slightly (only very slightly) more of a hassle to use when plugging in an ethernet cable but it does make it impossible for the end user to forget to put the jack back in the laptop (or other device) before traveling with it.

Tossing in a new adapter is complicated by the fact that even though we have these wonderful standards for externally accessible pcie slots on laptops more often than not the companies building the laptops aren't including them. IT departments might love easy fixes but OEMs want you to have to send it to them for repair or to just buy a whole new one. There also aren't room for those slots on phones and a lot of tablets.

USB ethernet adapters are functional but they come with their own sets of potential pitfalls. One is that without USB 3 you aren't going to be using gigabit ethernet and even with it you have a lot of extra overhead. The other problem is idiots putting extra physic stress on the adapters by having the cable pulling on it and breaking solder joints. Not as much of a problem as have a piece integrated into a machine be broken but still an issue.

I'm certain we have both seen more than our fair share of unusual abuses committed against poor innocent devices. No solution is going to be perfect but when it comes down to is for the foreseeable future somebody needs to use some sort of standard for thin connectors that let users connect ethernet cables.
 
2013-01-16 06:50:30 PM

Hacker_X: USB ethernet adapters are functional but they come with their own sets of potential pitfalls. One is that without USB 3 you aren't going to be using gigabit ethernet and even with it you have a lot of extra overhead. The other problem is idiots putting extra physic stress on the adapters by having the cable pulling on it and breaking solder joints. Not as much of a problem as have a piece integrated into a machine be broken but still an issue.


Want to troll the hell out of an RF guy? Suggest a magnetically-attached inductively-coupled gigabit+ connector.
 
2013-01-16 09:16:49 PM

ProfessorOhki: Hacker_X: USB ethernet adapters are functional but they come with their own sets of potential pitfalls. One is that without USB 3 you aren't going to be using gigabit ethernet and even with it you have a lot of extra overhead. The other problem is idiots putting extra physic stress on the adapters by having the cable pulling on it and breaking solder joints. Not as much of a problem as have a piece integrated into a machine be broken but still an issue.

Want to troll the hell out of an RF guy? Suggest a magnetically-attached inductively-coupled gigabit+ connector.


Troll? After even reading that I want to strangle you. The problem is that all these new cables are too flimsy and will break before getting the job done. *sigh* Oh for the days of a good centronics cable that you could really beat somebody with when they screwed up.
 
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