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(Boing Boing)   Video explanation of why data caps suck. I would watch it, but I have almost used up my monthly download allowance   (boingboing.net) divider line 36
    More: Obvious, bandwidth cap, Rapture of the Nerds, pirate cinema, adaptations, With a Little Help, ya novels, explanations  
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1239 clicks; posted to Geek » on 15 Jan 2013 at 8:28 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-15 08:29:56 AM  
Without reading this article I assume it involves AT&T???
 
2013-01-15 08:40:19 AM  

Krowdaddy Chixdiggit: Without reading this article I assume it involves AT&T???


(watches video)

Yup.

Are all US ISPs like that?
 
2013-01-15 08:43:24 AM  

Uncle Tractor: Krowdaddy Chixdiggit: Without reading this article I assume it involves AT&T???

(watches video)

Yup.

Are all US ISPs like that?


No they are not, I have never or will never be on a data plan...Flat out BULLSHIATE!
 
2013-01-15 08:48:03 AM  
why would they suck? if you want more, pay for more. having the caps enables the providers to keep the prices lower for everyone. are there really people opposed to this?
 
2013-01-15 08:51:26 AM  
 
2013-01-15 08:55:02 AM  

UNC_Samurai: Or, you could invest in a system where caps are entirely unnecessary.

This obviously doesn't apply to mobile data.


I'm sure the Time Warner and the NC legislature were happy to prevent this from ever happening again.
 
2013-01-15 08:55:04 AM  

proteus_b: why would they suck? if you want more, pay for more. having the caps enables the providers to keep the prices lower for everyone. are there really people opposed to this?


My family had infinate data and paid a low price for it too. Then AT&T, which bought back Bellsouth, decided to force a data cap on us. So tell me, how is that fair?

I have infinite data on my cell but if I upgrade, I am going to loose that. Why is that fair? I paid the most for the plan I have involving data cause I watch movies over my phone a lot while waiting for classes to begin.
 
2013-01-15 08:59:04 AM  

proteus_b: why would they suck? if you want more, pay for more. having the caps enables the providers to keep the prices lower for everyone. are there really people opposed to this?


Yes, people are really opposed with it because it's a complete fabrication. The cost of wholesale bandwidth has been on a non-stop downward spiral since approximately forever. The retail price? Not even a little.
 
2013-01-15 08:59:08 AM  

proteus_b: why would they suck? if you want more, pay for more. having the caps enables the providers to keep the prices lower for everyone. are there really people opposed to this?


Because the tiers that the ISPs and the mobile phone providers create are ridiculously unbalanced. For example, an entry tier might be a useless 200MB for $10, but the next tier would be 1GB for $100. There's no middle ground, and the tiers are grossly overpriced.
 
2013-01-15 08:59:49 AM  

China White Tea: Yes, people are really opposed with to it because it's a complete fabrication. The cost of wholesale bandwidth has been on a non-stop downward spiral since approximately forever. The retail price? Not even a little.


ftfm
 
2013-01-15 09:02:01 AM  
I can understand his concern when it comes to wired internet, but saying that the same argument applies to mobile is complete crap. Of course the idea is to get less people connected at the same time. Instead of taking up channels that can be used for voice or other users, they want you to go to wifi instead.

Also, specifically on ATT's 5gb data cap for mobile hotspots and laptop connect cards those products are not for replacing fixed internet. They are people who need connectivity for business applications/email/etc on the go. If you're not streaming audio/video or doing gaming, they are sufficient. My phone's usage for the last 30 days is ~500mb and I make no attempt to limit my data usage aside from having my apps only update over wifi.
 
2013-01-15 09:04:55 AM  

proteus_b: why would they suck? if you want more, pay for more. having the caps enables the providers to keep the prices lower for everyone. are there really people opposed to this?


Just curious, were you able to type that bit with a straight face?
 
2013-01-15 09:09:58 AM  
Something ironic about an 11-minute video bemoaning data limits.

And if your ISP puts limits in place, don't use them. They are taking you for a sucker.
 
2013-01-15 09:10:51 AM  

proteus_b: why would they suck? if you want more, pay for more. having the caps enables the providers to keep the prices lower for everyone. are there really people opposed to this?


ISPs don't sell you a commodity like water they sell you bandwidth. Keeping with the water analogy it's the size of the pipe that you pay for not what goes through it. My downloading a movie yesterday has no bearing on my neighbor watching netflix today.

The issue is that ISPs sell their capacity multiple times to keep the price low (which makes sense not all users are using their full bandwidth at the same time) but then they decided, 'hey lets play with the ratios a bit to make more profit instead of investing in increasing our capacity'. The bigger issue is that even if we give the ISPs a pass on a distinct lack of capital investment and admit that infrastructure needs to be improved and we need to be willing to control usage for that to happen data caps do nothing at all to address the problem.

Basically data caps are a non-solution to a non-problem that ends up costing the consumers tons of money and does real damage to the economy in the process.
 
2013-01-15 09:15:34 AM  
Yes, we need this video because nobody understands that the ISPs can charge more money if they instate caps and users exceed those caps.

/Idiocracy in action.
 
2013-01-15 09:19:56 AM  
I know that with Comcast, the reason given for a 250G a month cap (the enforcement of which has been suspended for some time now) was because if you had a neighborhood full of people doing high bandwidth things all at once, that would slow down the internet for everyone. It used to be that in the last few weeks of summer vacation and the first few weeks after Christmas, the internet speed at my den was ridiculously slow, as slow as 0.5mbps due to people doing high bandwidth things. Thankfully, Comcast has put a lot of effort into upgrading their systems, slow internet in the evening is no longer an issue and the cap is no longer enforced.
 
2013-01-15 09:21:17 AM  

swahnhennessy: And if your ISP puts limits in place, don't use them. They are taking you for a sucker.


Not everybody has a choice for their ISP. And if they do have a choice, both probably have some data cap in place.
 
2013-01-15 09:21:50 AM  

Egoy3k: proteus_b: why would they suck? if you want more, pay for more. having the caps enables the providers to keep the prices lower for everyone. are there really people opposed to this?

ISPs don't sell you a commodity like water they sell you bandwidth. Keeping with the water analogy it's the size of the pipe that you pay for not what goes through it. My downloading a movie yesterday has no bearing on my neighbor watching netflix today.

The issue is that ISPs sell their capacity multiple times to keep the price low (which makes sense not all users are using their full bandwidth at the same time) but then they decided, 'hey lets play with the ratios a bit to make more profit instead of investing in increasing our capacity'. The bigger issue is that even if we give the ISPs a pass on a distinct lack of capital investment and admit that infrastructure needs to be improved and we need to be willing to control usage for that to happen data caps do nothing at all to address the problem.

Basically data caps are a non-solution to a non-problem that ends up costing the consumers tons of money and does real damage to the economy in the process.


Your point being? That is the american business model in action.
 
2013-01-15 09:26:57 AM  

moothemagiccow: UNC_Samurai: Or, you could invest in a system where caps are entirely unnecessary.

This obviously doesn't apply to mobile data.

I'm sure the Time Warner and the NC legislature were happy to prevent this from ever happening again.


boingboing.net
Oh, they did so in fine fashion.

I gotta plug this report as much as I can. I have a good friend who co-authored the report using his doctoral dissertation on municipal broadband as the basis.

/seriously, I pay $35/month for 10/10 service and when I call tech support they're five minutes away if they need to send someone out
 
2013-01-15 09:38:43 AM  

UNC_Samurai: Oh, they did so in fine fashion.


I wonder whether it would be technically possible to build an alternate internet where every user had their own wireless node, and the data went from node to node without any central anything. Might not work outside areas with many users, though.
 
2013-01-15 09:41:35 AM  

Faps_in_the_kitchen: swahnhennessy: And if your ISP puts limits in place, don't use them. They are taking you for a sucker.

Not everybody has a choice for their ISP. And if they do have a choice, both probably have some data cap in place.


Yeah I have one choice for cable internet in Louisville, and it just got bought out by Time Warner.
 
2013-01-15 10:01:18 AM  
In Canada, it's even worse; the major ISPs are also the major cable/satellite TV providers, and they're deliberately keeping the bandwidth caps low and charging egregiously for exceeding them with the express purpose of making services like Netflix unappealing. It's so bad that Netflix sued them over it for conflict of interest; they were trying to get you to spend $5 for a pay-per-view stream through your cable/satellite TV rather than stream the same thing through Netflix, by ensuring that if you were at your cap, the bandwidth you'd pay for the movie would cost you ~$10 in overages.

The whole system up here is broken.
 
2013-01-15 10:05:13 AM  

Faps_in_the_kitchen: swahnhennessy: And if your ISP puts limits in place, don't use them. They are taking you for a sucker.

Not everybody has a choice for their ISP. And if they do have a choice, both probably have some data cap in place.


THIS!

The worse situation I ever had was when I was in an apartment complex that had signed a sweetheart deal with some crappy, local ISP. They literally wouldn't allow you to get broadband (they wouldn't allow cable hookups in order to force you to use Dish... another sweetheart deal) and the only other option I had was a satellite service that was even worse. 

Long story short, one day the ISP closed its doors without bothering to inform anyone and the entire complex was without any internet for a full week and a half.
 
2013-01-15 10:35:37 AM  
Data caps on cell phones are the worst. They pump out this $500 phones that are built to stream everything possible 24/7 and you get no data to do shiat with without paying out your asshole.
 
2013-01-15 11:25:13 AM  
Try living in a rural area.....
 
2013-01-15 12:02:55 PM  

Uncle Tractor: Krowdaddy Chixdiggit: Without reading this article I assume it involves AT&T???

(watches video)

Yup.

Are all US ISPs like that?


No overages here--they'll just terminate your service if you go over too often.

Krowdaddy Chixdiggit: No they are not, I have never or will never be on a data plan...Flat out BULLSHIATE!


So you don't have a broadband connection?

Cloudchaser Sakonige the Red Wolf: I know that with Comcast, the reason given for a 250G a month cap (the enforcement of which has been suspended for some time now) was because if you had a neighborhood full of people doing high bandwidth things all at once, that would slow down the internet for everyone. It used to be that in the last few weeks of summer vacation and the first few weeks after Christmas, the internet speed at my den was ridiculously slow, as slow as 0.5mbps due to people doing high bandwidth things. Thankfully, Comcast has put a lot of effort into upgrading their systems, slow internet in the evening is no longer an issue and the cap is no longer enforced.


Yup, which is why he's wrong in his article. He's right that the protocol shares the capacity reasonably but the result is everyone's speed drops when that happens. The ISPs are keeping the speed up by cutting usage rather than by increasing capacity.

I do think things like Hulu and Netflix are a big part of it, though.
 
2013-01-15 12:50:19 PM  

richlw: StoPPeRmobile: Suck my internet peen without a jimmy.

[www.speedtest.net image 300x135]

One upped

[www.speedtest.net image 300x135]

Wireless even, not even direct, normally runs 40-45 mbps


Hardly. Look at that paltry upload rate. Way below my standards. Would not hit.
 
2013-01-15 01:01:41 PM  

Thorak: In Canada, it's even worse; the major ISPs are also the major cable/satellite TV providers, and they're deliberately keeping the bandwidth caps low and charging egregiously for exceeding them with the express purpose of making services like Netflix unappealing. It's so bad that Netflix sued them over it for conflict of interest; they were trying to get you to spend $5 for a pay-per-view stream through your cable/satellite TV rather than stream the same thing through Netflix, by ensuring that if you were at your cap, the bandwidth you'd pay for the movie would cost you ~$10 in overages.

The whole system up here is broken.


I don't think broken is the right terminology.

I'm in Calgary with 100mbps service, theoretically capped.  I have an air video server with a huge library of hi def video. I have 3 tuners with slingboxes attached.  between them, I probably am serving 6 streams at any given time to friends and family.  And I've got a handful of torrents going.   By all meaningful measurement, I am a power user. And I've yet to have any slowdown or cap issues.
 
2013-01-15 01:14:05 PM  
hey idiots it is not capped, you just pay more for more service
 
2013-01-15 06:13:09 PM  
I see the Boing Boing "we deserve unlimited free Internet brigade" is out in force again.
 
2013-01-16 02:50:07 AM  

Loren: I do think things like Hulu and Netflix are a big part of it, though.


That and games such as Call Of Duty that require a lot of bandwidth.
 
2013-01-16 03:27:43 AM  

narkor: I see the Boing Boing "we deserve unlimited free Internet brigade" is out in force again.


We definitely deserve way better internet service than we are getting. I might even be willing to pay more for it if it were available, but it is not even available. My choice is either 12M/1M and 250GB cap for $53/mo, or 768k/400k and 5GB cap for $80/mo. Or dialup.
 
2013-01-16 04:32:21 AM  

swahnhennessy: Something ironic about an 11-minute video bemoaning data limits.


The movement of the web from text to video is disconcerting. Especially if I look up a "tutorial" and discover it's a video. That's the worst.
 
2013-01-16 04:52:48 AM  

narkor: I see the Boing Boing "we deserve unlimited free Internet brigade" is out in force again.


We deserve not to have to worry about data caps like it's 1995 and you only have 2 AOL hours left in the second week of the month. That's what we want. We deserve not to be relegated to 1GB per month and punished when we cross the threshold to 1.^AGB. And we are punished.

No other utility does this. You used 51 gallons of water instead of your requisite 50 gallons! Rather than just charge you for 51, we're going to charge you for 75 and add a penalty fee for you thinking so much of yourself! So what if you had guests, fark you! You should have planned ahead and chosen the higher tier!

Data caps are in place because they're more profitable and there's no competition.
 
2013-01-16 04:53:29 AM  
that's supposed to say 1 point oh oh oh oh 1 but fark ate it. Let's settle for 1.001
 
2013-01-16 06:21:55 AM  
Yay for the government who banned data caps. Suck it everyone else.
 
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