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(Stuff.co.nz)   Health officials: You can drink your own homebrew, but we may be prying it out of your cold, dead hands   (stuff.co.nz) divider line 84
    More: Scary, methanol, liver failure, power pole, drinks  
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3941 clicks; posted to Geek » on 15 Jan 2013 at 10:06 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-15 09:46:05 AM  
This just in! Home distilled spirits may contain Methanol.
 
2013-01-15 09:51:24 AM  
I'm trying my hand at home-brewing beer. Got some equipment for Christmas. First batch should be ready in a couple weeks.

Not expecting my first attempt to be any good, but I hope I at least don't kill myself.
 
2013-01-15 09:55:03 AM  

Doc Daneeka: I'm trying my hand at home-brewing beer. Got some equipment for Christmas. First batch should be ready in a couple weeks.

Not expecting my first attempt to be any good, but I hope I at least don't kill myself.


Beer is safe... as long as your equipment is clean it'll be fine. Just don't distill it without proper instruction.

Welcome to the addiction! :D
 
2013-01-15 09:55:14 AM  

Doc Daneeka: Not expecting my first attempt to be any good, but I hope I at least don't kill myself.


It's not usually home brewed beer that sickens or kills people, it's home distilled spirits. A lot of people don't realize how potent they are.
 
2013-01-15 10:09:55 AM  
"The trouble with the spirits is you don't know the alcohol content."

Farking hydrometers. How do they work?
 
2013-01-15 10:15:51 AM  

PacManDreaming: Doc Daneeka: Not expecting my first attempt to be any good, but I hope I at least don't kill myself.

It's not usually home brewed beer that sickens or kills people, it's home distilled spirits. A lot of people don't realize how potent they are.


Exactly.

Dad has been looking for a hobby now that he is retired and is researching the legal ins and outs of distilling spirits for a fuel additive for his gas powered farm equipment. A simple reflux still can produce a 130-140 proof end product, and subsequent stripping runs can drive that almost to the 185+ mark.
 
2013-01-15 10:17:25 AM  
Headline submitter is a dipshiat. Home BREW and Home DISTILL, aka MOONSHINE, are entirely different stories. Your headline is bad and you should feel bad.
 
2013-01-15 10:18:35 AM  

Doc Daneeka: I'm trying my hand at home-brewing beer. Got some equipment for Christmas. First batch should be ready in a couple weeks.

Not expecting my first attempt to be any good, but I hope I at least don't kill myself.


They are talking about distillation not brewing. More or less moonshine. There are a ton of ways to mess up distillation, brewing you can make something that really sucks and you wont want to drink it, but its quite hard to make yourself sick (other than over indulgence of a good batch) let alone kill you.
 
2013-01-15 10:20:08 AM  

abhorrent1: "The trouble with the spirits is you don't know the alcohol content."

Farking hydrometers. How do they work?


This. As a homebrewer, I feel I can confidently assert that anybody with the knowledge to make high proof alcohol is going to be aware of roughly how high proof it is. The process is not quite as simple as a layperson might think.

That said, I'll echo the sentiment from TFA: It's not the quality that will kill you, it's the quantity. This doesn't change when you switch to name-brand.
 
2013-01-15 10:20:40 AM  
Although illlegal in the US and i would never do it for that reason, frost distilled Apple Jack has always sounded interesting to me.

/Still experimenting with many different meads and ciders
 
2013-01-15 10:27:58 AM  
Isn't home distillation already illegal? Hence the name "moonshine"?
 
2013-01-15 10:28:50 AM  

Tr0mBoNe: Doc Daneeka: I'm trying my hand at home-brewing beer. Got some equipment for Christmas. First batch should be ready in a couple weeks.

Not expecting my first attempt to be any good, but I hope I at least don't kill myself.

Beer is safe... as long as your equipment is clean it'll be fine. Just don't distill it without proper instruction.

Welcome to the addiction! :D


What did you brew Doc? I had a batch of puck drop porter ready for Columbus Day but farking Bergman ruined my plans. It's long gone as 5 gallons doesn't last long around my friends and family. And Tr0mb0ne is right, your first batch will be good enough to hook you in for good.
 
2013-01-15 10:30:53 AM  

Anderson's Pooper: Tr0mBoNe: Doc Daneeka: I'm trying my hand at home-brewing beer. Got some equipment for Christmas. First batch should be ready in a couple weeks.

Not expecting my first attempt to be any good, but I hope I at least don't kill myself.

Beer is safe... as long as your equipment is clean it'll be fine. Just don't distill it without proper instruction.

Welcome to the addiction! :D

What did you brew Doc? I had a batch of puck drop porter ready for Columbus Day but farking Bergman ruined my plans. It's long gone as 5 gallons doesn't last long around my friends and family. And Tr0mb0ne is right, your first batch will be good enough to hook you in for good.


First attempt is an IPA. Only trying a 1 gallon batch for starters. We'll see how it turns out.
 
2013-01-15 10:33:19 AM  

abhorrent1: "The trouble with the spirits is you don't know the alcohol content."

Farking hydrometers. How do they work?


The danger with moonshine isn't the quantity but the type of alcohol.
 
2013-01-15 10:36:17 AM  
Warm dead hands would just be creepy.
 
2013-01-15 10:36:53 AM  

hungryhungryhorus: abhorrent1: "The trouble with the spirits is you don't know the alcohol content."

Farking hydrometers. How do they work?

This. As a homebrewer, I feel I can confidently assert that anybody with the knowledge to make high proof alcohol is going to be aware of roughly how high proof it is. The process is not quite as simple as a layperson might think.

That said, I'll echo the sentiment from TFA: It's not the quality that will kill you, it's the quantity. This doesn't change when you switch to name-brand.


Disagree.

It's quite easy to attempt to make high proof alcohol and nearly kill yourself, especially if you are bad at math and don't understand that the boiling point of methanol/ethanol/water changes relative to sea level (and have no artifical way of maintaining pressure in your still).
 
2013-01-15 10:38:59 AM  

Doc Daneeka: Anderson's Pooper: Tr0mBoNe: Doc Daneeka: I'm trying my hand at home-brewing beer. Got some equipment for Christmas. First batch should be ready in a couple weeks.

Not expecting my first attempt to be any good, but I hope I at least don't kill myself.

Beer is safe... as long as your equipment is clean it'll be fine. Just don't distill it without proper instruction.

Welcome to the addiction! :D

What did you brew Doc? I had a batch of puck drop porter ready for Columbus Day but farking Bergman ruined my plans. It's long gone as 5 gallons doesn't last long around my friends and family. And Tr0mb0ne is right, your first batch will be good enough to hook you in for good.

First attempt is an IPA. Only trying a 1 gallon batch for starters. We'll see how it turns out.


You'll be on 5 gallon batches in no time.

/American Pale Ale in primary
//Belgian Quadrupel in secondary
///Honey Ale and Winter Warmer on tap
 
2013-01-15 10:43:14 AM  

hungryhungryhorus: abhorrent1: "The trouble with the spirits is you don't know the alcohol content."

Farking hydrometers. How do they work?

This. As a homebrewer, I feel I can confidently assert that anybody with the knowledge to make high proof alcohol is going to be aware of roughly how high proof it is. The process is not quite as simple as a layperson might think.


That said, you've got to trust the maker to put in the work to learn the alcohol content, to actually do it correctly, and to accurately convey that to the buyer. Not all makers will do that, and not just due to malice.

That said, I'll echo the sentiment from TFA: It's not the quality that will kill you, it's the quantity. This doesn't change when you switch to name-brand.

The thing is, quality has a major effect on quantity, and although this doesn't change when you switch to name-brand either, what does change is that you can get a better idea of both.
 
2013-01-15 10:45:44 AM  

pizen: abhorrent1: "The trouble with the spirits is you don't know the alcohol content."

Farking hydrometers. How do they work?

The danger with moonshine isn't the quantity but the type of alcohol.


yeah, this. basically. there are some special steps you should take because the process often makes the methanol, which is deadly even in small doses.
 
2013-01-15 10:50:37 AM  
Since there are a bunch of homebrewers here, let me ask a question.

How can you tell when the beer is ready for bottling? Should I wait until there is no more foam on the surface of the beer?
 
2013-01-15 10:51:06 AM  

Doc Daneeka: I'm trying my hand at home-brewing beer. Got some equipment for Christmas. First batch should be ready in a couple weeks.

Not expecting my first attempt to be any good, but I hope I at least don't kill myself.


A friend of mine has been home brewing pretty much forever (his family has been into it since I've known him). Finally went over to his place in November and had him teach me the ins and outs and we made 3 different beer. A dark ale, medium draft, and a light lager. It was a good time, and they all turned out drinkable. The ale and draft were actually pretty good. Lager was a little too carbonated and bitter, but then I feel that way about commercial lagers as well.
 
2013-01-15 10:51:22 AM  

Doc Daneeka: Since there are a bunch of homebrewers here, let me ask a question.

How can you tell when the beer is ready for bottling? Should I wait until there is no more foam on the surface of the beer?


www.homebrewtalk.com
 
2013-01-15 10:54:25 AM  

pute kisses like a man: pizen: abhorrent1: "The trouble with the spirits is you don't know the alcohol content."

Farking hydrometers. How do they work?

The danger with moonshine isn't the quantity but the type of alcohol.

yeah, this. basically. there are some special steps you should take because the process often makes the methanol, which is deadly even in small doses.


I have a bit of a guilty pleasure in watching Moonshiners and I know that methanol is poisonous but how in the world do you end up with it in your product? I know the yeast do their thing making carbon dioxide and ethanol in the mash (probably with trace amounts of MeOH) but how do you ever end up with enough to kill you short of holding the distillation temperature at methanol Bp instead of ethanol and collecting the fraction?
 
2013-01-15 10:55:04 AM  
I made booze in college.  Hacked together a pot still and used a sugar-yeast fermentation recipe from online.  Didn't go blind, didn't die, did get drunk.  It's just too much of a pain to do.
 
2013-01-15 11:00:47 AM  
I have a failed Imperial IPA that might be deadly. I feel bad dumping it down the drain, but I feel worse trying to drink it. I guess I should see if it works for stripping paint.
 
2013-01-15 11:01:46 AM  

Doc Daneeka: Anderson's Pooper: Tr0mBoNe: Doc Daneeka: I'm trying my hand at home-brewing beer. Got some equipment for Christmas. First batch should be ready in a couple weeks.

Not expecting my first attempt to be any good, but I hope I at least don't kill myself.

Beer is safe... as long as your equipment is clean it'll be fine. Just don't distill it without proper instruction.

Welcome to the addiction! :D

What did you brew Doc? I had a batch of puck drop porter ready for Columbus Day but farking Bergman ruined my plans. It's long gone as 5 gallons doesn't last long around my friends and family. And Tr0mb0ne is right, your first batch will be good enough to hook you in for good.

First attempt is an IPA. Only trying a 1 gallon batch for starters. We'll see how it turns out.



I've always found that IPAs can be taken up to the next level if you can get ahold of fresh or fresh frozen hops and dry hop it in secondary. Easy to do, doesn't add a ton in terms of cost, and adds a lot of flavor.
 
2013-01-15 11:02:10 AM  

Fizpez: pute kisses like a man: pizen: abhorrent1: "The trouble with the spirits is you don't know the alcohol content."

Farking hydrometers. How do they work?

The danger with moonshine isn't the quantity but the type of alcohol.

yeah, this. basically. there are some special steps you should take because the process often makes the methanol, which is deadly even in small doses.

I have a bit of a guilty pleasure in watching Moonshiners and I know that methanol is poisonous but how in the world do you end up with it in your product? I know the yeast do their thing making carbon dioxide and ethanol in the mash (probably with trace amounts of MeOH) but how do you ever end up with enough to kill you short of holding the distillation temperature at methanol Bp instead of ethanol and collecting the fraction?


"Methanol is a toxic chemical sometimes added to drinks to make them more alcoholic. "
 
2013-01-15 11:03:46 AM  

Doc Daneeka: Since there are a bunch of homebrewers here, let me ask a question.

How can you tell when the beer is ready for bottling? Should I wait until there is no more foam on the surface of the beer?


The most accurate method would be to check gravity and bottle when it hits the target the recipe calls for. I generally don't bother with that. I let primary fermentation run until it's done, and then usually let it spend a week or two in secondary to mature and allow particulates to fall out prior to bottling.
 
2013-01-15 11:06:16 AM  

StoPPeRmobile: Fizpez: pute kisses like a man: pizen: abhorrent1: "The trouble with the spirits is you don't know the alcohol content."

Farking hydrometers. How do they work?

The danger with moonshine isn't the quantity but the type of alcohol.

yeah, this. basically. there are some special steps you should take because the process often makes the methanol, which is deadly even in small doses.

I have a bit of a guilty pleasure in watching Moonshiners and I know that methanol is poisonous but how in the world do you end up with it in your product? I know the yeast do their thing making carbon dioxide and ethanol in the mash (probably with trace amounts of MeOH) but how do you ever end up with enough to kill you short of holding the distillation temperature at methanol Bp instead of ethanol and collecting the fraction?

"Methanol is a toxic chemical sometimes added to drinks to make them more alcoholic. "


That's not really the answer - it has to come from somehwere if making distilled alcohol (and not deliberately poisoning yourself) is potentially dangerous - I did a wee bit of googling and found Methanol can result from the fermentation of certain fruits and I believe wood products.
 
2013-01-15 11:09:59 AM  

StoPPeRmobile: Fizpez: pute kisses like a man: pizen: abhorrent1: "The trouble with the spirits is you don't know the alcohol content."

Farking hydrometers. How do they work?

The danger with moonshine isn't the quantity but the type of alcohol.

yeah, this. basically. there are some special steps you should take because the process often makes the methanol, which is deadly even in small doses.

I have a bit of a guilty pleasure in watching Moonshiners and I know that methanol is poisonous but how in the world do you end up with it in your product? I know the yeast do their thing making carbon dioxide and ethanol in the mash (probably with trace amounts of MeOH) but how do you ever end up with enough to kill you short of holding the distillation temperature at methanol Bp instead of ethanol and collecting the fraction?

"Methanol is a toxic chemical sometimes added to drinks to make them more alcoholic. "


I've never heard of methanol being added to drinks. I guess it's possible. But 20 liters of mash will generate roughly 50 milliliters of methanol. It comes out of the still first since methanol's boiling point is lower than ethanol's boiling point, and is thus rather highly concentrated. 10 milliliters can cause blindness, and 30 milliliters can cause death.
 
2013-01-15 11:10:14 AM  

Doc Daneeka: I'm trying my hand at home-brewing beer. Got some equipment for Christmas. First batch should be ready in a couple weeks.

Not expecting my first attempt to be any good, but I hope I at least don't kill myself.


The first batch we made was one of the best. The bummer of it is, you can never get the exact same result in a homebrew setting. Too many variables. So if you like a batch, enjoy it. When it's gone, it's gone.

Also, follow directions and sterilize your stuff and you won't die. Beer isn't rocket surgery. TFA is talking about homemade hooch, which is illegal in the US.
 
2013-01-15 11:15:39 AM  

mojotele: I've never heard of methanol being added to drinks.


I can't remember which country, but we had a thread a few months ago about a country that had suspended all liquor sales because counterfit brands were showing up with methanol in them and killing people.
 
2013-01-15 11:15:53 AM  

mojotele: StoPPeRmobile: Fizpez: pute kisses like a man: pizen: abhorrent1: "The trouble with the spirits is you don't know the alcohol content."

Farking hydrometers. How do they work?

The danger with moonshine isn't the quantity but the type of alcohol.

yeah, this. basically. there are some special steps you should take because the process often makes the methanol, which is deadly even in small doses.

I have a bit of a guilty pleasure in watching Moonshiners and I know that methanol is poisonous but how in the world do you end up with it in your product? I know the yeast do their thing making carbon dioxide and ethanol in the mash (probably with trace amounts of MeOH) but how do you ever end up with enough to kill you short of holding the distillation temperature at methanol Bp instead of ethanol and collecting the fraction?

"Methanol is a toxic chemical sometimes added to drinks to make them more alcoholic. "

I've never heard of methanol being added to drinks. I guess it's possible. But 20 liters of mash will generate roughly 50 milliliters of methanol. It comes out of the still first since methanol's boiling point is lower than ethanol's boiling point, and is thus rather highly concentrated. 10 milliliters can cause blindness, and 30 milliliters can cause death.


My mistake (hearing stories about prohibition moonshiners) was that I assumed they did something wrong in the distillation process resulting in excess methanol and thus blind/dead users. Apparently it was mostly because the scummy bastards actually added it to final product to increase profits.

From what I've just read on my link above basically indicates if you use grain mashes and avoid drinking the first few ounces of liquid to exit the still (being more concentrated in methanol because of its lower bp) you bascially can't screw up distilling enough to kill yourself with methanol. Of course there are a bunch of other ways to kill yourself distilling (exploding ethanol vapors) but at least inadvertently poisoning yourself isnt one of them.
 
2013-01-15 11:15:57 AM  

mojotele: It comes out of the still first since methanol's boiling point is lower than ethanol's boiling point,


It's in the "heads" and you keep dumping that stuff until the horrible smell goes away.  When you hit the "tails", the distillate starts to smell horrible again and you know your run is done.
 
2013-01-15 11:16:33 AM  
You can't die from drinking homebrew beer period (barring things like adding rat poison to it). Even if you don't sanitize properly, the worst you'll get is a lactobacillus, acetobacter, or mold infection. Sure, the beer won't taste/look great, but drinking it won't hurt you.
 
2013-01-15 11:18:48 AM  
Thanks for filling me in on adding methanol to the drinks, guys. I never read those articles. That is truly disgusting.
 
2013-01-15 11:27:35 AM  

logggur: Isn't home distillation already illegal? Hence the name "moonshine"?


Depends on the state. Texas is supposedly legal to make your own, for personal use only, but never to sell.

Selling it brings in the FDA or the ATF guys, and is more a tax related concern (no sales tax) than anything else.

Also, you know, death and blindness related to unregulated stills.
 
2013-01-15 11:36:31 AM  

namegoeshere: The bummer of it is, you can never get the exact same result in a homebrew setting. Too many variables. So if you like a batch, enjoy it. When it's gone, it's gone.




Baloney.
Just take notes on everything, and for goodness sakes, use a timer, a decent thermometer, and a hydrometer.
Be sure and use the same quality of water.
 
2013-01-15 11:48:46 AM  

calm like a bomb: Doc Daneeka: Since there are a bunch of homebrewers here, let me ask a question.

How can you tell when the beer is ready for bottling? Should I wait until there is no more foam on the surface of the beer?

The most accurate method would be to check gravity and bottle when it hits the target the recipe calls for. I generally don't bother with that. I let primary fermentation run until it's done, and then usually let it spend a week or two in secondary to mature and allow particulates to fall out prior to bottling.


Or if he doesn't have a secondary, just let it sit in the primary for two weeks.  That's what I tend to do.

/I need to get a secondary.
 
2013-01-15 11:52:02 AM  
Hot damn.... Filling up my Homebrewers favorites list didn't realize there were so many of us on here.

I'll 2nd the link to HomeBrewTalk

/Drinking Strawberry Rhubarb Pie Wheat
//Planned Peanut Butter Cup Stout v2.0
///Hobby is insanely addicting
 
2013-01-15 11:52:55 AM  

calm like a bomb: Doc Daneeka: Anderson's Pooper: Tr0mBoNe: Doc Daneeka: I'm trying my hand at home-brewing beer. Got some equipment for Christmas. First batch should be ready in a couple weeks.

Not expecting my first attempt to be any good, but I hope I at least don't kill myself.

Beer is safe... as long as your equipment is clean it'll be fine. Just don't distill it without proper instruction.

Welcome to the addiction! :D

What did you brew Doc? I had a batch of puck drop porter ready for Columbus Day but farking Bergman ruined my plans. It's long gone as 5 gallons doesn't last long around my friends and family. And Tr0mb0ne is right, your first batch will be good enough to hook you in for good.

First attempt is an IPA. Only trying a 1 gallon batch for starters. We'll see how it turns out.


I've always found that IPAs can be taken up to the next level if you can get ahold of fresh or fresh frozen hops and dry hop it in secondary. Easy to do, doesn't add a ton in terms of cost, and adds a lot of flavor.


Stop that sexy talk. It's not even noon here.
 
2013-01-15 11:55:22 AM  

Lexx: Headline submitter is a dipshiat. Home BREW and Home DISTILL, aka MOONSHINE, are entirely different stories. Your headline is bad and you should feel bad.


That.
 
2013-01-15 11:58:02 AM  

neritz: calm like a bomb: Doc Daneeka: Since there are a bunch of homebrewers here, let me ask a question.

How can you tell when the beer is ready for bottling? Should I wait until there is no more foam on the surface of the beer?

The most accurate method would be to check gravity and bottle when it hits the target the recipe calls for. I generally don't bother with that. I let primary fermentation run until it's done, and then usually let it spend a week or two in secondary to mature and allow particulates to fall out prior to bottling.

Or if he doesn't have a secondary, just let it sit in the primary for two weeks.  That's what I tend to do.

/I need to get a secondary.


I used to do that as well, but then I bought a second bucket for like $12. And then I bought a Bayou Classic burner. And then I bought a wort chiller. And then I bought a bottle washer. And then I figured I needed another refrigerator. And then since I had the fridge, I figured it was time to buy a kegging setup. What was that definition of addiction again?
 
2013-01-15 11:58:46 AM  

Loki009: Although illlegal in the US and i would never do it for that reason, frost distilled Apple Jack has always sounded interesting to me.

/Still experimenting with many different meads and ciders


Freeze-concentration isn't considered distillation by the Feds. Even the wack-os at OOCCLF (Oregon Obsessive Compulsive Liquor Control Freaks), haven't banned it. But they cut the sample size at beer fests to 3 oz.
 
2013-01-15 12:00:46 PM  

mojotele: StoPPeRmobile: Fizpez: pute kisses like a man: pizen: abhorrent1: "The trouble with the spirits is you don't know the alcohol content."

Farking hydrometers. How do they work?

The danger with moonshine isn't the quantity but the type of alcohol.

yeah, this. basically. there are some special steps you should take because the process often makes the methanol, which is deadly even in small doses.

I have a bit of a guilty pleasure in watching Moonshiners and I know that methanol is poisonous but how in the world do you end up with it in your product? I know the yeast do their thing making carbon dioxide and ethanol in the mash (probably with trace amounts of MeOH) but how do you ever end up with enough to kill you short of holding the distillation temperature at methanol Bp instead of ethanol and collecting the fraction?

"Methanol is a toxic chemical sometimes added to drinks to make them more alcoholic. "

I've never heard of methanol being added to drinks. I guess it's possible. But 20 liters of mash will generate roughly 50 milliliters of methanol. It comes out of the still first since methanol's boiling point is lower than ethanol's boiling point, and is thus rather highly concentrated. 10 milliliters can cause blindness, and 30 milliliters can cause death.


Do you know what a speak is?
 
2013-01-15 12:01:54 PM  

Fizpez: StoPPeRmobile: Fizpez: pute kisses like a man: pizen: abhorrent1: "The trouble with the spirits is you don't know the alcohol content."

Farking hydrometers. How do they work?

The danger with moonshine isn't the quantity but the type of alcohol.

yeah, this. basically. there are some special steps you should take because the process often makes the methanol, which is deadly even in small doses.

I have a bit of a guilty pleasure in watching Moonshiners and I know that methanol is poisonous but how in the world do you end up with it in your product? I know the yeast do their thing making carbon dioxide and ethanol in the mash (probably with trace amounts of MeOH) but how do you ever end up with enough to kill you short of holding the distillation temperature at methanol Bp instead of ethanol and collecting the fraction?

"Methanol is a toxic chemical sometimes added to drinks to make them more alcoholic. "

That's not really the answer - it has to come from somehwere if making distilled alcohol (and not deliberately poisoning yourself) is potentially dangerous - I did a wee bit of googling and found Methanol can result from the fermentation of certain fruits and I believe wood products.


You are right. I'm just pointing out that the article is all over the place, pointing fingers.
 
2013-01-15 12:03:14 PM  
You are all missing the most important reason why this article is right baout homebrewing being deadly, and I'm not talking about Methanol VS. Ethanol. No, the most obvious reason is that this article is from Australia. And I have it on good authority that EVERYTHING IN AUSTRALIA WILL KILL YOU. OFTEN PAINFULLY.

/also, 2nd to the guy that recommended homebrewtalk.com
//EdWort's Apfelwein is awesome too
 
2013-01-15 12:05:59 PM  

abhorrent1: "The trouble with the spirits is you don't know the alcohol content."

Farking hydrometers. How do they work?


And they are $10 FFS!
 
2013-01-15 12:07:46 PM  

logggur: Isn't home distillation already illegal? Hence the name "moonshine"?


Not in New Zealand, to where this article is referring
 
2013-01-15 12:10:02 PM  

natazha: Loki009: Although illlegal in the US and i would never do it for that reason, frost distilled Apple Jack has always sounded interesting to me.

/Still experimenting with many different meads and ciders

Freeze-concentration isn't considered distillation by the Feds.


Seriously? If true, that's some very good news to me.
 
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