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(Yahoo)   Scientists say the Milky Way may be half as big as previously thought. They're still charging the same price for it, I bet   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 60
    More: Interesting, Milky Way Galaxy, radial velocities, galactic center, Mike Wall, dark matter, light-years, ESO, half  
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2233 clicks; posted to Geek » on 14 Jan 2013 at 5:50 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-14 10:09:39 PM  
Please bear in mind, what these guys are talking about is not any part of the galaxy that we could possibly care about -- they really mean the dark matter envelope is less massive than estimated
 
2013-01-14 10:33:29 PM  
Bondith:
Son of Thunder: "If we infer the properties of the stars that we think are reasonable, then we find the mass of the Milky Way could be half as massive as we currently believe," added Deason

But what if some of the stars are unreasonable?

Demanding top billing, a cut of the gross, flowers in their dressing room, sort of thing?

doglover: GeneralJim: doglover: machoprogrammer: Stars in the far outer reaches of the Milky Way, between 260,000 and 490,000 light-years from the galactic center, are cruising around surprisingly slowly, researchers found. Galactic mass and star velocities are linked, so the results could have big implications.

I thought the galaxy was only 100,000 light years across? How does that work?

Wait, really?

(´・_・`)

I fear for kids today.

Yeah... But, outside of the structure of the galaxy is a group of stars in a "halo," held to the Milky Way by gravity, but NOT part of the structure. Thus:

[www.astrobio.net image 400x399]


I was more worried that he couldn't tell radius and diameter apart.

You seem to have missed that, too.

A 100,000 ly diameter would mean a 50,000 ly radius, which is an order of magnitude smaller than the numbers quoted in the article, so his point stands.

You seem to have missed that.

What *I* don't get is how I'm supposed to have missed the difference between radius and diameter. I made no reference to either, and mentioned no numbers. "So, I see you don't know the difference between a bottle-nosed dolphin and a fish" would have made EXACTLY the same amount of sense.
 
2013-01-14 10:41:37 PM  

COMALite J: According to currently en vogue theory, Earth's own Moon is a complete fluke, having been knocked from the Earth itself by a massive collision early on, leaving an enormous crater in the Earth that we now call the Pacific Ocean.



The Moon got knocked out well before the Earth stopped cooling down (and said hit added a goodly amount of mass to the Earth, so the idea that a feature that reaches from pole to pole would be a crater for a celestial body that wouldn't be that big until after the hit is absurd) - and because of plate tectonics, the world's continents and oceans have been radically altered several times over. The Pacific is no more an impact crater than my big toe is.
 
2013-01-14 10:51:41 PM  
Forget the Milky Way. What in the hell happened to the Whatchamacallit?

It used to be a light, crunchy, caramel-topped dream in chocolate. Now, it's a friggin' stale brick with a layer of caramel on it so thin you pretty much have to take their word that it still even has caramel, covered in a kind of brown wax made from cocoa chaff & PGPR.

Candy's expensive enough without making it out of used candle wax and floor sweepings.
 
2013-01-15 03:31:11 AM  

phalamir: COMALite J: According to currently en vogue theory, Earth's own Moon is a complete fluke, having been knocked from the Earth itself by a massive collision early on, leaving an enormous crater in the Earth that we now call the Pacific Ocean.


The Moon got knocked out well before the Earth stopped cooling down (and said hit added a goodly amount of mass to the Earth, so the idea that a feature that reaches from pole to pole would be a crater for a celestial body that wouldn't be that big until after the hit is absurd) - and because of plate tectonics, the world's continents and oceans have been radically altered several times over. The Pacific is no more an impact crater than my big toe is.


Headline: astronomers speculate Internet denizen's big toe may be impact crater from moon creation impact! Proof of humans living billions of years ago, or cruel digital hoax?
 
2013-01-15 07:09:10 AM  
like I've been saying all along

farking morons with degrees who believe anything their inept use of a calculator tells them
 
2013-01-15 07:53:23 AM  

machoprogrammer: I thought the galaxy was only 100,000 light years across? How does that work?


It's a bit of a regrettable misnomer packaged in a miscommunication complicated by layman misunderstanding. Measurements of distance typically refer to the disk, but this can be very arbitrary because the density of stars more tapers off than abruptly stops. The mass of the galaxy is a better definition of its "size" (as confusing as that is), because giving or taking a couple hundred thousand stars really doesn't change it much. But that's trickier, and still a work in progress.

Getting back to how big the galaxy is "across", galaxies really don't have boundaries at all. You can see the density of stars taper off into what looks like nothing, but there will be a few stragglers way out there, gravitationally bound to the core but not visible if you're looking at the whole disk. The actual gravitational influence of the core (ours, anyway) extends out well over a million light-years; we've found other galaxies orbiting the Milky Way out that far. One could technically argue that these satellite galaxies aren't separate galaxies at all, but actually part of the Milky Way itself.

We have similar problems defining the edge of the solar system. The media has widely reported that Voyager 1 is at the "edge" of the solar system because it's in the heliopause, but that's just the heliopause. The Hill sphere (the distance at which the Sun can keep a satellite) extends out to two light-years, meaning a planet even a full light-year out can be firmly bound to the Sun's gravity, well beyond our ability to detect it (unless it's the size of Jupiter). If you flew by this hypothetical planet, the only way you'd be able to tell it "belongs" to the Sun is by tracking its motion and calculating its orbit. Otherwise it'd look like an ultra-cold planet in the middle of nowhere.
 
2013-01-15 08:38:54 AM  

machoprogrammer: Stars in the far outer reaches of the Milky Way, between 260,000 and 490,000 light-years from the galactic center, are cruising around surprisingly slowly, researchers found. Galactic mass and star velocities are linked, so the results could have big implications.

I thought the galaxy was only 100,000 light years across? How does that work?


Four sentences later...

Deason and her team looked far out into the Milky Way's halo, which extends far beyond the 100,000-light-year-wide disk.

doglover:

ThrobblefootSpectre:

Bondith:


Argue first, RTFA never. Good job guys, you make Fark what it is.
 
2013-01-15 03:02:21 PM  
Seems to me that all the candy bars have shrunk since I was a kid.
 
2013-01-15 10:41:34 PM  

machoprogrammer: Stars in the far outer reaches of the Milky Way, between 260,000 and 490,000 light-years from the galactic center, are cruising around surprisingly slowly, researchers found. Galactic mass and star velocities are linked, so the results could have big implications.

I thought the galaxy was only 100,000 light years across? How does that work?


I forgot what the law is called now... but its because gravity is actually pulling inward in our galaxy, even as the universe expands. When you pull an orbiting body inward, it increases in speed, because it has the same momentum/velocity but in a smaller, tighter orbit. Friction less environments are interesting things.
 
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