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(Foodbeast)   Budweiser admits its beer has no taste, so they're promising to launch a beer that will change that   (foodbeast.com) divider line 108
    More: Fail, Budweiser, taste, air launch  
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12651 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Jan 2013 at 3:50 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-14 12:03:59 AM
Sex in a canoe, etc.
 
2013-01-14 12:38:16 AM
FTFA: Yes, your beer tastes like aged cat piss

I wonder if Charisma Madarang did a taste test.
 
2013-01-14 01:00:41 AM
CSB time. When I was in middle school, my parents made me taste warm, skunked Budweiser. That was probably the most effective way to keep me from engaging in underage drinking that they could have thought up. I was out of college before I finally tasted beer again.
 
2013-01-14 01:09:55 AM

rynthetyn: CSB time. When I was in middle school, my parents made me taste warm, skunked Budweiser. That was probably the most effective way to keep me from engaging in underage drinking that they could have thought up. I was out of college before I finally tasted beer again.


That's child abuse.
 
2013-01-14 01:25:58 AM
Here we go.
 
2013-01-14 01:28:23 AM
How many times in recent memory have they tried to create a craftier (or gimmicky) beer, that didn't suck? Golden Wheat, Lime, Budweiser American Ale, Platinum, Select, etc.

Give it the f*ck up. You're not going to step into that market with another flavorless lager brewed with nothing in mind but cost and a requirement for 500+ million brazilian trillion barrel sustained replicability.
 
2013-01-14 03:57:16 AM
Big deal. They add some coloring, and yet another chemical.
Iodine is it?
 
2013-01-14 03:59:42 AM
In other news, Budweiser has hired the marketing team behind New Coke.
 
2013-01-14 04:05:24 AM

Bucky Katt:

FTFA: Yes, your beer tastes like aged cat piss

I wonder if Charisma Madarang did a taste test.


Beat me to it. Dammit.
 
2013-01-14 04:11:08 AM
Eh. I'm more of a cider guy myself, and besides that I'll take a local craft brew. Love a good hard cider, though there is only one bar within a 20 mile radius that has it on tap.

I might give this a try so I can at the least tell people I have tasted when I'm telling them it sucks.
 
2013-01-14 04:16:47 AM
When enough Budweiser Black Crown sits around unsold for a while, does it become Natural Ice Black Crown?
 
2013-01-14 04:18:51 AM
As an Australian, I am perfectly aware of the mass-produced beer market producing cat's piss. For decades, Australian alcohol tax laws meant that beer was effectively taxed based on its wholesale price, meaning the cheaper (and therefore nastier) you could brew beer, the less tax you paid per unit of volume. The result was beers like Fosters (which is in fact nastier here in Australia than the international version) or XXXX ("the reason it's called 4-X is you can't write Sh*t on a beer label"). Disgusting brews.

In just the last decade those laws have changed and Aussies are slowly but surely discovering the pleasures of microbrewed craft beer, particularly hoppy ales which just didn't exist in the bad old days. West Australians (who are per head of population the most affluent Australians) are particularly well served by microbreweries in Fremantle, and here in my home town of Adelaide our local Coopers Brewery (brewing their uniquely Australian version of English ales, to be drunk at near freezing temperatures) is now the largest Australian-owned brewery, the mass brewers all being owned by overseas interests.

Home-brewing has always been a pretty minor hobby sadly. Due to the size of the market and the nature of our climate, we just can't get the range of outstanding hops and malts which is available from producers in the US.

My point is that Americans are a bunch of lucky bastards and if you're not home-brewing with great local products easily available to you from all over your country (but I particularly tip my lid to Oregon), you're a fool to yourself and a burden to others.
 
2013-01-14 04:21:56 AM
Bud drinkers like Bud. Nothing wrong with that. But if you're a fan of craft beers, one of Anheuser Busch's "craft" offerings will never become your go-to drink. They still have the mass market mindset that just doesn't translate into creating a truly distinctive beer.
 
2013-01-14 04:25:07 AM
Yeah thats what I want. I want my cab driver ass sweat to be more flavorful.
 
2013-01-14 04:26:00 AM
img.submarino.com.br
is my beer of choice right now. Although I've been looking into homebrewing my own, starting with growing my own hops.

/curing my first batch of tobacco
//lol taxes
 
2013-01-14 04:28:51 AM

Soupysales: Bud drinkers like Bud. Nothing wrong with that. But if you're a fan of craft beers, one of Anheuser Busch's "craft" offerings will never become your go-to drink. They still have the mass market mindset that just doesn't translate into creating a truly distinctive beer.


Good point. If you want to brew a beer which will offend the least number of customers, it's not going to be particularly interesting.

The best solution is to brew a range of beers with varying flavours and allow your customers to identify their favourite (as some Australian microbreweries and presumably some US microbreweries do). The easy solution is to make a bland lager. Wonder which one they'll choose.
 
2013-01-14 04:33:01 AM

rynthetyn: CSB time. When I was in middle school, my parents made me taste warm, skunked Budweiser. That was probably the most effective way to keep me from engaging in underage drinking that they could have thought up. I was out of college before I finally tasted beer again.


For more CSB time: When I was 13 my family moved across town. While we were packing my parents, who were not drinkers, found a bottle of Jack Daniels that someone had given them as a gift. They called me into the kitchen and asked me if I would like to try a shot of Jack. Of course I said yes. After nearly puking from the nasty taste of whiskey, my parents told me to remember that experience if any of my friends tried to get me to drink in junior high or high school.

Of course, it didn't work. Whiskey became my drink of choice in college and has been ever since.
 
2013-01-14 04:33:35 AM
www.bruguru.com

/There is no other beer
 
2013-01-14 04:34:46 AM

robohobo: [img.submarino.com.br image 500x500]
is my beer of choice right now. Although I've been looking into homebrewing my own, starting with growing my own hops.

/curing my first batch of tobacco
//lol taxes


The range of Belgian beers available is amazing. Chimay is good, but (if you haven't already) I recommend giving Rochefort or St. Bernardus a try. Yummy.
 
2013-01-14 04:36:06 AM
"Black Crown" released nationwide on MLK Day? That's racist.
 
2013-01-14 04:36:49 AM

Aussie_As: Americans are a bunch of lucky bastards


The microbrew thing has been under full sail here for (as far as I've been aware, anyway) about 20 years now and this still seems weird to me. I now find myself whisking past the import section at the giant beer store, eager to see what they've got in domestics and I'm like, "how did this happen?"
 
2013-01-14 04:36:51 AM
www.whydoesthisnotexist.com

"NOW WITH FLAVOR!"
 
2013-01-14 04:38:36 AM

Soupysales: robohobo: [img.submarino.com.br image 500x500]
is my beer of choice right now. Although I've been looking into homebrewing my own, starting with growing my own hops.

/curing my first batch of tobacco
//lol taxes

The range of Belgian beers available is amazing. Chimay is good, but (if you haven't already) I recommend giving Rochefort or St. Bernardus a try. Yummy.


I first had Chimay in an irish pub/restaurant with the best corned beef sammich I've ever had. Had to get my local liquor store to order it for me. I've had Rocherfort, but I'll have to try St.Bernardus.
 
2013-01-14 04:40:05 AM

Aussie_As: The best solution is to brew a range of beers with varying flavours and allow your customers to identify their favourite (as some Australian microbreweries and presumably some US microbreweries do). The easy solution is to make a bland lager. Wonder which one they'll choose.


You are exactly right. Most microbrews (but not all) offer their standard ale, lager, wheat, and IPA. Then they move onto the more interesting stuff, the funky stouts, the imperial IPAs, the rye ales, etc. The large breweries already have their standards, but will never branch out into the interesting stuff, the market (by their numbers) just isn't big enough.
 
2013-01-14 04:42:08 AM

Soupysales: robohobo: [img.submarino.com.br image 500x500]
is my beer of choice right now. Although I've been looking into homebrewing my own, starting with growing my own hops.

/curing my first batch of tobacco
//lol taxes

The range of Belgian beers available is amazing. Chimay is good, but (if you haven't already) I recommend giving Rochefort or St. Bernardus a try. Yummy.


They are amazingly grand beers. But not particularly hoppy. Their use of wild yeasts is a big part of their character, and I'm not sure that (in my part of the world) I'd be leaving my wort open to the elements Belgian style and seeing what became of it as it brewed.

Chimay and Rochefort are absolutely world-class (can't speak for the other one but I'm sure you're right) and are one of the great examples of why beer is the best beverage. You can enjoy a world-class example of the genre, as brewed by Belgian monks, for little more than a few bucks. See how far you get as a wine, whiskey or brandy drinker with the change from the back of your sofa.
 
2013-01-14 04:42:32 AM
It won't sell well imo.

The folks that drink Budweiser don't drink it for taste.
 
2013-01-14 04:49:42 AM
Socially, it's trendier

"And that's when I shot him, your honor."

Drink what you enjoy.

/also, "craft beer"? It's all crafted, unless you happen to know of a natural spring, you hipster douchebags
 
2013-01-14 04:50:51 AM

robohobo: I first had Chimay in an irish pub/restaurant with the best corned beef sammich I've ever had. Had to get my local liquor store to order it for me. I've had Rocherfort, but I'll have to try St.Bernardus.


I'm generally an IPA/DIPA drinker, but I do have a soft spot for the Belgian beers. I went there last year and can't even remember how many different types I tried, but there were only a couple that I didn't enjoy. Westmalle and Leute Bok were two others that were memorable.
 
2013-01-14 04:55:32 AM
I tried this two days ago. It isn't good.
 
2013-01-14 04:55:56 AM

Aussie_As: They are amazingly grand beers. But not particularly hoppy. Their use of wild yeasts is a big part of their character, and I'm not sure that (in my part of the world) I'd be leaving my wort open to the elements Belgian style and seeing what became of it as it brewed.

Chimay and Rochefort are absolutely world-class (can't speak for the other one but I'm sure you're right) and are one of the great examples of why beer is the best beverage. You can enjoy a world-class example of the genre, as brewed by Belgian monks, for little more than a few bucks. See how far you get as a wine, whiskey or brandy drinker with the change from the back of your sofa.


Like I mentioned in my response to robohobo, I'm a big fan of the hoppy beers, but I also love the unique flavor of the Belgian beers. I don't know, you could brew the first Australian Belgian-style brew. I'm sure the innate horror of your land would infuse it with a taste like no other beer. You'd make millions.
 
2013-01-14 04:58:34 AM

ArcadianRefugee: Socially, it's trendier

"And that's when I shot him, your honor."

Drink what you enjoy.

/also, "craft beer"? It's all crafted, unless you happen to know of a natural spring, you hipster douchebags


Well technically I see your point. But it's a bit like calling an artist great because he was particularly efficient at using as few colours as possible. Yes it's had some effort put into it, but when the effort is as much about keeping the brewery's accountants happy as it is producing something which will sell some product, it's hardly the same as having a vision of the final product and doing what it takes to achieve it. I won't deny being a beer wanker (which is presumably Australian for hipster douchebag) but there are qualities to beer which are not entirely subjective. If it has a mouthfeel like someone dissolved some powdered ingredients into water, it's just not as pleasant as a well brewed beer.
 
2013-01-14 05:18:12 AM
Beer snobs snuck.
 
2013-01-14 05:26:54 AM
American Ale was better than regular Bud.
 
2013-01-14 05:39:01 AM

robohobo: Although I've been looking into homebrewing my own, starting with growing my own hops.


Trying to grow your own hops is a difficult place to start homebrewing. Hops flower once a year, require about a year of growth to produce enough flowers, and change so much with conditions you will need several generations. Replicating the flavor of certain hop strains you enjoy requires the rather precise conditions, including geographical location, which they were grown in. Worse, the work to establish alpha acid levels is not for casual homebrewers; you might create a decent batch for dryhopping, but bittering additions will be completely unknown and generally inconsistent. Plus, hops are basically the least inexpensive part of brewing until you get into keeping yeast.
 
2013-01-14 06:19:41 AM

Aussie_As: As an Australian, I am perfectly aware of the mass-produced beer market producing cat's piss. For decades, Australian alcohol tax laws meant that beer was effectively taxed based on its wholesale price, meaning the cheaper (and therefore nastier) you could brew beer, the less tax you paid per unit of volume. The result was beers like Fosters (which is in fact nastier here in Australia than the international version) or XXXX ("the reason it's called 4-X is you can't write Sh*t on a beer label"). Disgusting brews.

In just the last decade those laws have changed and Aussies are slowly but surely discovering the pleasures of microbrewed craft beer, particularly hoppy ales which just didn't exist in the bad old days. West Australians (who are per head of population the most affluent Australians) are particularly well served by microbreweries in Fremantle, and here in my home town of Adelaide our local Coopers Brewery (brewing their uniquely Australian version of English ales, to be drunk at near freezing temperatures) is now the largest Australian-owned brewery, the mass brewers all being owned by overseas interests.

Home-brewing has always been a pretty minor hobby sadly. Due to the size of the market and the nature of our climate, we just can't get the range of outstanding hops and malts which is available from producers in the US.

My point is that Americans are a bunch of lucky bastards and if you're not home-brewing with great local products easily available to you from all over your country (but I particularly tip my lid to Oregon), you're a fool to yourself and a burden to others.


Spent a month in Australia and two weeks in Adelade. Discovered Cooper's while I was there and absolutely LOVED it.

Wish you stingy bastards would export it!
 
2013-01-14 06:19:44 AM
"Sir people are moving from our non-American owned brand to Yuengling."

"What! Unacceptable! Let me have a look."

Takes a bottle, pour into glass and drink.

"Well sir?"

"Tell our brewers to let a batch cook for an extra five minutes so the malt darkens a little bit and call it something that'll lead people to believe it's a premium beer."

"Bravo sir, you done it again"
 
2013-01-14 06:33:24 AM

fastfxr: Aussie_As: As an Australian, I am perfectly aware of the mass-produced beer market producing cat's piss. For decades, Australian alcohol tax laws meant that beer was effectively taxed based on its wholesale price, meaning the cheaper (and therefore nastier) you could brew beer, the less tax you paid per unit of volume. The result was beers like Fosters (which is in fact nastier here in Australia than the international version) or XXXX ("the reason it's called 4-X is you can't write Sh*t on a beer label"). Disgusting brews.

In just the last decade those laws have changed and Aussies are slowly but surely discovering the pleasures of microbrewed craft beer, particularly hoppy ales which just didn't exist in the bad old days. West Australians (who are per head of population the most affluent Australians) are particularly well served by microbreweries in Fremantle, and here in my home town of Adelaide our local Coopers Brewery (brewing their uniquely Australian version of English ales, to be drunk at near freezing temperatures) is now the largest Australian-owned brewery, the mass brewers all being owned by overseas interests.

Home-brewing has always been a pretty minor hobby sadly. Due to the size of the market and the nature of our climate, we just can't get the range of outstanding hops and malts which is available from producers in the US.

My point is that Americans are a bunch of lucky bastards and if you're not home-brewing with great local products easily available to you from all over your country (but I particularly tip my lid to Oregon), you're a fool to yourself and a burden to others.

Spent a month in Australia and two weeks in Adelade. Discovered Cooper's while I was there and absolutely LOVED it.

Wish you stingy bastards would export it!


The export it. I've bought it at the SPECs stores in Houston and Austin.
 
2013-01-14 06:49:47 AM
I actually have a Project 12 twelve pack in my pantry now. This article says the Los Angeles batch is the winner. Meh. They were all just OK but the St Louis catch was better.
 
2013-01-14 06:56:06 AM
Mmmmm beer with flavor. I need to get my boyfriend to whip up some of his raspberry brown brew.


When I worked at SeaWorld, we used to get 2 cases a month. Free. Usually I would just give it all away or bring it to parties. Why? Because usually they would just give us Bud Light or Bud. I'd rather buy my own beer that tastes good, thank you!

But who am I kidding, I do miss free beer.
 
2013-01-14 07:12:42 AM
I switched from Yuengling to MGD for my yard work beer, but Stone's Sublimely self-righteous Ale or dogfish 90 minute are my evening brews. I don't mind budweiser.
 
2013-01-14 07:15:21 AM
I thought their American Ale was pretty good. As good as something like a Fat Tire, or Great Lakes? No. But as good as some of the Sam Adams or better mass market offerings? Probably. I'm sure they still make it; but I don't see it on store shelves anymore.
 
2013-01-14 07:23:57 AM
4.bp.blogspot.com

Approves.

/Hot Tuna
 
2013-01-14 07:29:30 AM
Meh - one word.

Coopers!
 
2013-01-14 07:43:18 AM
What is so surprising to me is the fact that Budweiser was bought by a Belgium company and it still sucks.

estore.samueladams.com

Samuel Adams, FTW.
 
2013-01-14 07:52:30 AM

Soupysales: robohobo: [img.submarino.com.br image 500x500]
is my beer of choice right now. Although I've been looking into homebrewing my own, starting with growing my own hops.

/curing my first batch of tobacco
//lol taxes

The range of Belgian beers available is amazing. Chimay is good, but (if you haven't already) I recommend giving Rochefort or St. Bernardus a try. Yummy.


This. The Trappist Rochefort 10 just absolutely blew my socks off, what a fantastic brew! So yeasty and smooth, like drinking sweet bread.
 
2013-01-14 07:54:04 AM
Nothing beats a good PBR or High Life.
 
2013-01-14 07:55:54 AM
Belgian "beer" and their fruity ale is farking backwash.

I drink macro brews when I want to tie one on quickly, but I prefer Imperial Stout and rye IPA.
 
2013-01-14 07:56:52 AM
Yeah OK - on the one hand my local brew is delicious.

Chimay and Rochefort do take the cherry.

Still I buy a Coopers' daily but the others are a rare treat.
 
2013-01-14 08:02:02 AM

Aussie_As: My point is that Americans are a bunch of lucky bastards and if you're not home-brewing with great local products easily available to you from all over your country (but I particularly tip my lid to Oregon), you're a fool to yourself and a burden to others.


preach it!

/I don't mind brewing
//bottling is a PITA, however
 
2013-01-14 08:02:23 AM

Jake Havechek: Belgian "beer" and their fruity ale is farking backwash.

I drink macro brews when I want to tie one on quickly, but I prefer Imperial Stout and rye IPA.


www.thegreatestbeerofalltime.com
One of my favorite Rye IPAs.

I just can't get into the stouts though, can't get over the coffee taste.
 
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