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(KATU)   The reason Windows 8 isn't catching on? Customers are "confused". I think the word they want is "baffled"   (katu.com) divider line 335
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4606 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 Jan 2013 at 1:21 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-14 06:09:06 AM  

Flint Ironstag:
Sales is one thing. Machines in use is way different. Sales of tablets are rocketing because they are new and the change in features and spec year to year is significant while PCs and laptops have matured and there is little reason to throw away a two year old laptop for this years model.

Sales of PCs have slumped because there are millions out there that do not need replacing, not because people are getting rid of them.


Ahh, but you're missing something with that statement: If PCs were still necessary and useful, new PCs would still be sold to people who didn't previously have a PC. Instead, as I mentioned earlier, what I see is people not having a desktop PC. They only work on a laptop. As the power and usability of tablets catches up, these same people will just work with tablets instead.


Most tablet sales are for people to use away from where they use their PC or laptop, be it on the train or on the sofa. Tablets are in addition to their "main" computer. If you can fine anyone who has actually thrown away their PC or laptop and is now using a tablet only I will be quite surprised.


I can easily find you people who only have a tablet. Hell, I've tried getting my mom to use computers for decades. Her PC is sitting in my basement right now, but she is happy as hell to use the tablet I got her! My g/f was trying to decide on a new laptop, and just getting a tablet was a serious consideration for her.

I doubt most people would throw out their laptops. But when their laptop finally dies they'll look at the tablet and have to really ask themselves if they need to replace the laptop.


In short, PCs and laptops will still be around for a long time.


Sure they will! Just like you can still get tape drives. They just won't be what the average person uses.
 
2013-01-14 06:13:13 AM  
If you own a touchscreen device, and like Windows, upgrade to Win8.
If you own a regular laptop or desktop, do not.
If you are buying a new computer, do not avoid Win8 - just get the computer you want, and if it has Win8 on it, tweak it a little to make it exactly like Win 7, if you need to.
This is a lot of fuss about nothing, except that MS was dumb to relase the X86 version at first - they should have just led off with the ARM powered Surface pads, and Win8 for ARM devices. One name for two operating systems is confusing.
 
2013-01-14 06:21:41 AM  
speaking from experience, my relatives HATE windows 8, and they're all casual users you would think would like this kind of stuff

makes me think the designers have no idea what people actually like in an OS, did they do no market testing? did their children design the layout?
 
2013-01-14 06:53:46 AM  
Part of an horrendously long 20 yr tradition, MS makes a good OS, follows if with shiat. Support one historic OS and make alternates banal.
 
2013-01-14 09:02:21 AM  

ReverendJasen: WhyteRaven74: How about an OS where the user decides how it'll look and behave?

Only problem is, most people can't be bothered to figure out how to run Windows apps in Linux.
:)


The other problem is once you get past Wines asshole interface using a standard popular 20 years ago most Windows apps run like shiat on Linux. I love Linux and run a Debian Mint machine myself but anyone who thinks Wine and virtualization is the answer to everything is a delusional asshole.
 
2013-01-14 09:03:23 AM  
I think it says something about the dominance of the windows platform that so many people seem to be emotionally disturbed by minor UI changes in windows 8. I used it, it was a bit of an adjustment, the back end is marginally faster and I like the backup and restore changes. To me it was worth a modest fee and putting up with the adjustment to a tweaked UI. It's just a damn OS folks. In a lot of ways it's the least important thing about your computing experience.
 
2013-01-14 09:25:11 AM  

red5ish: Telos: PC's are also a dying breed.

Maybe for home users who want to surf the internet and read their email this is true. For people who use their computers to do actual work, not so much.


The latest analysis out of Gartner agrees that PC's are taking the back seat for most users.

Analysts now appear to be shifting their basic premise about how consumers and businesses will use tablets in relation to PCs, says Mikako Kitagawa, principal analyst at Gartner.

"Tablets have dramatically changed the device landscape for PCs, not so much by 'cannibalizing' PC sales, but by causing PC users to shift consumption to tablets rather than replacing older PCs," she writes. "Whereas as once we imagined a world in which individual users would have both a PC and a tablet as personal devices, we increasingly suspect that most individuals will shift consumption activity to a personal tablet, and perform creative and administrative tasks on a shared PC. There will be some individuals who retain both, but we believe they will be exception and not the norm."


It looks like the future for most people will be a personal tablet for nearly all uses and then a communal desktop machine shared by the household.

This apparently explains Microsoft's drive to FUBAR Windows in an attempt to transition into the tablet space.

They've been wildly successful... at pissing off desktop users.
 
2013-01-14 10:03:15 AM  
Ok. Sell me on Windows 8. What makes it worth the money to upgrade from Win7 'Home Premium'? The machine plays video games (mainly DX9 ones), my browser is Chrome, I use Gmail for e-mail...

Beyond the interface change, sell me Windows 8, what makes it worth the money compared to my existing Win7 license?
 
2013-01-14 10:20:00 AM  

Vaneshi: Beyond the interface change, sell me Windows 8, what makes it worth the money compared to my existing Win7 license?


If your current setup is working just fine for you why would you change?
 
2013-01-14 10:27:49 AM  

Vaneshi: Ok. Sell me on Windows 8. What makes it worth the money to upgrade from Win7 'Home Premium'? The machine plays video games (mainly DX9 ones), my browser is Chrome, I use Gmail for e-mail...

Beyond the interface change, sell me Windows 8, what makes it worth the money compared to my existing Win7 license?


Nothing. I have both W7 and W8 conventional laptops and cannot detect ANY advantage in experience or performance to 8.
 
2013-01-14 10:31:49 AM  
The only reason I bought Windows 8 is because a copy of Windows was finally cheap enough to convince me to just buy it instead of pirate it. I never, ever in the 35 years on this planet paid real money for a version of Microsoft Windows. The $40 price tag was attractive though.
 
2013-01-14 11:37:51 AM  

Telos: Ahh, but you're missing something with that statement: If PCs were still necessary and useful, new PCs would still be sold to people who didn't previously have a PC. Instead, as I mentioned earlier, what I see is people not having a desktop PC. They only work on a laptop. As the power and usability of tablets catches up, these same people will just work with tablets instead.


PCs are harder to find in box stores. Go to a Best Buy and the majority of systems you see will be laptops/netbooks instead of tower PCs. PCs are lasting longer and/or moving more to an enthusiast, build-it-yourself market. That's not dying and it won't go away for years. Not until laptops can match the power, moddability and lower cost of a desktop. You won't ever see tablets replace PCs for people who require what a PC offers. You will see tablets replace PCs in a more casual market. For instance, my mother, who was fairly illiterate when it came to computers has a tablet. Its a lot easier for her to play some casual games, listen to music, read a book, browse the web. But she's not going to be doing a lot of typing. She's not going to be playing high end games where she requires a mouse/keyboard combination. She can get by with a low power system like a tablet for a couple hundred dollars instead of buying a budget desktop for $400 or so.

As a programmer and a gamer, a tablet to me is a toy. Granted, due to money and space in my home, I have a laptop so a tablet is not even interesting to me right now, but I could see how someone with a desktop might want to sync a tablet to the desktop so they can do some things while away from their "Home Base." A tablet is still never going to be useful for playing Call of Duty or Dishonored or WoW or anything like that.

 

Telos: I doubt most people would throw out their laptops. But when their laptop finally dies they'll look at the tablet and have to really ask themselves if they need to replace the laptop.


Again, looking at the majority, this is a possibility. But again, tablets are not going to replace laptops or desktops for the people who need those devices. Tablets are going to be more enticing to the people who DON'T need laptops or desktops and only had those devices because a tablet wasn't available. The more casual user.

jso2897: If you own a touchscreen device, and like Windows, upgrade to Win8.
If you own a regular laptop or desktop, do not.
If you are buying a new computer, do not avoid Win8 - just get the computer you want, and if it has Win8 on it, tweak it a little to make it exactly like Win 7, if you need to.
This is a lot of fuss about nothing, except that MS was dumb to relase the X86 version at first - they should have just led off with the ARM powered Surface pads, and Win8 for ARM devices. One name for two operating systems is confusing.


I wouldn't go out of my way to tell people that they should absolutely upgrade to Windows 8. I would tell them to give the new interface some time if they get a new system with it pre-installed. But, I would also say that if your going to try and make it look exactly like Windows 7, you are probably not doing yourself and favors. Keep in mind, when the mouse was introduced, people freaked. They didn't know if they were supposed to hold it up to the screen or talk into it. Through every iteration of Windows, people have chided design decisions behind changes that have stuck with the operating system to present. When XP came out, people insisted that there was no reason for all the color and why couldn't it just be flat and grey like 98 or 2000? Someone above mentioned all these changes that people bashed in Vista, but the same changes remained for Windows 7 and Windows 8 and they don't continue to be a complaint because they've been adopted.

Microsoft did take a gamble by forcing this change upon their users. It took me a few hours to get acclimated with the changes and change how I used a laptop. I never used the Windows key until I started using Windows 8. Chances are, I could probably use it to open my start menu since Windows 95. The search feature was introduced in vista, so I could have been easily searching for programs I wanted, say Winamp, with 6 keys. But, I, like most people, was used to the visual menus. So using Windows 7, I'm going to get to Winamp several different ways:

Menu: Using mouse I click the start menu, then assuming the program isn't pinned or in my most recently used, I have to click All Programs and then scroll or locate the Winamp folder, click to open the folder and then click on the program to launch it. Granted, you can eliminate a few clicks by pinning the program or by having the menus auto open when you hover over them, but I don't.

Search: I hit the windows key and then I type 'wina' and Windows has already found the link to the program I want and I click it.

Windows 8 Metro UI: If I use this program frequently, this method is by far the easiest. I can either use my mouse to hover over the general location where the start bar/button normally is and it brings up a little Metro UI popup (clicking it opens the Metro UI, which in reality is a full screen Start menu), or I can hit the windows key. If I have pinned the program and moved it to the front of my list, I can click the title, which will be right in the forefront to launch winamp. Its the exact same amount of keystrokes/mouseclicks that the regular start menu used if you had it pinned.

However, if you don't have the program pinned, you enter the Metro UI and then you scroll to the right, and unless you have unpinned completely, just click the tile. You've added a scroll from the above method, but its still not that bad. If you've completely unpinned it, then you have to right click and click on the All Apps button and then search though a much larger list of your programs to find the tile. But if your going to use the program, why not pin it to your start menu and move its tile to somewhere that you can find it quickly.

Personally, once you start thinking of the Metro UI as a full screen start menu, you'll notice that the difference between Windows 8 and Windows 7 are not all that crazy for the end user. Metro Apps should be understood as small programs that will behave more for tablets than regular desktop/laptops, so unless you intend to use the tablet version, the "legacy" program is still a better option for desktop/laptop users. The real meat and potatoes should be what new changes Windows 8 brings to your operating system to make it better overall, things that we'll be continuing to see in the future. These are the things that the average user will be mostly oblivious to but still make their experience better.

HybridBoot, which "hibernates" the kernal on shutdown, making your system boot up much quicker from a cold boot.

File History, allowing you to revert back to previous versions of a file from a backup media.

Storage Spaces, nice for desktop users with multiple hard drives, as you can combine them into virtual drives and specify mirroring and parity. Basically creating a virtual RAID array.

What I also find nice, is that since the boot times are so quick and you often cannot hit the button to launch bios before boot, Windows 8 includes a function to launch into advanced settings. This makes it harder for someone to hijack your system by playing with BIOS settings because they need to boot your system, get into an administration account, select the advanced boot settings, and then reboot. On old systems, we could easily launch into the BIOS and wreak havok because a majority of computer owners never password protect the BIOS.

Yes, Microsoft is trying to push users to adopt their brand, but that's no different from what Apple has been doing for years. Windows 8 and forward is going to seecompatibility with their computers, tablets, phones and the Xbox get more deeply intertwined. Moving to the "Microsoft Account" helps to blanket settings across your devices, and with some of the new Windows 8 apps, you can use your computer/laptop/tablet/phone to control your Xbox.

There is a learning curve here, but innovation is sometimes about trial and error.
 
2013-01-14 11:59:15 AM  

Celerian: There is a learning curve here, but innovation is sometimes about trial and error.


The "trial and error" is supposed to happen in user studies when the software is in beta, or even pre-beta, condition. You give the product to representative users to try out for a while, find out what they like and don't like, and change the product so that you're giving the greatest number of users what they like and the fewest users what they hate.

I can't fathom how Microsoft could have gone through a usability analysis process and reached the conclusion that Metro was release-ready.
 
2013-01-14 12:15:21 PM  

poot_rootbeer: Celerian: There is a learning curve here, but innovation is sometimes about trial and error.

The "trial and error" is supposed to happen in user studies when the software is in beta, or even pre-beta, condition. You give the product to representative users to try out for a while, find out what they like and don't like, and change the product so that you're giving the greatest number of users what they like and the fewest users what they hate.

I can't fathom how Microsoft could have gone through a usability analysis process and reached the conclusion that Metro was release-ready.


It is possible that they DID and the final result is what got released. Keep in mind that even with user studies, some of the design decisions are going to ultimately be left alone in favor of the company's agenda.

I think about how I, too, would have loved to see the ability to completely turn off the Metro UI and just have a start menu, but then I realized that I wouldn't be using my computer any differently. Maybe most people don't really WANT different, but I actually enjoyed the challenge, and I still have fun when I come across something new that I didn't realize before. Just after having used the system for two months now, I can't honestly say that my system is HARDER to use and I have a reason to go back to Windows 7. And that was the tipping point for me. I got the laptop and I said, "Well, from what I've heard I'm not expecting to LOVE windows 8, so its a good thing I have a copy of Windows 7 sitting in my closet. If I can't stand the new OS, I'll wipe it and go back." The more I used it, the easier it became to use and the more I learned about features I had previously ignored, and it also had advancements to the inner workings of the operating system that I would lose if I went back. Given time, the initial negatives disappeared and the positives remained, so I stick by Windows 8 as being a sold operating system once you get past the learning curve. Many users will not want to bother, and I'm sure Microsoft was aware of that. I have yet to meet someone who has actively TRIED to use and like the new system and hasn't. I have met tons of people who expected to hate it, saw things were changed slightly, and biatched about it needing to go back to familiarity.
 
2013-01-14 12:22:48 PM  

oh_please: LasersHurt: Holy shiat, guys, press the Windows key. There, everything's back the way it was.

It's so easy to use, and been completely stable. I don't know what has given you guys such trouble.

Except, "Where's the Start button on my desktop?"

"I'm in a program and can't get out of it!"

"How do I restart/shut down?"

"I don't know how to find a file"

"How do I get rid of all these buttons I never use? I don't want to go to HP.com or Ebay!"

...and on and on and on.

Metro is a solid interface for phones/tablets, but it's horribly clunky on an actual PC, Grandma will have to relearn everything. She may as well get an Apple.


The Tiles are completely useless. There is no easy way to manuver like in previous versions on windows.

And to the people that think it is stable? Go into you system logs and see all of the shiat happening behind the scenes..... just a matter of time before you get a critical error....... like if you plug something into USB while it is going into power down hibernate mode. Yep that was a good one. Good news is I lost all of the tiles when it happened! WOOT!
 
2013-01-14 12:34:41 PM  

shifter_: And to the people that think it is stable? Go into you system logs and see all of the shiat happening behind the scenes..... just a matter of time before you get a critical error....... like if you plug something into USB while it is going into power down hibernate mode. Yep that was a good one. Good news is I lost all of the tiles when it happened! WOOT!


On a similar note, apparently you can BSOD (black, in this case) Windows Phone 8 and have it ask you to insert a CD.

Probably not all too common, but still amusing
 
2013-01-14 01:53:01 PM  
MightyPez: On a similar note, apparently you can BSOD (black, in this case) Windows Phone 8 and have it ask you to insert a CD.

Except that is not a BSOD, it is the Boot Loader. Apparently the owner of the phone was flashing, screwed something up, and got the standard Boot Loader error message.
 
2013-01-14 02:58:45 PM  
I think the real problem with windows 8 is that the program icons and widgets don't have a complex enough "appearance" sequence. Back in the mid 90's, when clicking the start button, you instantly saw the contents of the menu. Eventually this was upgraded to an animated scroll up of the menu contents. This was a nice feature as it allowed you to catch your breath momentarily while waiting for the icons to appear. Later versions of windows replaced this with a fade. It gave the same refreshing wait time to see the menu contents, but in a different flavor that made the experience exciting and new. Now with windows 8 we have nice scrolling, zooming, and fading effect as well as a slightly increased delay time for the contents to appear. What I would really like to see Microsoft do is take it to the next level. I'd like it if when you right clicked an icon, little animated robots (with big cute eyes) ran out onto the desktop and started to build the menu. It would be funny if some of the robots slipped or made mistakes that other robots had to fix. For instance, one robot could misspell the word 'properties' at the bottom of the menu and another robot could smack him (in a cute way) and fix his mistake. Then when they are finished building the menu they could join hands and dance around the menu box.
 
2013-01-14 03:14:45 PM  
Apart from the usual teething problems-two different browsers, finding the new locations of stuff like power buttons, etc-the real issue I've been seeing on my new Windows 8 laptop seems to be rare; it switches to Metro randomly. In the middle of typing something into a search bar, for instance. Super duper frustrating.
 
2013-01-14 04:06:55 PM  

WxAxGxS: cmunic8r99: When they introduced the Ribbon in Office 2007, people biatched about it, too. Yet, I don't think it slowed adoption much, and the interface has stuck around for a while.

The ribbon is awful. Can anyone explain to me why they removed the double-click feature for bringing up object properties? And then even when you open up the object properties they broke everything down into separate tabs. Everything takes 2-3 times as long, particularly since I have to translate every pictograph into english. That "size and position" button? Just kidding. It's just size. You have to click an extra button to get to position. Sure, there's plenty of white space to include both, but that would be too easy.

And I am always pausing to figure out which little GIF houses the feature I used to be able to access with a single key combination or at most two clicks. I'll take drop-down menus any day with a shortcut bar, but why can't they at least let us remove all the pictographs from the ribbon? They waste so much space and distract from finding what I actually want.

There were plenty of improvements from 2003 to 2007/2010, but that ribbon is the worst possible change for a user who does anything but make middle school quality presentations.


Ubit Menu for Office 2007-10. It doesn't address all your complaints, but it gets a lot of them.

/the Ribbon is AIDS in digital form
//how the fark does throwing EVERYTHING at you in a bar full of differently sized & shaped icons, bogarting a quarter of the screen, make things easier?
 
2013-01-14 04:18:46 PM  

Marine1: 3. They're changing the mouse-keyboard paradigm? Good. Windows 8 has forced OEMs to try new designs and has revolutionized product offerings across the board. As a developer, I'm excited to take advantage of the changes offered.


Well, as an end user who has to spend 40+ hours a week manipulating, merging, and analyzing 700 MB data files, I hope the OEMs continue to tell MS to fark off and die. Some of us use computers for real work, not (just) playing Angry Birds and watching pr0n.
 
2013-01-14 04:33:01 PM  

Marine1: oh_please: Flint Ironstag: Why didn't they leave the Start button and menu in the classic desktop and have Metro as an option?

Because MS is desperate for market share in phones/tablets, and by forcing a mobile UI to the PC crowd, is gambling that they'll stay with it down the road. It might work.

In the meantime, they're pissing off a whole lot of people.

They're pissing off idiots. That's all. And to be honest, I don't care if idiots get pissed off.


I would love to know who you develop for, so I can go out of my way to never, ever buy one of their products. What a sanctimonious prick you are. "The whole world hates W8, except for me and the 2 other shills in this thread? Clearly the problem is with the world!"
 
2013-01-14 04:53:05 PM  

Egoy3k: It's just a damn OS folks. In a lot of ways it's the least important thing about your computing experience.


No, considering it's what makes the computer "go", it's arguably the MOST important part of the computing experience. That's like saying the engine is the least important part of the driving experience.
 
2013-01-14 06:43:07 PM  

extroverted_suicide: Some of us use computers for real work, not (just) playing Angry Birds and watching pr0n.


What about Angry Bird pr0n?

Not looking for Rule 34.
 
2013-01-14 08:06:37 PM  
i bought a new windows 8 machine 2 weeks ago. i returned it for a full refund within 5 days and have my first apple product, a macbook air.

the apple product i took out of the box and was able to get work shiat done. the windows 8 machine may as well have had chineese letters on the keyboard..

im pissed off that my work laptop crapped out, im 3 days behind in my work, and the new machine i get with the latest and greatest windows version has me scratching my head trying to figure out how to turn the thing off.

one of the 1st things i did was google 'windows 8 power off".. screw that.

i get that the fark geeeks think me weak for getting beat by that new machine, but i dont have the time or inclination to noodle through when i was very happy with win 7 and the look of windows for the past decade.

screw microsoft. im joe average, and if i hated windows 8 so much that i returned it in less than a week than this version will be a colossal failure, no matter what the fark geeks think.
 
2013-01-14 11:30:34 PM  

Flint Ironstag: viscountalpha: I still have XP. I know I need to move up to Windows 7 But i'm in no hurry to waste 100$ on something I don't need.

I think the $40 upgrade offer is still valid until the end of January. I went from XP to W8 and am very happy, once I installed Classic Shell. Try it and see, you might get on with it without Classic Shell but if you need it it's free. Start 8 is similar and only costs $5.
If you have a fairly modern dual core mobo/CPU then definitely go for it. XP just couldn't run dual core processors properly. W8 is far faster, smoother and has lots of neat tools like automatic backup and restore options.



I'd upgrade to windows 8 only to downgrade to windows 7.
 
2013-01-15 03:29:31 AM  

feelslikerain: i bought a new windows 8 machine 2 weeks ago. i returned it for a full refund within 5 days and have my first apple product, a macbook air.

the apple product i took out of the box and was able to get work shiat done. the windows 8 machine may as well have had chineese letters on the keyboard..

im pissed off that my work laptop crapped out, im 3 days behind in my work, and the new machine i get with the latest and greatest windows version has me scratching my head trying to figure out how to turn the thing off.

one of the 1st things i did was google 'windows 8 power off".. screw that.

i get that the fark geeeks think me weak for getting beat by that new machine, but i dont have the time or inclination to noodle through when i was very happy with win 7 and the look of windows for the past decade.

screw microsoft. im joe average, and if i hated windows 8 so much that i returned it in less than a week than this version will be a colossal failure, no matter what the fark geeks think.


Your shift key is broken.
 
2013-01-15 06:30:30 AM  

viscountalpha: Flint Ironstag: viscountalpha: I still have XP. I know I need to move up to Windows 7 But i'm in no hurry to waste 100$ on something I don't need.

I think the $40 upgrade offer is still valid until the end of January. I went from XP to W8 and am very happy, once I installed Classic Shell. Try it and see, you might get on with it without Classic Shell but if you need it it's free. Start 8 is similar and only costs $5.
If you have a fairly modern dual core mobo/CPU then definitely go for it. XP just couldn't run dual core processors properly. W8 is far faster, smoother and has lots of neat tools like automatic backup and restore options.


I'd upgrade to windows 8 only to downgrade to windows 7.


The upgrade offer doesn't include the downgrade to 7 option. AFAIK only the full price licence does.

Just get Classic Shell. It's free and 8 runs faster.
 
2013-01-15 06:31:33 AM  

styckx: feelslikerain: i bought a new windows 8 machine 2 weeks ago. i returned it for a full refund within 5 days and have my first apple product, a macbook air.

the apple product i took out of the box and was able to get work shiat done. the windows 8 machine may as well have had chineese letters on the keyboard..

im pissed off that my work laptop crapped out, im 3 days behind in my work, and the new machine i get with the latest and greatest windows version has me scratching my head trying to figure out how to turn the thing off.

one of the 1st things i did was google 'windows 8 power off".. screw that.

i get that the fark geeeks think me weak for getting beat by that new machine, but i dont have the time or inclination to noodle through when i was very happy with win 7 and the look of windows for the past decade.

screw microsoft. im joe average, and if i hated windows 8 so much that i returned it in less than a week than this version will be a colossal failure, no matter what the fark geeks think.

Your shift key is broken.


Apple haven't invented the shift key yet.
 
2013-01-15 11:40:24 AM  

BizarreMan: extroverted_suicide: Some of us use computers for real work, not (just) playing Angry Birds and watching pr0n.

What about Angry Bird pr0n?

Not looking for Rule 34.


Of course you're not.

(But don't worry, NO EXCEPTIONS)
 
2013-01-15 02:36:47 PM  

extroverted_suicide: Egoy3k: It's just a damn OS folks. In a lot of ways it's the least important thing about your computing experience.

No, considering it's what makes the computer "go", it's arguably the MOST important part of the computing experience. That's like saying the engine is the least important part of the driving experience.


I'm way late to this but you cannot honestly say that, skype, webbrowsing (including facebook and webmail), instant messaging, word processing, spreadsheets, and any of the other most common tasks performed on a computer have anything to do with the OS that is running the program or the OS.

Almost everything that the vast majority of people do these days is based in their browser, to them their OS is just where their browser icon lives and that's about it. I didn't say that the OS was unimportant just that it doesn't have much bearing on your experience with using the computer.

Using your car analogy the OS wouldn't be the engine, that is the motherboard, RAM, and CPU combination, as that's what gives the computer the power to compute, the OS is the ECM. If I swapped out your ECM for one with slightly different one you'd notice for sure but the car would still get you from A to B and after a couple of days you wouldn't notice the different acceleration behavior and shifting etc.
 
2013-01-15 03:31:05 PM  
So what have we learned here?

1: Win 8 is not such a terrible system for most power users, unfortunately, most users defending Win 8 admitted that it was not a pleasant experience at first (aside from a few MS shills).

2: It's horribly unintuitive for anyone who has used a Windows machine for a while. If you have to Google how to do basic tasks, such as close a farking program, that's a problem.

3. If you've never used a computer in your life, you may like it, because there's nothing to unlearn.

4. The Linux folks just aren't trolling like they used to.

5. Tech support people are actively encouraging their clients to stay away from 8, because they don't want the farking nightmares.

6. Win 8 is sorta like a car that either doesn't have a steering wheel...or has the pedals in the wrong place...or GODDAMNIT NANA PRESS THE FARKING WINDOWS KEY LIKE I TOLD YOU TEN TIMES...WHAT ARE YOU PRESSING? NO, THE ONE NEXT TO ALT...NO, THAT'S THE SPACEBAR! LOOK, YOU KNOW I LOVE YOU AND I'M YOUR SPECIAL LITTLE PUNKIN BUT GODDAMNARRRGH
 
2013-01-15 04:53:25 PM  

Egoy3k: I'm way late to this but you cannot honestly say that, skype, webbrowsing (including facebook and webmail), instant messaging, word processing, spreadsheets, and any of the other most common tasks performed on a computer have anything to do with the OS that is running the program or the OS.


Yes, actually. If you know anything about how computers work, you know that the OS is what really does most of the work and it can have a huge effect on how programs run. It isn't just the interface you use to launch apps, it's the way those apps use your system resources.
 
NFA [TotalFark]
2013-01-15 07:56:38 PM  

saintstryfe: Well, remember, Apple did this too, in 2001 when they released OS X 10.1. They completely overhauled it to the point older apps only worked in a weird compatibility mode. It was a strange transition - especially if you used big Apple apps like Photoshop which struggled and hemmed and hawed about getting compatible.


Yes, but they did it because they changed their hardware so the OS had to be rewritten to accommodate it.  Essentially they changed the entire system for the better.  The hardware was different the operating system was rewritten from scratch YET it wasn't so different that the user of the previous OS had difficultly with it.   I was using MAC's then and owned a MAC on both sides of the change over.  It's not remotely the same.
 
2013-01-16 08:35:03 AM  

Telos: Egoy3k: I'm way late to this but you cannot honestly say that, skype, webbrowsing (including facebook and webmail), instant messaging, word processing, spreadsheets, and any of the other most common tasks performed on a computer have anything to do with the OS that is running the program or the OS.

Yes, actually. If you know anything about how computers work, you know that the OS is what really does most of the work and it can have a huge effect on how programs run. It isn't just the interface you use to launch apps, it's the way those apps use your system resources.


Really? So you mean to say that thuis part of my post that you must have missed was completely correct?

I didn't say that the OS was unimportant just that it doesn't have much bearing on your experience with using the computer.

I know how it works, you seem to as well, as does almost everyone else in this thread. Grandma and Dave in the shipping department don't know, don't care, and can't tell the difference. They just want to look up recipes online and send Facebook messages to girls with hot profile pictures. They use software made for wide audiences that works good enough for them on either of the two major operating systems. They don't care how much memory a program is using, they don't care how efficient the OS is at common tasks. As long as they can see picture of their grand-kids and browse youporn they are happy. When they can't do those things they don't find out that operating system X doesn't handle system resources efficiently, they go buy a new computer because this one is 'broke'.
 
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