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(Daily Mail)   Someone has invented anti-flubber   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 43
    More: Amusing, wraps, Newtonian, popsci, viscosity, non-Newtonian fluid, orange  
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6742 clicks; posted to Geek » on 12 Jan 2013 at 10:25 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-12 10:01:18 PM
Who are they to say silly putty isn't useful in a combat situation?
 
2013-01-12 10:29:30 PM
Motorcycle and football helmet lining? I wonder if it would work.
 
2013-01-12 10:34:55 PM

0Icky0: Motorcycle and football helmet lining? I wonder if it would work.


i dunno. with those you want the material to stay soft to lessen the shock. i don't think i want a material that turns into a rock when my head strikes it at speed. the shells on helmets are already hard to prevent them from breaking apart.

Hmm.. i wonder if you could make a bullet of the stuff. coat it with a thin plastic veneer so it doesnt fall apart in chamber, then after it penetrates the target, it just kinda melts away. Interesting idea(without practical application)

We thought he was shot with a bullet, but all we found was an orange goo.
 
2013-01-12 10:42:28 PM
That "protective orange goo" just happens to be...MY WIFE!
 
2013-01-12 10:45:28 PM

SwingDancer: i dunno. with those you want the material to stay soft to lessen the shock. i don't think i want a material that turns into a rock when my head strikes it at speed. the shells on helmets are already hard to prevent them from breaking apart


Think of his finger as his head. He'shiatting it with a hammer and not feeling it.
Would it be the same? Kind of hard to get my head around it.
I don't think the stuff is going hard..it's dissipating the incoming energy.
I'd like to see a test on a head. Somebody else's head.
 
2013-01-12 10:48:04 PM

SwingDancer: the shells on helmets are already hard to prevent them from breaking apart.


After more thought..it might prevent your skull from cracking, but it won't be able to do anything for your brain decelerating from 65 to 0 in a fraction of a second. It's that sloshing around inside your skull that ruins your day.
 
2013-01-12 10:50:55 PM
Does it stand on Zanzibar?
/probably obscure
 
2013-01-12 10:57:09 PM
i.imgur.com

/Still waiting on Securefoam
 
2013-01-12 11:02:47 PM

Ghastly: Who are they to say silly putty isn't useful in a combat situation?


As a non-Newtonian fluid, it's too stiff to use as reactive protection - it shatters upon impact. Good for other things, mind you, just not for that.
 
2013-01-12 11:16:23 PM
Apparently it is already in use in sports equipment: Link

But, yeah, I would really like to see the testing data in regards to impact testing compared to other more widely used materials.
 
2013-01-12 11:20:19 PM
www.telnets.org

Waiting for the white and blue "goos"
 
2013-01-12 11:21:06 PM
My belly is also anti-flubber
 
2013-01-12 11:24:16 PM

SwingDancer: Hmm.. i wonder if you could make a bullet of the stuff. coat it with a thin plastic veneer so it doesnt fall apart in chamber, then after it penetrates the target, it just kinda melts away. Interesting idea(without practical application)


Farily practical.
 
2013-01-12 11:31:34 PM
So someone reinvented corn starch + water. Brilliant!
 
2013-01-12 11:32:27 PM
Cornstarch paste behaves this way.

Some friends of mine once partially filled a bathtub (at an SF Convention hotel, I'm sure the cleaning folks loved that) with cornstarch paste, which you could walk across without sinking in, AS LONG AS YOU KEPT MOVING.

Also, unset cement behaves this way. I discovered that when I inflated a balloon with cement. It was quite difficult. Once the cement cured, the result was a bit strange.
 
2013-01-12 11:32:54 PM
I could see this stuff's advantages in athletic supporter cups.
 
2013-01-12 11:35:14 PM

0Icky0: SwingDancer: the shells on helmets are already hard to prevent them from breaking apart.

After more thought..it might prevent your skull from cracking, but it won't be able to do anything for your brain decelerating from 65 to 0 in a fraction of a second. It's that sloshing around inside your skull that ruins your day.


This stuff is used more in race leathers and other body armor than in helmets. I'm pretty sure my last GP jacket had some in the elbows and shoulders. It's light an flexible while you're riding, but can protect your joints from impact during a crash because the fluid absorbs some of the impact energy during its viscosity change, while transmitting the rest over a larger area by becoming stiff at the right time. You are correct that it wouldn't do much for your brain as part of a helmet.

The main factor in motorcycle head injuries during crashes is height, not speed, so helmets are only designed to protect your head against vertical drops up to about 2 meters. If your head impacts a heavy object going much more than 7 or 8 m/s, the helmet isn't going to do a whole lot for you. It might keep you head from splitting, but your brain is still going to be hamburger.
 
2013-01-12 11:42:54 PM

msupf: But, yeah, I would really like to see the testing data in regards to impact testing compared to other more widely used materials.


The company that produces 3DO has been reluctant to release exact force transmission numbers, but it seems to perform about as well in crash tests as some of the newer closed-cell foam armor that companies like Alpinestars are using.
 
2013-01-12 11:47:14 PM
What do you mean, subby? It falls down when showered with radioactive particles? We have that already. It's called everything.*


*Except birds, bats, bees, helium, and some inter-galactic hitchhikers.
 
2013-01-12 11:47:36 PM

TofuTheAlmighty: So someone reinvented corn starch + water. Brilliant!



Cornstarch paste dries and becomes useless. From what I can tell of this stuff it maintains a gel form over only hardening when exposed to impact.
 
2013-01-13 12:09:49 AM

Z-clipped: msupf: But, yeah, I would really like to see the testing data in regards to impact testing compared to other more widely used materials.

The company that produces 3DO has been reluctant to release exact force transmission numbers, but it seems to perform about as well in crash tests as some of the newer closed-cell foam armor that companies like Alpinestars are using.


And that right there is a deal breaker for me. Until/unless they are willing to publish all their testing data so that it can be compared to other new or more widely used materials I don't believe it to be as efficacious as they claim.

They (or the companies that decide to partner with them) need to show us the science. Otherwise they allow people to draw the conclusion that they are hiding something, more than likely by just wildly over-stating its capabilities.
 
2013-01-13 12:28:55 AM

0Icky0: SwingDancer: i dunno. with those you want the material to stay soft to lessen the shock. i don't think i want a material that turns into a rock when my head strikes it at speed. the shells on helmets are already hard to prevent them from breaking apart

Think of his finger as his head. He'shiatting it with a hammer and not feeling it.
.


Jesus Christ, how loose is his asshole?
 
2013-01-13 12:31:42 AM
My phone case has a layer of D3O in it.
 
2013-01-13 12:49:59 AM

msupf: Z-clipped: msupf: But, yeah, I would really like to see the testing data in regards to impact testing compared to other more widely used materials.

The company that produces 3DO has been reluctant to release exact force transmission numbers, but it seems to perform about as well in crash tests as some of the newer closed-cell foam armor that companies like Alpinestars are using.

And that right there is a deal breaker for me. Until/unless they are willing to publish all their testing data so that it can be compared to other new or more widely used materials I don't believe it to be as efficacious as they claim.

They (or the companies that decide to partner with them) need to show us the science. Otherwise they allow people to draw the conclusion that they are hiding something, more than likely by just wildly over-stating its capabilities.


Well, to be fair, Alpinestars has been equally as hush-hush about their Bio Armor data.

But I can personally attest to the fact that 3DO works well in a crash. My last wreck was an 85mph low-side with my knee on the ground, and my ICON jacket performed extremely well, considering my body hit the bike during the slide. I had no residual joint pain, and would have had zero bruising except for the fact that I (stupidly) had a Sigg water bottle in my backpack. Damn thing nearly broke my shoulder blade for me.

Also, from a Physics standpoint the main benefit of 3DO over foam is that foam loses more of its ability to dissipate force at higher temperatures than non-Newtonian fluids.

In any case, you have two products that work about equally well. I would temper your skepticism a bit. Don't let it deter you from buying a product that you really like. It's good stuff.
 
2013-01-13 01:15:55 AM

Z-clipped: msupf: Z-clipped: msupf: But, yeah, I would really like to see the testing data in regards to impact testing compared to other more widely used materials.

The company that produces 3DO has been reluctant to release exact force transmission numbers, but it seems to perform about as well in crash tests as some of the newer closed-cell foam armor that companies like Alpinestars are using.

And that right there is a deal breaker for me. Until/unless they are willing to publish all their testing data so that it can be compared to other new or more widely used materials I don't believe it to be as efficacious as they claim.

They (or the companies that decide to partner with them) need to show us the science. Otherwise they allow people to draw the conclusion that they are hiding something, more than likely by just wildly over-stating its capabilities.

Well, to be fair, Alpinestars has been equally as hush-hush about their Bio Armor data.

But I can personally attest to the fact that 3DO works well in a crash. My last wreck was an 85mph low-side with my knee on the ground, and my ICON jacket performed extremely well, considering my body hit the bike during the slide. I had no residual joint pain, and would have had zero bruising except for the fact that I (stupidly) had a Sigg water bottle in my backpack. Damn thing nearly broke my shoulder blade for me.

Also, from a Physics standpoint the main benefit of 3DO over foam is that foam loses more of its ability to dissipate force at higher temperatures than non-Newtonian fluids.

In any case, you have two products that work about equally well. I would temper your skepticism a bit. Don't let it deter you from buying a product that you really like. It's good stuff.


Oh, I've read about its effectiveness, and seen various tests, so I know it is a useful product. I just have reservations about its claims if they aren't willing to share testing data or have various safety agencies testing it. I so know they've had issues with temperature changes affecting the product, but they were never really clear on how bad it got, and what kind of change needs to be made to make it unsafe.
 
2013-01-13 01:31:39 AM

msupf: I just have reservations about its claims if they aren't willing to share testing data or have various safety agencies testing it.


3DO is absolutely rated by safety agencies. It's CE certified under both EN 1991 and 2003 provisions. You can't get a better recommendation from a gov't agency than that.
 
2013-01-13 02:07:15 AM
Since Palmer and his team completed development of D3O in 2005.

I thought I saw this stuff being featured on some TV show or trade show years ago.
 
2013-01-13 03:33:57 AM
Sorbothane called and wants the 80's back.
 
2013-01-13 04:25:16 AM
Is this the same stuff that was in those shoe inserts?  I remember the guy going on TV, putting the insert over his hand, and then hitting it with a hammer.
 
2013-01-13 06:41:35 AM
Do not taunt magical orange goo
 
2013-01-13 07:54:04 AM
I'll be tanjed. Larry Niven's impact armor ;)
 
2013-01-13 09:26:20 AM

msupf: Z-clipped: msupf: Z-clipped: msupf: But, yeah, I would really like to see the testing data in regards to impact testing compared to other more widely used materials.

The company that produces 3DO has been reluctant to release exact force transmission numbers, but it seems to perform about as well in crash tests as some of the newer closed-cell foam armor that companies like Alpinestars are using.

And that right there is a deal breaker for me. Until/unless they are willing to publish all their testing data so that it can be compared to other new or more widely used materials I don't believe it to be as efficacious as they claim.

They (or the companies that decide to partner with them) need to show us the science. Otherwise they allow people to draw the conclusion that they are hiding something, more than likely by just wildly over-stating its capabilities.

Well, to be fair, Alpinestars has been equally as hush-hush about their Bio Armor data.

But I can personally attest to the fact that 3DO works well in a crash. My last wreck was an 85mph low-side with my knee on the ground, and my ICON jacket performed extremely well, considering my body hit the bike during the slide. I had no residual joint pain, and would have had zero bruising except for the fact that I (stupidly) had a Sigg water bottle in my backpack. Damn thing nearly broke my shoulder blade for me.

Also, from a Physics standpoint the main benefit of 3DO over foam is that foam loses more of its ability to dissipate force at higher temperatures than non-Newtonian fluids.

In any case, you have two products that work about equally well. I would temper your skepticism a bit. Don't let it deter you from buying a product that you really like. It's good stuff.

Oh, I've read about its effectiveness, and seen various tests, so I know it is a useful product. I just have reservations about its claims if they aren't willing to share testing data or have various safety agencies testing it. I so know they've had issues with temperature changes affecting the product, but they were never really clear on how bad it got, and what kind of change needs to be made to make it unsafe.


Is there anything preventing someone from buying it and doing their own tests?
 
2013-01-13 10:50:39 AM

FormlessOne: Ghastly: Who are they to say silly putty isn't useful in a combat situation?

As a non-Newtonian fluid, it's too stiff to use as reactive protection - it shatters upon impact. Good for other things, mind you, just not for that.


Back in the 80s I held an entire Soviet tank division at bay with nothing more than an egg of Silly Putty and the colour comics from the Sunday paper. Don't tell me it has no tactical use.
 
2013-01-13 12:00:45 PM
3DO is pretty cool stuff. I remember seeing it seven or eight years ago when they were trying to break into the hockey market. I believe some of the olympic skiers were using 3DO or a similar material in the arms of their suits for slalom races, so they could bang the gates with their arms and still be protected.
 
2013-01-13 01:22:37 PM
I've seen this stuff. It also makes you run really fast if you spray it all over the floor.
 
2013-01-13 03:27:00 PM

SpinStopper: I'll be tanjed. Larry Niven's impact armor ;)


But I wan't my laser flashlight too, dammit!
 
2013-01-13 03:49:11 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Does it stand on Zanzibar?
/probably obscure


Do sheep look up?
 
2013-01-13 04:12:57 PM

notsosilentbob: 3DO is pretty cool stuff. I remember seeing it seven or eight years ago when they were trying to break into the hockey market. I believe some of the olympic skiers were using 3DO or a similar material in the arms of their suits for slalom races, so they could bang the gates with their arms and still be protected.


i34.tinypic.comLINK! Mah boi!
 
2013-01-13 08:54:54 PM
Dumb question:

Is it pronounced Three Dee Oh, Three Dee Zero, or Three Do?
 
2013-01-14 12:39:19 AM

BlueSimian: Dumb question:

Is it pronounced Three Dee Oh, Three Dee Zero, or Three Do?


I used to always pronounce it Three Dee Oh.
 
2013-01-14 02:23:03 AM

SpinStopper: I'll be tanjed. Larry Niven's impact armor ;)


Tanstaafl - the energy has to go somewhere. It'll be interesting to see how this works in practice.
 
2013-01-14 02:31:36 PM
Have a hat and pants with D30 for snowboarding. The pants have tailbone, hip, and knee pads. Works really really well. Only issue is making sure the hat/pads say in place during a fall.
 
2013-01-14 06:44:08 PM
Anti-flubber is called mud or pudding or shiate. All of them have been around a while.
 
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