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(FX Cuisine)   Wannabe chef travels to Dehillerin, the 'Mecca for Chefs around the world' for centuries, and is promptly told he's a moron. Multiple times. And laughed at. By the staff. Guess the nation   (fxcuisine.com) divider line 27
    More: Obvious, Mecca, Dehillerin, saucepan, asparagus, canisters  
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20204 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Jan 2013 at 1:38 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2013-01-12 01:51:08 PM
5 votes:
They guy asked for of a knife was designed to cut roasts, and the clerk showed him a better choice.

ZOMG, how rude!
2013-01-12 01:09:42 PM
5 votes:
9/13/2006

timely find subby.
2013-01-12 01:52:33 PM
3 votes:
"dented" knife?

LOL

serrated. what a farking retard.
2013-01-12 01:46:58 PM
3 votes:
This shop is quite well known, but this store originally caters to professionals, not lollygagers who comes on a whim to browse at stuff. I'm supposed they are tired of the tourists who treat them as a tourist attraction. If you know what you want and ask them, they are easily the most efficient people I've ever seen.
2013-01-12 01:53:35 PM
2 votes:

Tillmaster: Tu travailles dans un magasin, espèce de crapaud!

The author made a very good job of working the system, in the end. Very impressive.


Impressive? He could have simply bought the knife on his first trip. Or his second trip.

Instead he had to inconvenience some other customer in order to feel as if he had fooled some sales clerk.
2013-01-12 01:45:01 PM
2 votes:
Anybody else want to scream "You work in a shop, you arrogant little toad!" at people like that?
2013-01-13 02:50:29 AM
1 votes:

ChadM89: I'm a former professional chef, and I do damn near every last thing with my 10-inch Wustof chef's knife. Anything requiring fine precision or delicacy and I just go to the boning knife. Between those two knives I can do every bit of my cutting for any task.

For home cooks I recommend an 8-inch chef's knife. Spend the money for a quality knife, it makes a world of difference. I'm partial the the Wustof classic series. Buy a stone and steel and keep the knife sharp, and just use it for everything. Some things will feel awkward at first, but before long you'll wonder why you ever mucked around with all those crappy knives you used to use.


Word. My go-to is a Shun santuko...I thought initially 'who pays this much for a knife?' Now, I think 'who wouldn't'? I don't go for lots of kitchen gadgets, but a good knife (or two) is vital...
2013-01-12 10:32:50 PM
1 votes:

Aulus: I was in Paris the same time Jim Morrison died there, 1971.  I found no rudeness to me, a 22 year old, fresh out of college.  England was another matter.

About the best experience in Paris was when I met up with an Oxford grad and he intorduced me to Shakespeare & Company.  I farking loved that place.  I bought one book on arcahic Latin inscriptions and another, a collectioon of Sophocles' plays in Greek.  As I went to pay for them, the clerk, who was puffing away on a cigarette, unshaven, bad teeth and rumple, looked at my purchaces and asked in perfect English if I had learned my Greek at Cambridge, England or Cambridge, MA.  I answered back, "Neither.  I learned at Tallahassee, FL at Florida State."  He brightened right up and said, "Amazing!  My brother teaches across town at Florida A&M!"

Last year, I saw a news story.  That clerk was the owner and had just died.  His daughter, born in 1973, now runs the place.  I feel old.


Shakespeare & Company. Quite possibly my favorite book shop on the planet. I had an amazing discussion there with a total stranger for two hours, ranging over science and mythology and numerous other things that, when I'd left the shop with my purchases, made me happier than any discussion I'd had for a year previous. Good gads, 2005. I need to go back to Paris.
2013-01-12 08:21:57 PM
1 votes:

Pert: Been there. Bought a knife and a tagine. No attitude. Also found Paris very polite - was even offered a free second helping of carpaccio of beef in one restaurant.

/realise that is an Italian dish but that was on their set menu that day
//no, not tartare


I'm actually in Paris right now as I type this, on a weekend away from or home in Spain. While I never went into this store, I have found it to be a great city full of very friendly folks. I feel bad because while I know Spanish, and my wife knows Spanish and German for when we go there, neither of us speak a lick of French.

But the people are very patient, friendly to a fault, waiters are playful with my kids, and altogether opposite of every stereotype attributed to French people in America. I haven't even seen any mimes t be annoyed by. And I actually WANTED to see one dang it.
2013-01-12 03:51:58 PM
1 votes:
I want my 2 minutes back. That was like a child poorly telling a joke.
2013-01-12 03:37:56 PM
1 votes:

poe_zlaw: DuncanMhor: Anybody else want to scream "You work in a shop, you arrogant little toad frog!" at people like that?

over the line?


I find toad, or crapaud, to be a far more historically relevant insult.

/Maybe
2013-01-12 03:29:55 PM
1 votes:
France lost something like 2/3 of its total population of men during World War 1, it is a country and a culture raised by angry widowed women. And it shows.
2013-01-12 03:27:04 PM
1 votes:

Aidan: I've been told repeatedly that Americans find Canadians politeness to be offensive and suspicious because... well they've got to be hiding something, right!


I'm sorry you've had to deal with morons.
Not all Americans are farking sociopathic idiots, but there are enough of them.
2013-01-12 03:22:19 PM
1 votes:

Cyno01: Can you get by with just a chefs knife and a pairing knife? Sure, theyre pretty good at hundreds of things. If youre working at a fish place and slicing salmon day in, day out, might you want a special salmon knife? Probably


Exactly.

This is a place for people who make their living doing things like filleting salmon to buy the tools of their trade. If you're just a home cook, you'd be better off investing in one really good all-purpose chef's knife than wasting these professionals' time.

And if you've been told a certain knife's not designed for cutting roasts but you insist on buying it and using it for that purpose anyway... well, you're just an asshole.
2013-01-12 03:13:19 PM
1 votes:

Mock26: I would love to visit a store like that


Look for your nearby "Restaurant Supply" via Yelp or Google or whatever. The photos in TFA look like places near me.

It might be disappointing, depending on what you are looking for. Not gadgets, just plain-jane durable pots & pans & utensils. Kind of the anti-Williams Sonoma

Wait, your profile says you're in Chicago. Here's a couple of options:
Northwestern Cutlery Supply, 810 W Lake St, Chicago IL

Pierce Chef's Mart, 9685 West 55th Street Countryside, Illinois 60525
2013-01-12 03:00:15 PM
1 votes:
My "professional" knives are few. I have two hand made knives from Japan bought through a traveling salesman who takes orders, grip models, and delivers six months or so later. Just freaking awesome, as cheap as one of your high end consumer stores. I only use those as part of a "performance" job.

My everyday knives, believe it or not are older "Chicago Metallic" which were dirt cheap years ago. Between those and some cheap ceramic knives bought from Harbor Freight tools, ($8 with coupon) I have everything.
I do not use the ceramics for boning, but for anything that needs straight cuts, they work well.
2013-01-12 02:57:31 PM
1 votes:

DuncanMhor: lohphat: "Shops" make things on site, "stores" stock things made elsewhere.

Only if you're American. I'm not. "Shop" in the UK is a generic term for a place that sells something.


I'm an American and I've never heard or seen anyone being corrected on such a non-existent semantic point.

In the U.S. 'shop' is also a generic term for a place that sells something.
2013-01-12 02:46:15 PM
1 votes:
We went to Paris on our honeymoon. While I did expeience some of the traditional rudeness (and walked out of several shops and restaurants to spend my Francs elsewhere) I also met some wonderful folks who plied their trades out of passion rather than a desire for profit. The bakery in the latin quarter where the bakers greeted us warmly and ended up giving us samples of just about everything they had just to see us enjoy it, was awesome. Also the gallery owner who, seeing our enjoyment of her tiny space, invited us 'downstairs' into a labyrinth of studio spaces occupied by working artists, was one of the high points. There was a Japanese waiter at a sushi restaurant who, upon hearing it was our honeymoon, gave us a nice bottle of saki with his blessings. A record vendor at a stall beside the Seine who saw that I was looking for punk 45's told us to come back the next day and he'd have something really special. When we returned he had a small stack of Clash imports (well not for him but they were imports to us). It went on and on!
If you don't want to be treated like a tourist then don't act like a tourist.
2013-01-12 02:45:01 PM
1 votes:

prjindigo: "dented" knife?


avec dents.
2013-01-12 02:44:08 PM
1 votes:

DuncanMhor: Anybody else want to scream "You work in a shop, you arrogant little toad!" at people like that?


Aaaaaand we're that >.< close to a tipping thread.
2013-01-12 02:17:43 PM
1 votes:

DuncanMhor: Anybody else want to scream "You work in a shop store, you arrogant little toad!" at people like that?


FTFY

"Shops" make things on site, "stores" stock things made elsewhere.
2013-01-12 02:04:28 PM
1 votes:

Blackneto: The Parisian's appreciate rudeness? Well fark everything about that.


This is wholly ironic coming from an (assumed) American. I've been told repeatedly that Americans find Canadians politeness to be offensive and suspicious because... well they've got to be hiding something, right! They just insulted me to my face by apologizing! The nerve! Those bastards!

So.... Yeah. :)
2013-01-12 02:04:21 PM
1 votes:

jaytkay: They guy asked for of a knife was designed to cut roasts, and the clerk showed him a better choice.

ZOMG, how rude!


Hey, if I want to cut beef roasts with a fish knife, then by god I will.
2013-01-12 02:01:49 PM
1 votes:
Been there. Bought a knife and a tagine. No attitude. Also found Paris very polite - was even offered a free second helping of carpaccio of beef in one restaurant.

/realise that is an Italian dish but that was on their set menu that day
//no, not tartare
2013-01-12 01:59:17 PM
1 votes:

padraig: This shop is quite well known, but this store originally caters to professionals, not lollygagers who comes on a whim to browse at stuff. I'm supposed they are tired of the tourists who treat them as a tourist attraction. If you know what you want and ask them, they are easily the most efficient people I've ever seen.


This. Been there multiple times, was never treated rudely by an employee.
The busload of Japanese women moving through the cramped store in packs were a different story...
2013-01-12 01:49:00 PM
1 votes:
Tu travailles dans un magasin, espèce de crapaud!

The author made a very good job of working the system, in the end. Very impressive.
2013-01-12 01:46:40 PM
1 votes:

vudukungfu: DuncanMhor: Anybody else want to scream "You work in a shop, you arrogant little toad!" at people like that?

Only in French.


Yelling that in German would suffice, I think...
 
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