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(FX Cuisine)   Wannabe chef travels to Dehillerin, the 'Mecca for Chefs around the world' for centuries, and is promptly told he's a moron. Multiple times. And laughed at. By the staff. Guess the nation   (fxcuisine.com) divider line 125
    More: Obvious, Mecca, Dehillerin, saucepan, asparagus, canisters  
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20204 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Jan 2013 at 1:38 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-12 05:31:46 PM
I almost want this guy to go back and show off whatever cooking knowledge he knew all "Pretty Woman" style.
 
2013-01-12 05:37:12 PM
http://www.fark.com/users/Snarcoleptic_Hoosier
Please tell me you are not in the area of West Lafayette, In.
 
2013-01-12 05:38:42 PM
Oh and make sure to hold a chef's knife properly. Your index finger should be on the blade, forward of the bolster, with your thumb pinching the blade from the other side. A properly-made knife will be balanced at this point. When shopping, pinch the blade between the tips of your thumb and one finger near the top of the blade just forward of the bolster. The knife should remain level.
 
2013-01-12 05:47:41 PM

lohphat: DuncanMhor: Anybody else want to scream "You work in a shop store, you arrogant little toad!" at people like that?

FTFY

"Shops" make things on site, "stores" stock things made elsewhere.


Really? Cause I go shopping for groceries and I store things in a shed.
 
2013-01-12 05:49:10 PM
Snarcoleptic_Hoosier
Before I have to take the better two-thirds to her rental places in Versailles, Ky,
I will try and get in touch.
 
2013-01-12 05:55:07 PM

The My Little Pony Killer: I was quite disappointed but it became clear that they would not sell me the 'wrong' knife even if I insisted.

Sooo... he's mad that he couldn't get his way. Wah.


Frankly, it's none of their goddamn business what he wants to cut with that knife.  They misunderstand the nature of the relationship - they have stuff, customers buy stuff.  The End.  If I want to buy a salmon steak knife to use as a letter opener, that's my business.

I wonder what that asshole would have done if a customer said, "I use it to flay the thigh muscles from the bone before I put the body through the wood chipper"?
 
2013-01-12 06:09:51 PM

exvaxman: My mother used to go into that store. She was well known in the culinary world, but also would have to be really insulting to the staff right back until she got service. One of my memories was her telling me (in French, loudly)  that she was tired of the vermin, I was in charge of the usual insult dance. I pinned a salesman against the end of an isle, and started off with (the translation was "you f**king ketchup lover") and the man was providing service. He told me that it was the worst insult he ever heard from an American.


Tu es Belge, hein? Also works well...
 
2013-01-12 06:34:45 PM

orbister: ChubbyTiger: I found Paris and Parisians to be lovely. Not rude at all.

In most countries you get the level of rudeness back which you send out yourself. Waltz in to a shop or restaurant in France, Germany, Italy, Slovakia, Spain, (cont p94) and start demanding service in loud English without even an attempt to speak the local language and you'll get treated with disdain. Smile, say hello in the local language and follow their customs (don't hand money to German shopkeepers; that's what the small glass dish on the counter is for) and you'll be treated with respect and warmth.

The loud American tourist is an unpopular cliché. Unfortunate, too, because sensible people know that that most American tourists are pleasant people. Alas they, by definition, are not the ones who get the reputation.


This. Say hello in the local language, smile, and don't be a douche. Haven't gone wrong with that system yet.

/Paris is glorious
 
2013-01-12 06:38:45 PM
FTFA: They could put a large sign in English and French but they would miss the fun.

Except you're in France, and they speak French. This is probably why they hate you.
 
2013-01-12 06:41:47 PM

exvaxman: http://www.fark.com/users/Snarcoleptic_Hoosier
Please tell me you are not in the area of West Lafayette, In.


No, not in Wast Lafayette for me. The company I work for does have a branch there, but I'm in Evansville (city of 113K on the Ohio River - in the IN/KY/IL tristate area)

I'm not stupid enough to say where I work for, but the majority of the stores are outlet mall style and at least some of the floorspace is kitchen gadgets/home housewares. I'll buy a beer to any Farker that comes in to visit me.
 
2013-01-12 07:47:42 PM

cameroncrazy1984: steamingpile: No, he's right shops are where stuff is made and us usually proceeded by what they make, there is a difference

That's crap. There is no difference. Cheese shops don't necessarily make cheese.


He begs to differ:

upload.wikimedia.org

/would you like to come back to my place?
 
2013-01-12 08:21:57 PM

Pert: Been there. Bought a knife and a tagine. No attitude. Also found Paris very polite - was even offered a free second helping of carpaccio of beef in one restaurant.

/realise that is an Italian dish but that was on their set menu that day
//no, not tartare


I'm actually in Paris right now as I type this, on a weekend away from or home in Spain. While I never went into this store, I have found it to be a great city full of very friendly folks. I feel bad because while I know Spanish, and my wife knows Spanish and German for when we go there, neither of us speak a lick of French.

But the people are very patient, friendly to a fault, waiters are playful with my kids, and altogether opposite of every stereotype attributed to French people in America. I haven't even seen any mimes t be annoyed by. And I actually WANTED to see one dang it.
 
2013-01-12 09:46:56 PM
Florida?
 
2013-01-12 09:57:04 PM

vudukungfu: Smeggy Smurf: Chen Kinichi rarely used more than that one big knife. Why do foodies think they need more than a pro?

One chef's knife and a paring knife got me through 30 years of professional cooking.


So, which one did you use to open oysters?
 
2013-01-12 10:30:11 PM
When I was in Paris, I found it necessary to walk on a bar tab, because the bartender wouldn't even look at me for better than 3/4 of an hour, when he was engaged in a deep discussion of darts/football/buggery with his mates. I almost got away scot free, but slipped in the doorway and ended up on my ass. A nice lady helped me up, and I made a quick recovery and scuttled off into the foggy night. That night didn't end until after I marched around the Île de la Cité, and laughed off an aggressive little hooker in St. Germaine. Ah, Paris.
 
2013-01-12 10:32:50 PM

Aulus: I was in Paris the same time Jim Morrison died there, 1971.  I found no rudeness to me, a 22 year old, fresh out of college.  England was another matter.

About the best experience in Paris was when I met up with an Oxford grad and he intorduced me to Shakespeare & Company.  I farking loved that place.  I bought one book on arcahic Latin inscriptions and another, a collectioon of Sophocles' plays in Greek.  As I went to pay for them, the clerk, who was puffing away on a cigarette, unshaven, bad teeth and rumple, looked at my purchaces and asked in perfect English if I had learned my Greek at Cambridge, England or Cambridge, MA.  I answered back, "Neither.  I learned at Tallahassee, FL at Florida State."  He brightened right up and said, "Amazing!  My brother teaches across town at Florida A&M!"

Last year, I saw a news story.  That clerk was the owner and had just died.  His daughter, born in 1973, now runs the place.  I feel old.


Shakespeare & Company. Quite possibly my favorite book shop on the planet. I had an amazing discussion there with a total stranger for two hours, ranging over science and mythology and numerous other things that, when I'd left the shop with my purchases, made me happier than any discussion I'd had for a year previous. Good gads, 2005. I need to go back to Paris.
 
2013-01-13 12:58:53 AM

ReverendJasen: Aidan: I've been told repeatedly that Americans find Canadians politeness to be offensive and suspicious because... well they've got to be hiding something, right!

I'm sorry you've had to deal with morons.
Not all Americans are farking sociopathic idiots, but there are enough of them.


Considering I meant my husband, yeah, it's not that bad. :) Mostly he just says my (Canadian) apologies get up his back because they're clearly insincere/hiding something. He'd rather I told him to go fark himself. Like.. The French, I guess? :)
 
2013-01-13 01:27:53 AM

Cyno01: Smeggy Smurf: Chen Kinichi rarely used more than that one big knife. Why do foodies think they need more than a pro?

Because hes on a tv show in a kitchen with limited equipment cooking different things each time? Can you get by with just a chefs knife and a pairing knife? Sure, theyre pretty good at hundreds of things. If youre working at a fish place and slicing salmon day in, day out, might you want a special salmon knife? Probably. A pro wont have every knife in the world, but they might have a couple of those hundreds of specialized knives for things they do frequently,


I use a cleaver for almost everything. The only real reason I've come across for switching knives is to avoid cross contamination. Then I'll switch to my big chef's knife. You don't need a specialized knife, you need a sharp knife. The kind of sharp that cuts you to the bone from across the room for looking at it without the proper respect a sharp knife demands.
 
2013-01-13 02:50:29 AM

ChadM89: I'm a former professional chef, and I do damn near every last thing with my 10-inch Wustof chef's knife. Anything requiring fine precision or delicacy and I just go to the boning knife. Between those two knives I can do every bit of my cutting for any task.

For home cooks I recommend an 8-inch chef's knife. Spend the money for a quality knife, it makes a world of difference. I'm partial the the Wustof classic series. Buy a stone and steel and keep the knife sharp, and just use it for everything. Some things will feel awkward at first, but before long you'll wonder why you ever mucked around with all those crappy knives you used to use.


Word. My go-to is a Shun santuko...I thought initially 'who pays this much for a knife?' Now, I think 'who wouldn't'? I don't go for lots of kitchen gadgets, but a good knife (or two) is vital...
 
2013-01-13 02:55:52 AM

DuncanMhor: Anybody else want to scream "You work in a shop, you arrogant little toad!" at people like that?


No, I just short everything French and then stock my cellar with everything not French. It's working pretty well, if you peruse the latest figures.
 
2013-01-13 04:27:48 AM

Blackneto: Mock26: Nogale: Mock26: I would love to visit a store like that, as I love to cook and I am sure that they have a lot of things that I need that I would only need the moment I first saw it. Nor would I go in acting like some dumb-ass tourist. If, however, they treated me as such I would start taking pictures of items that I liked and when they asked why, I said I would but it at half the cost on the internet.

A lot of kitchen gadgets are superfluous, but you can never tell. When I moved into my current apartment I swung through IKEA to get some stuff and bought a set of two funnels (one large, one small) that was on sale for the equivalent of about 79 cents. I'd never had any call for funnels before, but now that I have them I use the damn things all the time. They've more than earned the drawer space they take up.

I know that they are superfluous, and I know that most of them will only ever get used a few times before winding up in the Drawer of Loneliness, but I still love kitchen gadgets. I also find that the few that I use a lot more than make up for those other ones that only collect dust.

The worst part is not remembering you have a particular gadget in the drawer and buying it, using it, then putting it into the drawer of loneliness with the old one.


I have three of a couple of items!
 
2013-01-13 05:48:32 AM

Aidan: Blackneto: The Parisian's appreciate rudeness? Well fark everything about that.

This is wholly ironic coming from an (assumed) American. I've been told repeatedly that Americans find Canadians politeness to be offensive and suspicious because... well they've got to be hiding something, right! They just insulted me to my face by apologizing! The nerve! Those bastards!

So.... Yeah. :)


But not from our lessors, like service employees! In fact, we should import Canadians to fill all of our service positions.
 
2013-01-13 10:32:15 AM
I got an Oxo knife block set for my engagement but I will be damned if anyone takes my Joyce Chen chef's knife.

My Mom bought this knife in the 80's sometime and it's the only one that fits my tiny hands perfectly.
 
2013-01-13 10:45:10 AM

ChadM89: I'm a former professional chef, and I do damn near every last thing with my 10-inch Wustof chef's knife. Anything requiring fine precision or delicacy and I just go to the boning knife. Between those two knives I can do every bit of my cutting for any task.

For home cooks I recommend an 8-inch chef's knife. Spend the money for a quality knife, it makes a world of difference. I'm partial the the Wustof classic series. Buy a stone and steel and keep the knife sharp, and just use it for everything. Some things will feel awkward at first, but before long you'll wonder why you ever mucked around with all those crappy knives you used to use.


This is almost word-for-word the post I was about to write. Former pro.

My 10" driedzackwerkz is going on 20 years old now. It now makes the food for my wife and 3 kids. I recieved an identical knife from my best friend as a wedding present 13 years ago. It's still in its bright-orange sleeve...untouched.
 
2013-01-13 10:56:22 AM

TwowheelinTim: vudukungfu: Smeggy Smurf: Chen Kinichi rarely used more than that one big knife. Why do foodies think they need more than a pro?

One chef's knife and a paring knife got me through 30 years of professional cooking.

So, which one did you use to open oysters?


Actually, you can use the thick spine of the 10" trident. Use the tip to seperate, then flip it over and knock the oyster down over the spine. I've done this before. Unless you're one of those mirror-glass-blade-finish guys.
 
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