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(CBC)   Good and bad news for Canadian Students: hard drive containing personal information about more than half a million people who received student loans has gone missing   (cbc.ca) divider line 31
    More: Interesting, Canadians, Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Gatineau  
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1790 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Jan 2013 at 3:30 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



31 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-01-11 11:28:23 PM
that was all on one hard drive?? where is the unlikely tag?
 
2013-01-11 11:54:52 PM
Yeah, the creditors have back ups.

some_beer_drinker: that was all on one hard drive?? where is the unlikely tag?


Text files are pretty low impact, memory wise.

The entire Wheel of Time, 14 volumes, more than 4 million words, is only a few megabytes.
 
2013-01-12 02:29:28 AM
How this should have played out...

Bob: Hey Joe, I lost my laptop with 500K student records on it
Joe: Your laptop had a corporate OS image, with full disk encryption and FOB token authentication enabled, right?
Bob: Yeah
Joe: Is your FOB in your pocket?
Bob: Yeah
Joe: Meh.  Pass me another beer.
 
2013-01-12 03:40:18 AM
hmmm, social insurance numbers, birthdates, etc... For the pain an suffering I am about to suffer from identity theft I will accept forgiveness of said student loan as compensation.
 
2013-01-12 03:58:06 AM

Dinjiin: How this should have played out...

Bob: Hey Joe, I lost my laptop with 500K student records on it
Joe: Your laptop had a corporate OS image, with full disk encryption and FOB token authentication enabled, right?
Bob: Yeah
Joe: Is your FOB in your pocket?
Bob: Yeah
Joe: Meh.  Pass me another beer.


While you're right practically, conceptually I think the point is larger. When electronic information is held in a single bucket (or duplicated across multiple buckets - think cloud), all it takes is a single breach by an individual bad actor for that data to be compromised. The one:many problem playing out in a big way.

Think about your medical records, for example. Some years ago, you'd have to go all Fletch in your search (essentially 1:1 intrusion - or if one:many, rather impractical to take/copy the contents of the entire medical records room in a single facility), Today, a motivated individual could gain access to the data of millions of people - and duplicate those data across any number of media nearly instantly (compared).

I'm no fan of the cloud in a lot of ways. This problem gets talked about a lot, but I don't think we (collectively) know what it means - or even understand the full implications of it. And in a broader sense, the one:many thing is orders of magnitude greater than any time in our recorded history. There's a lot to it, conceptually.
 
2013-01-12 04:00:19 AM

some_beer_drinker: that was all on one hard drive?? where is the unlikely tag?


Compression and terabyte hard drives, how do they work?
 
2013-01-12 04:08:29 AM

Xaneidolon: This problem gets talked about a lot, but I don't think we (collectively) know what it means - or even understand the full implications of it. And in a broader sense, the one:many thing is orders of magnitude greater than any time in our recorded history. There's a lot to it, conceptually.


Quit navel gazing. The cloud is just a library. It's neat that you can copy things fast, even automatically, but it's not a new experience. Even cavemen chieftains had this ability to say "sudo make me a copy" to their henchmen and get a copy made. Now it's faster and more people have henchmen, but it's the same concept.

Computer technology is merely change, not progress per se.
 
2013-01-12 04:14:15 AM
Surely the data is encrypted.
 
2013-01-12 04:22:46 AM
Hopefully for the students this is the only copy.
 
2013-01-12 04:32:10 AM
How is this good news, Failmitter?
 
2013-01-12 04:35:56 AM
Ha! My wife's information is useless! She was an art history major!!!
 
2013-01-12 04:56:34 AM
Please tell me this was encrypted.

But since it hit the headlines, guessing it wasn't.
 
2013-01-12 05:20:31 AM
Xaneidolon
2013-01-12 03:58:06 AM


"Joe: Is your FOB in your pocket?"


What is a "FOB"?

/ not tech smrt
 
2013-01-12 05:21:40 AM
I do not understand how this kind of stuff comes to be just laying around.
 
2013-01-12 05:23:38 AM
In non-tech terms, that's like a hardware key that unlocks software secrets. :)
 
2013-01-12 05:30:55 AM

gweilo8888: some_beer_drinker: that was all on one hard drive?? where is the unlikely tag?

Compression and terabyte hard drives, how do they work?


i mean, they kept all that data on only one drive? no back up?

but still, just as stupid.
 
2013-01-12 05:41:42 AM

some_beer_drinker: that was all on one hard drive?? where is the unlikely tag?


What do you find so unlikely about a few 100 KB worth of database entries and compressed scanned text documents (they developed /real/ good compression algorithms for scanned text back when a 1.44MB floppy was the new hotness) per student fitting on a drive that can hold terabytes of data?
 
2013-01-12 05:59:01 AM

Wolf892: I'm a Canadian with 20 grand in student loan debt...Right about now I'd love to hear that my student loan has been forgiven on the grounds that it just up and walked away....Sigh...I'd also like to win the 50 million lotto jackpot and do two chicks at the same time with their consent....


Heh.. I went to vet tech school from 2002 til early 2004, was told i'd have to repeat my entire 2nd yr Surgery because i'd missed too many labs due to my daughter getting sick. Said fark that and quit going. School has since been shut down for embezzlement, so i'm quite peeved about owing money on a loan that went to that. Hoping my info was amongst the lost as well.
 
2013-01-12 06:12:31 AM

some_beer_drinker: i mean, they kept all that data on only one drive? no back up?

but still, just as stupid.


Where does it say there was no backup?

More likely somebody pulled a copy of the file (or a part thereof) to take home for a report they were working on, or similar.
 
2013-01-12 06:36:34 AM

Dinjiin: How this should have played out...

Bob: Hey Joe, I lost my laptop with 500K student records on it
Joe: Your laptop had a corporate OS image, with full disk encryption and FOB token authentication enabled, right?
Bob: Yeah
Joe: Is your FOB in your pocket?
Bob: Yeah
Joe: Meh.  Pass me another beer.


This.

The thing that is so infuriating about this is "they" can still act like its solely on the individual to protect their own information, despite these huge and (relaltively) preventable data breeches. Im relatively tech savvy and absolutely paranoid. Yet Ive gotten 4 letters from 4 separate organizations that my data was on an unencrypted portable drive that got jacked. As an individual there was essentially nothing I could do about this (not having a bank account and not attending college is beneath consideration) Never gotten any letters about some uber 1337 hacker breaking elaborate security.
 
b3x
2013-01-12 07:50:39 AM

Xaneidolon: Dinjiin: How this should have played out...

Bob: Hey Joe, I lost my laptop with 500K student records on it
Joe: Your laptop had a corporate OS image, with full disk encryption and FOB token authentication enabled, right?
Bob: Yeah
Joe: Is your FOB in your pocket?
Bob: Yeah
Joe: Meh.  Pass me another beer.

While you're right practically, conceptually I think the point is larger. When electronic information is held in a single bucket (or duplicated across multiple buckets - think cloud), all it takes is a single breach by an individual bad actor for that data to be compromised. The one:many problem playing out in a big way.

Think about your medical records, for example. Some years ago, you'd have to go all Fletch in your search (essentially 1:1 intrusion - or if one:many, rather impractical to take/copy the contents of the entire medical records room in a single facility), Today, a motivated individual could gain access to the data of millions of people - and duplicate those data across any number of media nearly instantly (compared).

I'm no fan of the cloud in a lot of ways. This problem gets talked about a lot, but I don't think we (collectively) know what it means - or even understand the full implications of it. And in a broader sense, the one:many thing is orders of magnitude greater than any time in our recorded history. There's a lot to it, conceptually.


The fact is that if they are using such antiquated technology that the entire database (or even a large dataset) needs to be copied locally to be usuable ... then chances are they are not using encryption on the drives. The fact is , most large institutions are horribly insufficient as far as technology is concerned, because the vast majority of their employees are tech ignorant
 
2013-01-12 08:49:39 AM
Seriously? what governmental(emphasis on the MENTAL) department decided it was OK to use portable flash drives? If it was a flash drive with built-in encryption hardware that would nuke the drive after so many fails, I wouldn't be to concerned. However it was probably you average flash drive that gets handed out like candy. Jaysus sufferin fook, to those Canadian Farkers possibly affected by this, I say get yerself a good lawyer, and go after the bastards.

As My Herniated Disk stated "hmmm, social insurance numbers, birthdates, etc... For the pain an suffering I am about to suffer from identity theft I will accept forgiveness of said student loan as compensation."
 
2013-01-12 09:00:36 AM
Nice they waited THREE FREAKING MONTHS to tell people.

Incompetent boobs. Gotta protect the Harperbot and his dark army at all costs.
 
2013-01-12 09:32:56 AM
Hmmm. That would seem to line up with the strange phone calls I started receiving from a supposed creditor(my only loans - ever - are gov't-owned student ones, and they are maintained, as I'm pretty compulsive about refusing to engage in debt) who could not properly question me about my address history.
Yeah, that was a quick ignore.
 
2013-01-12 10:47:51 AM
Assuming my data was on this, was just at the tail end (05-06) for government loans. I had to go through my bank with lines of credit for my undergrad. Definitely going to be keeping an eye on things. Might be a good idea to pay out for one of those credit monitoring services, make sure nothing gets applied for in my name
 
2013-01-12 01:08:47 PM
This is why there should be some sort of contract where if someone is responsible for people's personal information loses it, their personal information should be released to the public. Your SIN, Credit card numbers and purchase history, banking information, blood type, everything. If you don't take others' personal information seriously you should enjoy the same raping they are potentially going to receive. I would love someone to hack Diane Finley's personal information and leak it because of this.

Funny how things don't get lost when personal accountability is reinforced.
 
2013-01-12 01:48:42 PM

Just another Heartland Weirdass: Yet Ive gotten 4 letters from 4 separate organizations that my data was on an unencrypted portable drive that got jacked.


My laptop won't let me write to any drive unless it is encrypted.  Doesn't matter if it is connected to the eSATA, USB or Firewire port.  It'll pop up a warning then mount them as read-only.  Which IMHO is how it should work.

Whenever I read about these thumb drives with tons of unencrypted data that grow legs and walk away, I shake my head.


b3x: because the vast majority of their employees are tech ignorant


Then you don't leave the IT up to the end user.  You have some sort of corporate policy server with appropriate security clients installed to enforce it.  They can be as ignorant as they want since they'll be sand-boxed in.


Xaneidolon: When electronic information is held in a single bucket (or duplicated across multiple buckets - think cloud), all it takes is a single breach by an individual bad actor for that data to be compromised.


Yup.  If it becomes easier for the good guys to access, it becomes easier for the bad guys to access.  And many small companies just don't have the IT staff, the desire or the budget to put the appropriate safeguards into place.  The good thing is that more and more data security laws are being passed, so eventually they won't have a choice.

My big worry about the cloud is not in data storage, but in computational power.  Even if a drive is encrypted, if the encryption is weak, you just throw it at a cloud processor and brute force it for a few days.  So you always have to be mindful that you're using somewhat up-to-date software to protect things.
 
2013-01-12 02:37:51 PM
>> Borrowers from Quebec, Nunavut and the Northwest Territories are not affected.

So, only English speakers were affected?
Move along; nothing to see here.
 
2013-01-12 05:30:48 PM

NavyDavy: >> Borrowers from Quebec, Nunavut and the Northwest Territories are not affected.

So, only English speakers were affected?
Move along; nothing to see here.


Because no one speaks French in Ontario and Nova Scotia?
 
2013-01-13 03:10:57 AM

change1211: NavyDavy: >> Borrowers from Quebec, Nunavut and the Northwest Territories are not affected.

So, only English speakers were affected?
Move along; nothing to see here.

Because no one speaks French in Ontario and Nova Scotia?


I'm not sure anyone speaks English in BC, as much as we do get along with our polyglot of languages - and what the fark is that gibberish they use in NFLD anyway?
 
2013-01-13 04:24:26 PM

starsrift: change1211: NavyDavy: >> Borrowers from Quebec, Nunavut and the Northwest Territories are not affected.

So, only English speakers were affected?
Move along; nothing to see here.

Because no one speaks French in Ontario and Nova Scotia?

I'm not sure anyone speaks English in BC, as much as we do get along with our polyglot of languages - and what the fark is that gibberish they use in NFLD anyway?


Hell if I know. There are a few Newfies at my work and when they are talking to each other they might as well be speaking Swahili. (pops)
 
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