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(WTKR)   Workers renovating TV station find newspaper stuffed inside wall from October 3, 1949. Pics will give you younger Farkers a lesson in dead historical figures like Stalin, Joe Louis, newspapers   (wtkr.com) divider line 34
    More: Cool, historical figure  
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10081 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Jan 2013 at 9:43 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-11 09:46:05 AM  
Old newspapers aren't exactly hard to find, hoardmitter
 
2013-01-11 09:46:53 AM  
And a few years back I found a paper from May 1927 underneath a really old bathtub. Where's my news article?
 
2013-01-11 09:48:40 AM  
Used to do this when I worked construction. Except with mine, 50 years from now people will find empty 32 oz malt liquor cans, empty cigarette packs and porn mags.
 
2013-01-11 09:48:58 AM  
Workers find trash in walls, news at 11.
 
2013-01-11 09:52:51 AM  
I second that. Hell, I have several National Geographics in my possession from the 30s.

Also, if you don't need an actual dead-tree copy, you can go to the microfilm section of any large library and find old newspapers on microfilm. When I was a (geeky) kid, I'd go look up old papers from famous historical eras.

My absolute favorite was the first half of August 1945. Headlines were about the latest Japanese city getting firebombed, the aftermath of the war in Europe, and a WWII ace named Bong (I kid you not) getting killed testing a P-80 experimental jet plane. Then, suddenly, "SUPERBOMB SMASHES JAP CITY" with a hell of a lot of articles about how the secretive Manhattan Project was in a hidden race with the Nazis to develop the atomic bomb. What's really freaky is that, right from the get-go, people seemed to know that history had changed forever. There were plenty of editorials about how we've opened Pandora's Box forever or something along those lines, along with one or two optimistic opinions that war would be erased forever because it was now too dangerous. I get the feeling that the cultural shock of entering the Atomic Era was far greater than anything Americans experienced in the 60s...
 
2013-01-11 09:58:41 AM  

Psycat: Also, if you don't need an actual dead-tree copy, you can go to the microfilm section of any large library and find old newspapers on microfilm. When I was a (geeky) kid, I'd go look up old papers from famous historical eras.


http://news.google.com/newspapers
 
2013-01-11 09:59:51 AM  
i106.photobucket.com
 
2013-01-11 10:01:47 AM  

Psycat: Also, if you don't need an actual dead-tree copy, you can go to the microfilm section of any large library and find old newspapers on microfilm.


The microfilms (and now digital versions from the microfilms in many cases) will also be readable, unlike whatever uncle Joe stashed away in his attic.

I think the best way to get over any hoarding instinct is to visit any University research library with an 'offsite storage facility'. 30-foot-tall shelves that you need a skyjack for, Raiders Of the Lost Ark size caverns, everything barcoded and sorted by size for highest density.

There's mind-boggling amounts of information out there. I'll save my family photos or whatever, but if someone wants to know what was in the Brownsville Thrifty Trader in 1972, that's not my problem.
 
2013-01-11 10:02:27 AM  
 
2013-01-11 10:03:18 AM  

moothemagiccow: Psycat: Also, if you don't need an actual dead-tree copy, you can go to the microfilm section of any large library and find old newspapers on microfilm. When I was a (geeky) kid, I'd go look up old papers from famous historical eras.

http://news.google.com/newspapers


Wow, didn't know Google had newspaper archives. Thanks for the link!
 
2013-01-11 10:07:47 AM  

Petey4335: Psycat: and a WWII ace named Bong

That is Richard Ira "Dick" Bong to you, buddy.


Didn't he make a movie with Ronald Reagan named Bedtime for Bong-o?
 
2013-01-11 10:19:51 AM  

Lawnchair: Psycat: Also, if you don't need an actual dead-tree copy, you can go to the microfilm section of any large library and find old newspapers on microfilm.

The microfilms (and now digital versions from the microfilms in many cases) will also be readable, unlike whatever uncle Joe stashed away in his attic.

I think the best way to get over any hoarding instinct is to visit any University research library with an 'offsite storage facility'. 30-foot-tall shelves that you need a skyjack for, Raiders Of the Lost Ark size caverns, everything barcoded and sorted by size for highest density.

There's mind-boggling amounts of information out there. I'll save my family photos or whatever, but if someone wants to know what was in the Brownsville Thrifty Trader in 1972, that's not my problem.


I've been through the stacks at the various libraries at the University of Minnesota, and it's staggering what they have in storage. In the Wilson Library, they have bound volumes of old magazines--not just Time or Newsweek, but weird old stuff like a short-lived Finnish sailing magazine from the 30s. I wonder how much of this stuff will ever get digitized.

Slightly off-topic: when I was a kid in the 70s, there wasn't much access to classic silent slapstick. The Central Saint Paul library had a small collection of Blackhawk 8mm films that included many silents. Other than that, there were the Robert Youngson (?) compilations which were a good intro to silent slapstick, but they were heavily edited with the intertitles removed and replaced with narration. And, maybe if you were very lucky, once or twice a year, a local station would show an old silent on the Late, Late, Late, Late Show at 1 AM right before sign-off.

Nowadays, there's an embarrassment of riches. Between the Internet Archive, YouTube, and collections of films on DVD, there's more silent slapstick than I can handle. I've heard the figure of 90% of all silent films have disintegrated over the years, but I wonder if that's an accurate number: all of Chaplin's films with one or two exceptions, have survived, along with nearly all silent Keaton and Lloyd films (minus the early Lonesome Lukes). What's happening, I think, is that film archives have discovered that digitizing their collections is a lot cheaper than making a 35 mm copy. (Yes, a 35 mm archival copy is the best, but digitizing is probably the most practical considering the tiny budgets of film archives...)

But I digress...
 
2013-01-11 10:31:09 AM  
The house I grew up in was insulated with newspapers from the early 1920's. It was interesting for about an hour - then it was back to matchbox cars...
 
2013-01-11 10:33:52 AM  
 
2013-01-11 10:42:39 AM  

Lawnchair: I think the best way to get over any hoarding instinct is to visit any University research library with an 'offsite storage facility'. 30-foot-tall shelves that you need a skyjack for, Raiders Of the Lost Ark size caverns, everything barcoded and sorted by size for highest density.


This is a skyjacking! Take me to your Cuban newspapers from June 1935!
 
2013-01-11 10:44:33 AM  
headline: "...joe louis"

thread: lack of photos/quotes from barber shop in "coming to america"

son: i am dissappoint

/can't post pics here at work, don't feel like quoting
//let your soul glow
 
2013-01-11 11:06:29 AM  
i208.photobucket.com
/recycled like old newspaper
 
2013-01-11 11:07:35 AM  
And they actually HAD the paper in question in "pristine" condition from the library.

So, they found a 50 year old newspaper in a wall?  Unless it is one that for some reason there was no other copies of and it was somehow significant... WTF cares.
 
2013-01-11 12:31:20 PM  
My work keeps me in touch with old newspapers every day. It's like a slightly distorted time warp ... some of the stuff is the usual that you'd see today, but then you find a racial reference or label that would be intolerable today.

When newspapers were the primary source for what's happening in a small town, 50-75 years ago, the volume and variety of news was staggering - who was ill or injured, who attended parties, meetings, conferences, etc. It had a Facebooky, Twitterish feel to it.
 
2013-01-11 12:35:36 PM  

Psycat: moothemagiccow: Psycat: Also, if you don't need an actual dead-tree copy, you can go to the microfilm section of any large library and find old newspapers on microfilm. When I was a (geeky) kid, I'd go look up old papers from famous historical eras.

http://news.google.com/newspapers

Wow, didn't know Google had newspaper archives. Thanks for the link!


I constantly use them. It's great to show people that we've always been the same, there hasn't been a rise in mass murders or suicides, people just have easier access to the news now.
 
2013-01-11 12:55:29 PM  

Mr.Hawk: Used to do this when I worked construction. Except with mine, 50 years from now people will find empty 32 oz malt liquor cans, empty cigarette packs and porn mags.


When it happens, you'll see it on Fark.
 
2013-01-11 12:58:50 PM  

Psycat: I second that. Hell, I have several National Geographics in my possession from the 30s.

Also, if you don't need an actual dead-tree copy, you can go to the microfilm section of any large library and find old newspapers on microfilm. When I was a (geeky) kid, I'd go look up old papers from famous historical eras.

My absolute favorite was the first half of August 1945. Headlines were about the latest Japanese city getting firebombed, the aftermath of the war in Europe, and a WWII ace named Bong (I kid you not) getting killed testing a P-80 experimental jet plane. Then, suddenly, "SUPERBOMB SMASHES JAP CITY" with a hell of a lot of articles about how the secretive Manhattan Project was in a hidden race with the Nazis to develop the atomic bomb. What's really freaky is that, right from the get-go, people seemed to know that history had changed forever. There were plenty of editorials about how we've opened Pandora's Box forever or something along those lines, along with one or two optimistic opinions that war would be erased forever because it was now too dangerous. I get the feeling that the cultural shock of entering the Atomic Era was far greater than anything Americans experienced in the 60s...


Ah, yes, but then all fear was allayed by Our Friend the Atom. Link

//made of atoms
 
2013-01-11 01:00:54 PM  

Rufus Lee King: [www.realclassicads.com image 400x295]


I wouldn't mind having one of those.

//except for the incredibly unsafe design, poor handling, low gas mileage, and short engine life
 
2013-01-11 01:12:50 PM  

Raoul Eaton: Mr.Hawk: Used to do this when I worked construction. Except with mine, 50 years from now people will find empty 32 oz malt liquor cans, empty cigarette packs and porn mags.

When it happens, you'll see it on Fark.


Finally something to look forward to?
 
2013-01-11 01:59:45 PM  
I was on a BART train a few months ago and I found an issue of Watchtower from 1988. Do I get an interview from the local TV station?

And who leaves a 25 year old Jehovah's witness magazine on a subway car seat?
Amusingly enough, the main articles were about the dangers of the Soviet Union and intl communism.
 
2013-01-11 02:30:11 PM  

SirEattonHogg: I was on a BART train a few months ago and I found an issue of Watchtower from 1988. Do I get an interview from the local TV station?

And who leaves a 25 year old Jehovah's witness magazine on a subway car seat?
Amusingly enough, the main articles were about the dangers of the Soviet Union and intl communism.


70s would have been better. You could have read about how the end of the world was months away.

// Sadly, my mom is in that cult.
 
2013-01-11 02:45:00 PM  
I'm not going to enable 20 scripts to look at a random old newspaper.
 
2013-01-11 02:55:56 PM  
One moment I remember in doing some research was a 'Letter to the Editor' (Ottawa Citizen, I think) from 1945 talking about the dangers of drunk driving and how something should be done. Seems "MADD" was quite a novel as they thought.
 
2013-01-11 04:00:03 PM  

mexican bathtub cheese: I'm not going to enable 20 scripts to look at a random old newspaper.


Just roll some more tinfoil on the keyboard. It'll be ok.
 
2013-01-11 04:39:18 PM  

ObscureNameHere: One moment I remember in doing some research was a 'Letter to the Editor' (Ottawa Citizen, I think) from 1945 talking about the dangers of drunk driving and how something should be done. Seems "MADD" was quite a novel as they thought.


Here's an article about a drunk driving cover up from 100 years ago today Link yeah I know thats about a train but you can find stories about drunk driving in autos from the time cars went on the market and people actually went to jail for driving drunk in the early days.
 
2013-01-11 05:03:10 PM  
Wow, in a country of 305,000,000 people, we are back to daily WTKR3 Norfolk articles again? I'm so flattered we are so special here. If only 5% of mainpage submissions are green-lit, how is it that subby gets one almost daily, sometimes more than one in a day? I was told there would be no math, but I'm guessing one would have to submit 20 articles a day, or be a bedfellow with a mod. There, I said it.  SHENANIGANS. Who is the Norfolk-mitter? And why should I care? Because he's like a hoarder of greenlights.
 
2013-01-11 05:45:49 PM  
Reminds me of when we were renovating a house I used to live in back when I was in high school, underneath the floor-boards of my bedroom were a bunch of old newspapers, to include one with the headline of BERIA OUT, with his picture with a big "X" through it beneath the headline (Beria being one of the most reprehensible human beings in history, Lavrenti Beria, Stalin's chief secret policeman and spy, as well as being a kidnapping pedophile and sadistic murderer). And it was cool seeing what car prices were like back in 1953 (a brand-new Oldsmobile was in the $2500 range).
 
2013-01-11 06:51:26 PM  
No renovations on a building used 24 hours a day since 1949?

/this business ain't what it used to be.
// also LOL @ taking action and getting results. neither are your job as a journalist.
 
2013-01-11 08:26:02 PM  
The woodshed at an old farm my Father bought was wallpapered with years of old newspapers--headlines from WWII and earlier.

I pulled an ad for a $500 Packard off of one wall (cool 1930s vintage touring car but not very well suspended--hold on to your hats, ladies, it's going to be a bumpy ride!). On the other side was a story about a Mexican guy who sat up in his coffin during his funeral. That happened more often before embalming. It was hard to tell a coma from death.

A lot of old newspapers were lost when libraries threw them out in the 1970s and 1980s. Very short-sighted of them. A century or two of genealogical and often archival-quality historical data lost, not to mention the bad poetry and advertisements. Some of this stuff were microfilmed before destruction, but not a lot compared to what was lost in hundreds of thousands of small town, rural and urban libraries.
 
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