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(Time)   Why Bill's Gay Nineties and other iconic, longstanding food and drink establishments are suffering in the gay 2010s   (ideas.time.com) divider line 17
    More: Sad, Bill Gay Nineties, Charlie Trotter  
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1862 clicks; posted to Business » on 10 Jan 2013 at 11:32 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



17 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-01-10 10:22:34 AM
I'm betting that there is some place old and wonderful in your town that went under this year, too.

People's tastes change. My grandparents think turkey and peas is the height of culinary excellence.
 
2013-01-10 11:41:06 AM
Adapt or die. No business has a "right" to exist
 
2013-01-10 11:58:40 AM
In other news, there are a farkload of other restaurants to eat at. Yes, even ones that don't make you pay first and feature a big lighted menu.
 
2013-01-10 12:02:29 PM
WTF is this guy talking about.  For a food writer this is pathetic.  My mom is hipper than this.


While gastrocrats continue to support supper high-end tweezer-food palaces  the middle-of-the-road places have been hit hard by the recession.

Dude, it's been farm-to-table and street food for about 3 years now.  HIgh-end tweezer dining (WTF that is) is as popular as Ruby Tuesday.

Just this past year, three big players in the great barbecue boom of 2006 all went under within a few months of each other.

Yeah, I can't believe that chain BBQ bit the dust.

When this happens to long-lived bars and diners and restaurants -places that loom large in our day-to-day public life - we really stand in danger of losing who we are. Imagine a country where every Irish bar a "Tipsy McStaggers"-type concept, where the 75-year-old diner you went to in high school had been replaced by a "Fifties diner" complete with neon Elvis and Marilyn Monroe images. Personally, I'd rather live in the Yukon. But that's just me.

Wait.  You just biatched about chains closing and now you're too cool for chains.  I can't take you seriously.
 
2013-01-10 12:11:40 PM
Stop changing! Stop liking things he doesn't like! Waah they took away that restaurant I kind of liked that I went to that one time and now the world is losing culture or shared collective memory. Someone stop this!

Restaurants go under. The third or fourth generation may not actually want to run a restaurant! Maybe the finances didn't work for a full service non-tweezer-food-palace. Maybe that's what people want.. but nope, change is bad because he doesn't like it.
 
2013-01-10 12:20:15 PM
Also, Midtown isn't an eating destination for New Yorkers any more. It used to be THE place for a fancy or fun night out, but now everyone goes downtown. Midtown food is more geared for tourists, and Bill's just doesn't cater to that crowd really.

If Bill's were in UES or UWS, it would have lasted a lot longer I think. That's where you open a restaurant that caters to more regulars, not in Midtown.
 
2013-01-10 12:38:18 PM
FTFA I don't have a solution for this problem. Old restaurants tend to be fixed in their ways, and frequently have customers as old as themselves. The market is cruel, and tends to leave its dead by the side of the road.

What an idiot.  The solution to the problem is adapt or die biatches.  I'm not seeing a problem here.
 
2013-01-10 12:49:48 PM
Never heard of "Bill's Gay Nineties" and it doesn't sound like a place I'd want to eat at, even if it sounds fabulous.
 
2013-01-10 01:09:19 PM

LesserEvil: Never heard of "Bill's Gay Nineties" and it doesn't sound like a place I'd want to eat at, even if it sounds fabulous.


I know.

I went there looking for a nice sandwich and a blowjob from a young man with a fade haircut and hammer pants, and all I got was a sandwich.

/and it was terrible.
 
2013-01-10 01:26:04 PM
Okay, I'll be a contrarian -- I liked the article, and spent the most of the following hour reading other Josh Ozersky columns.
 
2013-01-10 01:33:50 PM

phaseolus: Okay, I'll be a contrarian -- I liked the article, and spent the most of the following hour reading other Josh Ozersky columns.


You are the 1%
 
2013-01-10 02:34:06 PM

Rapmaster2000: Dude, it's been farm-to-table and street food for about 3 years now.


and that is rapidly becoming tail-to-snout... at least here in SF it is. We have plenty of old school restaurants around here and they aren't in danger of closing their doors. They know how to cater to a changing crowd though.
 
2013-01-10 02:50:40 PM

FirstNationalBastard: LesserEvil: Never heard of "Bill's Gay Nineties" and it doesn't sound like a place I'd want to eat at, even if it sounds fabulous.

I know.

I went there looking for a nice sandwich and a blowjob from a young man with a fade haircut and hammer pants, and all I got was a sandwich.

/and it was terrible.


You were looking for this place:

farm1.static.flickr.com

Easy mistake to make
 
2013-01-10 03:50:06 PM

idsfa: FirstNationalBastard: LesserEvil: Never heard of "Bill's Gay Nineties" and it doesn't sound like a place I'd want to eat at, even if it sounds fabulous.

I know.

I went there looking for a nice sandwich and a blowjob from a young man with a fade haircut and hammer pants, and all I got was a sandwich.

/and it was terrible.

You were looking for this place:

[farm1.static.flickr.com image 500x375]

Easy mistake to make


Now that IS the place you would find a BJ in the back room.
(or so I've heard)

/ whistles, while walking away
 
2013-01-10 04:18:55 PM
more and more of these long standing Iconic places will continue to fall by the wayside as the baby boomers that have supported them die off.
 
2013-01-10 06:04:49 PM

Rapmaster2000: Dude, it's been farm-to-table and street food for about 3 years now. HIgh-end tweezer dining (WTF that is) is as popular as Ruby Tuesday.


The concepts of farm-to-table and street food are popular, but are exceedingly popular (almost a requirement) in high-end restaurants where you get an appetizer sized portion on a dish the size of a DirecTV satellite. See those organic field greens (all three in the bowl)? Raised in an URBAN FARM (also known as a growhouse) in Brooklyn. That will be $27, please.

Yeah, I can't believe that chain BBQ bit the dust.

That was used as an example of how novelty is king in the restaurant business, instead of longtime establishments. BBQ was everywhere a few years back, especially here in DC, where trends take about two years to show up. All of a sudden, it's old hat. Now it's craft beer and craft cocktails made by "mixologists".

Wait. You just biatched about chains closing and now you're too cool for chains. I can't take you seriously.

He biatched about how BBQ became such a huge thing based on its novelty that it gave rise and subsequent fall to three large chains. I don't think the author has something against chains specifically.
 
2013-01-10 08:06:46 PM
this country is ghey now.
 
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