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(Independent)   Do you like musicals?   (independent.co.uk) divider line 35
    More: Weird, American Psycho, jazz hands, musicals, Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, Spring Awakening, Bret Easton Ellis, rock musical, artistic director  
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2491 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 10 Jan 2013 at 3:40 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-09 10:29:11 PM  
I have all the characteristics of a human being: blood, flesh, skin, hair; but not a single, clear, identifiable emotion, except for greed and disgust. Something horrible is happening inside of me and I don't know why. My nightly bloodlust has overflown into my days. I feel lethal, on the verge of frenzy. I think my mask of sanity is about to slip.
 
2013-01-09 10:33:57 PM  
I do.  I really really do.

Carrie Redux?

I feel like I could write the lyrics in my sleep.  I already feel like I have "The Heft Of One's Card" on the broiler.

- Call me.
 
2013-01-09 11:32:24 PM  
Do you like movies about gladiators?
 
2013-01-09 11:45:31 PM  
Do you like George Wendt?
 
2013-01-10 01:09:05 AM  
Do you shave your chest?
 
2013-01-10 03:49:12 AM  
Good luck, we're all counting on you.
 
ecl
2013-01-10 03:57:00 AM  
There are no more barriers to cross. All I have in common with the uncontrollable and the insane, the vicious and the evil, all the mayhem I have caused and my utter indifference toward it I have now surpassed. My pain is constant and sharp, and I do not hope for a better world for anyone. In fact, I want my pain to be inflicted on others. I want no one to escape. But even after admitting this, there is no catharsis; my punishment continues to elude me, and I gain no deeper knowledge of myself. No new knowledge can be extracted from my telling. This confession has meant nothing.
 
2013-01-10 05:02:15 AM  
media.cinemasquid.com

♫♬ ♫♬ Peepin' through the knot-hole
Of Grandpa's wooden leg
Who'll wind the clock
When I am gone?
Go get the ax
There's a flea in Lizzie's ear
And a boy's best friend is his mother. ♫♬ ♫♬ ♫♬
 
2013-01-10 07:25:59 AM  
The sign of the ultimate hack is to make a musical out something unconventional for musicals. This is a stupid idea high schoolers come up with for a few minutes and move on. It's like Abraham Lincoln, Vampire Hunter (since there have already been many other 'vampire hunter's) and Hansel and Gretal witch hunter. Our writers and entertainers are on empty.
 
2013-01-10 07:31:50 AM  
Sure, I love formulaic entertainment targeted specifically at gay men, old women and young girls.
 
2013-01-10 07:41:59 AM  
No. I'm someone who doesn't make out lyrics very well, so I miss huge chunks of plot.
 
2013-01-10 08:04:49 AM  

Nemo's Brother: The sign of the ultimate hack is to make a musical out something unconventional for musicals. This is a stupid idea high schoolers come up with for a few minutes and move on. It's like Abraham Lincoln, Vampire Hunter (since there have already been many other 'vampire hunter's) and Hansel and Gretal witch hunter. Our writers and entertainers are on empty.


What about this idea is unconventional? It sounds pretty typical to me. Sort of pedestrian and common really. Something for the tourists.
 
2013-01-10 08:14:33 AM  
I've been a big Rodgers and Hammerstein fan ever since the debut of their 1949 production, South Pacific. Before that, I really didn't understand any of their work. Too artsy, too intellectual. It was on South Pacific where Hammerstein's presence became more apparent. I think Sound Of Music was the group's undisputed masterpiece. It's an epic meditation on intangibility and Nazis.
 
2013-01-10 08:33:22 AM  

SockMonkeyHolocaust: Sure, I love formulaic entertainment targeted specifically at gay men, old women and young girls.


Shut up, moron.
 
2013-01-10 08:49:59 AM  
Does watching strippers perform count as "musicals"? If not then No,
 
2013-01-10 09:14:27 AM  
I'd go as long as it doesn't interfere with my reservation at Dorsia.
 
2013-01-10 09:43:31 AM  
www.moviesaboutgladiators.com
 
2013-01-10 10:04:50 AM  

Nemo's Brother: The sign of the ultimate hack is to make a musical out something unconventional for musicals.


I know...right?

Like a musical based on a 1,200 page epic novel about post-revolutionary Frace.

Or a based on a century-old urban legend about a barber who becomes a serial killer and whose neighbor processes the corpses into meat pies.

Or based on a crappy 1960s Roger Corman movie about a plant that drinks blood.

Or about the short life the glamorous wife of a Agentinian dictator.

Or a couple of Mormon missionaries that get send to Uganda.

Or a musical using all Abba songs about a young woman who finds out her mother was a total whore.

/okay, that last one was a total hack job.
 
2013-01-10 10:06:16 AM  
I have to return some videotapes.
 
2013-01-10 10:10:18 AM  

Primitive Screwhead: I've been a big Rodgers and Hammerstein fan ever since the debut of their 1949 production, South Pacific. Before that, I really didn't understand any of their work. Too artsy, too intellectual. It was on South Pacific where Hammerstein's presence became more apparent. I think Sound Of Music was the group's undisputed masterpiece. It's an epic meditation on intangibility and Nazis.


Nazis? It's set in the South Pacific theater where we were fighting the Japanese, not the Nazis.

Personally, I far prefer Rogers and Hart to Rogers and Hammerstein. Hammerstein dropped moral lesson anvils on the audiences' heads. In South Pacific, we learn all about how we have to be taught to hate. (Yet, the hero is conveniently stopped from getting together with his brown girlfriend on account of death. The heroine does get together with her white, European boyfriend, even though he has brown children. But at least there will be no brown hands to sully the flower of white womanhood, eh?) In Sound of Music, we get "maybe the flag with the black spider on it makes people nervous."
 
2013-01-10 10:17:29 AM  

DeaH: Primitive Screwhead: I've been a big Rodgers and Hammerstein fan ever since the debut of their 1949 production, South Pacific. Before that, I really didn't understand any of their work. Too artsy, too intellectual. It was on South Pacific where Hammerstein's presence became more apparent. I think Sound Of Music was the group's undisputed masterpiece. It's an epic meditation on intangibility and Nazis.

Nazis? It's set in the South Pacific theater where we were fighting the Japanese, not the Nazis.

Personally, I far prefer Rogers and Hart to Rogers and Hammerstein. Hammerstein dropped moral lesson anvils on the audiences' heads. In South Pacific, we learn all about how we have to be taught to hate. (Yet, the hero is conveniently stopped from getting together with his brown girlfriend on account of death. The heroine does get together with her white, European boyfriend, even though he has brown children. But at least there will be no brown hands to sully the flower of white womanhood, eh?) In Sound of Music, we get "maybe the flag with the black spider on it makes people nervous."


You guys don't make musicals sound very entertaining. I'll stick to watching strippers
 
2013-01-10 10:19:51 AM  

DeaH: Primitive Screwhead: I've been a big Rodgers and Hammerstein fan ever since the debut of their 1949 production, South Pacific. Before that, I really didn't understand any of their work. Too artsy, too intellectual. It was on South Pacific where Hammerstein's presence became more apparent. I think Sound Of Music was the group's undisputed masterpiece. It's an epic meditation on intangibility and Nazis.

Nazis? It's set in the South Pacific theater where we were fighting the Japanese, not the Nazis.

Personally, I far prefer Rogers and Hart to Rogers and Hammerstein. Hammerstein dropped moral lesson anvils on the audiences' heads. In South Pacific, we learn all about how we have to be taught to hate. (Yet, the hero is conveniently stopped from getting together with his brown girlfriend on account of death. The heroine does get together with her white, European boyfriend, even though he has brown children. But at least there will be no brown hands to sully the flower of white womanhood, eh?) In Sound of Music, we get "maybe the flag with the black spider on it makes people nervous."


Also : Link (NSFW)
 
2013-01-10 10:34:15 AM  

Primitive Screwhead: I've been a big Rodgers and Hammerstein fan ever since the debut of their 1949 production, South Pacific. Before that, I really didn't understand any of their work. Too artsy, too intellectual. It was on South Pacific where Hammerstein's presence became more apparent. I think Sound Of Music was the group's undisputed masterpiece. It's an epic meditation on intangibility and Nazis.


Well, it certainly wasn't over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor.
 
2013-01-10 10:36:16 AM  

gunga galunga: Well, it certainly wasn't over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor.


Are you on a roll?
 
2013-01-10 01:36:17 PM  
British or American Cast Recording?

/really, I'm first?
 
2013-01-10 02:21:32 PM  

hasty ambush: DeaH: Primitive Screwhead: I've been a big Rodgers and Hammerstein fan ever since the debut of their 1949 production, South Pacific. Before that, I really didn't understand any of their work. Too artsy, too intellectual. It was on South Pacific where Hammerstein's presence became more apparent. I think Sound Of Music was the group's undisputed masterpiece. It's an epic meditation on intangibility and Nazis.

Nazis? It's set in the South Pacific theater where we were fighting the Japanese, not the Nazis.

Personally, I far prefer Rogers and Hart to Rogers and Hammerstein. Hammerstein dropped moral lesson anvils on the audiences' heads. In South Pacific, we learn all about how we have to be taught to hate. (Yet, the hero is conveniently stopped from getting together with his brown girlfriend on account of death. The heroine does get together with her white, European boyfriend, even though he has brown children. But at least there will be no brown hands to sully the flower of white womanhood, eh?) In Sound of Music, we get "maybe the flag with the black spider on it makes people nervous."

You guys don't make musicals sound very entertaining. I'll stick to watching strippers


I am staging a Motley Crue musical right now. I already have a shiatload of strippers and I am trying to come up with even more ways to cram naked chicks into the show.
I am drawing the line at ushers cause they are unionized and most are in their 70's.
 
2013-01-10 03:18:40 PM  

farkeruk: British or American Cast Recording?

/really, I'm first?


My thoughts, precisely. Some musicals, the West End is better, some it's Broadway, and then for some, the original concept album is the best version out there, even if the story wasn't quite complete. Like 'Chess.' Up until the Idina Menzel-Josh Groban-Adam Pascal version, they never had the story and staging quite how the creators wanted, nor will they ever beat the Elaine Paige-Tommy Korberg-Murray Head version from the Eighties.
 
2013-01-10 05:03:55 PM  

SpiderQueenDemon: farkeruk: British or American Cast Recording?

/really, I'm first?

My thoughts, precisely. Some musicals, the West End is better, some it's Broadway, and then for some, the original concept album is the best version out there, even if the story wasn't quite complete. Like 'Chess.' Up until the Idina Menzel-Josh Groban-Adam Pascal version, they never had the story and staging quite how the creators wanted, nor will they ever beat the Elaine Paige-Tommy Korberg-Murray Head version from the Eighties.


What makes you say the "Menzel/ Groban/ Pascal version" is definitive? I have never heard that before.

Concept albums are pretty rare in the world of new musicals. And for the most part the product of overzealous composers who think the sun rises and sets on their music. They are always wrong.
 
2013-01-10 05:18:08 PM  

T.M.S.: What makes you say the "Menzel/ Groban/ Pascal version" is definitive? I have never heard that before.

Concept albums are pretty rare in the world of new musicals. And for the most part the product of overzealous composers who think the sun rises and sets on their music. They are always wrong.


They did a concert version at the Royal Albert Hall, and when Tim Rice opened the production, he said it was definitive. (That does agree with your argument of composer-side bias, true.) It's on DVD and I really liked it, but the first version still appeals to me musically. The plot wasn't completely finished at the concept-album stage, to the point where characters were just tagged 'The American' and 'The Russian,' but the vocalists were really good.

In other cases, though, yes, the concept album is at best an item of historical interest or example of the composer's side of things. Like the concept album for 'Evita.' If you're really a huge Colm Wilkinson fan, it's nice to have, but it isn't the best version of the work. I don't generally recommend it. And the 'Encore' album for 'The Scarlet Pimpernel was definitely a composer showing off. The first version with Christine Andreas, Terrence Mann and Douglas Sills was just fine and there was no need for more, even if the show did go through more rewrites than Spock/Kirk slash fanfiction.

In still other cases, the concept album is a 'complete work' affair that throws in every song ever written for the project, includes performers outside the original cast and is more an at-home listening experience than a theater-enthusiast's souvenir of a good live production. 'The Civil War: The Complete Work' is like that, just a whole mess of songs interspersed with historical quotes. James Garner is Lincoln and Maya Angelou gives an awesome reading of Sojourner Truth's 'ain't I a woman' speech, plus the sheer diversity of performers makes it very enjoyable. That's definitely a two-disc album I'd recommend to a theater fan.
 
2013-01-10 05:18:13 PM  

T.M.S.: hasty ambush: DeaH: Primitive Screwhead: I've been a big Rodgers and Hammerstein fan ever since the debut of their 1949 production, South Pacific. Before that, I really didn't understand any of their work. Too artsy, too intellectual. It was on South Pacific where Hammerstein's presence became more apparent. I think Sound Of Music was the group's undisputed masterpiece. It's an epic meditation on intangibility and Nazis.

Nazis? It's set in the South Pacific theater where we were fighting the Japanese, not the Nazis.

Personally, I far prefer Rogers and Hart to Rogers and Hammerstein. Hammerstein dropped moral lesson anvils on the audiences' heads. In South Pacific, we learn all about how we have to be taught to hate. (Yet, the hero is conveniently stopped from getting together with his brown girlfriend on account of death. The heroine does get together with her white, European boyfriend, even though he has brown children. But at least there will be no brown hands to sully the flower of white womanhood, eh?) In Sound of Music, we get "maybe the flag with the black spider on it makes people nervous."

You guys don't make musicals sound very entertaining. I'll stick to watching strippers

I am staging a Motley Crue musical right now. I already have a shiatload of strippers and I am trying to come up with even more ways to cram naked chicks into the show.
I am drawing the line at ushers cause they are unionized and most are in their 70's.


You should put that on Kickstarter.
 
2013-01-10 06:48:20 PM  

SpiderQueenDemon: T.M.S.: What makes you say the "Menzel/ Groban/ Pascal version" is definitive? I have never heard that before.

Concept albums are pretty rare in the world of new musicals. And for the most part the product of overzealous composers who think the sun rises and sets on their music. They are always wrong.

They did a concert version at the Royal Albert Hall, and when Tim Rice opened the production, he said it was definitive. (That does agree with your argument of composer-side bias, true.) It's on DVD and I really liked it, but the first version still appeals to me musically. The plot wasn't completely finished at the concept-album stage, to the point where characters were just tagged 'The American' and 'The Russian,' but the vocalists were really good.

In other cases, though, yes, the concept album is at best an item of historical interest or example of the composer's side of things. Like the concept album for 'Evita.' If you're really a huge Colm Wilkinson fan, it's nice to have, but it isn't the best version of the work. I don't generally recommend it. And the 'Encore' album for 'The Scarlet Pimpernel was definitely a composer showing off. The first version with Christine Andreas, Terrence Mann and Douglas Sills was just fine and there was no need for more, even if the show did go through more rewrites than Spock/Kirk slash fanfiction.

In still other cases, the concept album is a 'complete work' affair that throws in every song ever written for the project, includes performers outside the original cast and is more an at-home listening experience than a theater-enthusiast's souvenir of a good live production. 'The Civil War: The Complete Work' is like that, just a whole mess of songs interspersed with historical quotes. James Garner is Lincoln and Maya Angelou gives an awesome reading of Sojourner Truth's 'ain't I a woman' speech, plus the sheer diversity of performers makes it very enjoyable. That's definitely a two-disc album I'd recommend to a theater fan.


I think its cool that composers have the ability to create these one-off "super group" recordings but never understood what any of it had to do with the shows themselves. Unless the production is staged it doesn't really count to me as anything other than a curiosity and as you say better at home listening experience. They are nice but in many cases prove how faulty the shows themselves really are. Chess, Civil War, Scarlet Pimpernel are all pretty good examples of shows that would probably have been better off never leaving the page/ unstaged performance. So it's kinda weird for a composer to declare one of these concerts definitive. It just excuses them from unworkable shows too easily and hides the problems behind the big stars they draw.

Still, these things are good work for performers, a great venue for composers, wonderful for the fans and sometimes even decent fund raisers for not for profits. But I never saw much sense in them beyond that.

I don't really follow these concerts or any recordings at all but cannot imagine a composer putting every song written for a musical anywhere. That would be putting out some pretty awful stuff. And severely limiting their collection of trunk tunes. (unless it's Frank Wildhorn)
 
2013-01-10 06:51:13 PM  

MysticSavage:

You should put that on Kickstarter.


That site seems like a cool idea. But I think this show is already pretty well capitalized.

Thanks for the link.
 
2013-01-10 09:20:56 PM  

Son of Thunder: SockMonkeyHolocaust: Sure, I love formulaic entertainment targeted specifically at gay men, old women and young girls.

Shut up, moron.


Why don't you sing a song that sounds faintly like it was recycled from the last three Andrew Lloyd Weber musicals before bursting into a spontaneous dance number to end Act I about it, simp.
 
2013-01-11 12:37:37 AM  
Does it include a splatter zone?
 
2013-01-11 07:59:34 PM  

Nemo's Brother: The sign of the ultimate hack is to make a musical out something unconventional for musicals. This is a stupid idea high schoolers come up with for a few minutes and move on. It's like Abraham Lincoln, Vampire Hunter (since there have already been many other 'vampire hunter's) and Hansel and Gretal witch hunter. Our writers and entertainers are on empty.


Oh, good for you.
 
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