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(Wired)   A mysterious new dark force in the universe has been discovered in Long Beach, California   (wired.com) divider line 7
    More: Cool, universe, Long Beach, weak forces, Musket Ball Cluster, galaxy clusters, dwarf galaxies, galactic collisions, dark matter  
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10096 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 Jan 2013 at 7:45 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-09 09:36:16 PM
2 votes:
The problem looking at deep-field images is you have to remind yourself that you're looking into the distant past.

These galaxies are no longer in those positions and may not exist anymore in the form we see -- the further out we look, the older it is.

That's why 3D maps of the known universe are misleading because as you rotate it and move through them it bears no relation to the true current state or position of them.

If you did a thought experiment where light traveled so slowly on a human scale of distances -- e.g. if light took a century to travel the distance of the walls of the room you are in now -- you might see a tree or a cow that lived in the open field before your house was built instead of seeing your driveway or the previous occupant instead of a chair.

Speed of light really distorts things.
2013-01-09 07:36:36 PM
2 votes:
Snoop has been a well-known dark force in the LBC for years.
2013-01-10 12:18:51 AM
1 votes:
Dark matter walks like this....duhm, duhm, duhm.
Light Matter walks like this...dee, dee, dee
2013-01-10 12:18:27 AM
1 votes:

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: BINGO! Always follow the money.


Eh? If you're suggesting physicists are making this up just to get money, you...

... You really have no idea what makes people get into science, do you?

/Hint: If their primary concern was making lots of money, THEY WOULD NOT HAVE BECOME PHYSICISTS.
2013-01-09 09:55:08 PM
1 votes:

lohphat: The problem looking at deep-field images is you have to remind yourself that you're looking into the distant past.

These galaxies are no longer in those positions and may not exist anymore in the form we see -- the further out we look, the older it is.

That's why 3D maps of the known universe are misleading because as you rotate it and move through them it bears no relation to the true current state or position of them.

If you did a thought experiment where light traveled so slowly on a human scale of distances -- e.g. if light took a century to travel the distance of the walls of the room you are in now -- you might see a tree or a cow that lived in the open field before your house was built instead of seeing your driveway or the previous occupant instead of a chair.

Speed of light really distorts things.


I'm not sure how that's relevant. The galaxies and related dark matter were in this state at some point in the past, and that state requires an explanation, thus inferring a "dark" (ugh) force.
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-01-09 09:39:02 PM
1 votes:
big pig peaches

Dark matter is probably not made of anything you would notice if it were piled in front of you, except it couldn't be in a pile in front of you because it would fall through the surface of the earth.

There were theories of dark matter that had it composed of normal matter than you can touch. The term is "baryonic dark matter." Various tests have ruled out broad classes of baryonic dark matter. For example, if dark matter were made of stray planets we would notice a much higher rate of gravitational microlensing.

We can only speculate if the speculative dark matter in the article can even form piles. Physical constants have to be precisely tuned to allow a universe like ours, with stars and rocks and jellyfish. If dark matter is like ours but the strong and weak nuclear forces are a bit weaker, dark stars don't form. Dark black holes, maybe, but not dark stars. I assume the "no hair" law says dark black holes look like light black holes and decay into an equal mix of light and dark particles, which suggests an interesting way to test theories of dark matter. Create a black hole, count the decay products, measure the mass, and see if some mass goes missing. This is similar to how neutrinos were discovered.

We can also put some limits on what dark matter is by comparing theories of primordial nucleosynthesis to observed element abundances. Non-baryonic dark matter has to be something really weird.
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-01-09 04:09:10 PM
1 votes:
Why should the number of types of matter stop at two? Maybe the ether quantum field has an infinite number of dimensions / degrees of freedom. We're using a bucket of them for our own universe (light). A parallel universe (dark) uses another bucket, but shares gravity with us. And then there's the mauve universe which doesn't interact with our own but does interact with the dark and cyan universes through the squiggly and squishy forces. And if we look close enough there may be two types of dark matter detectable by us.

I sense full employment for future particle physicists. We need a bigger particle accelerator to properly probe these alternate universes. (But see Einstein's Bridge as a cautionary tale.)
 
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